Category Archives: Charities

6TH ANNUAL OTTAWA CHRISTMAS CONCERT and CAROL SING

CONCERT BLOG POSTER

  6th Annual Community Concert & Carol Sing 

 St. Timothy’s Presbyterian Church

2400 Alta Vista Drive

Sunday, Dec. 1, 2:00 p.m.

    ~ Presented by ~   

Garth Hampson
Dominic D’Arcy
NorthWinds Brass Quintet
Scola Basilicae
Linda Major
The fiVe Woodwind Quintet
The Emmanubells
St. Tim’s African Chorus
Natalie Harrison, Dominic D’Arcy’s Rising Star
Ainsley Phillips, Dominic D’Arcy’s Rising Star
St. Tim’s Choir

   Come join us for an afternoon of  

Christmas music and carol singing ~

a wonderful way to ‘sing in’ the Advent season

   Refreshments following  

   Free will donations in aid of
            the Heron Emergency Food Centre

   Come Celebrate with us

   Plenty of parking and Handicap accessible.

Six years ago, as Organist and Music Director of St. Timothy’s Presbyterian Church, I organized our first Christmas Community Concert and Carol Sing in aid of the Heron Emergency Food Centre.
Now I am so pleased to invite you to our ‘6th’ concert this coming Sunday afternoon.

                        Hope to see you there!   

 

ALEXANDRA COUSTEAU ON THE OTTAWA RIVER

COUSTEAU OTTAWA RIVER

ALEX PHOTOAlexandra Cousteau, granddaughter of the famed oceanographer and environmentalist Jacques Cousteau, was in the Ottawa for a 13-day filmmaking trip to the Ottawa River watershed as part of a project to make three short documentaries on the Ottawa River, in co-operation with the Ottawa Riverkeeper group. Cousteau and    Riverkeeper Meredith Brown took to the water to sample the river near the Hull Marina, testing for oxygen, phosphorus and nitrogen in the water.  The documentary is about the Ottawa River and its tributaries, focusing on issues of waterway management and conservation. 

RIVERKEEPER LOGOIn my previous blog the video, ‘Ottawa River Keeper’ provides historical background and impressive scenery for  today’s video, “Alexandra Cousteau on the Ottawa River”, published on Youtube September 14, 2013.

BLUE LEGACY LOGOAlexandra Cousteau heads the Washington-based Blue Legacy foundation, which is “dedicated to advocating the importance of conservation and sustainable management of water in order to preserve a healthy planet.”

The three documentaries will be released in the spring of 2014.

 Link ~ … “The goal of our water quality monitoring program is to provide communities with timely, easy-to-understand information on water quality along their reach of the river; MEREDITH BROWNinformation that is surprisingly difficult, if not impossible, to get elsewhere,” says Riverkeeper Meredith Brown. “Not only does this engage communities in protecting the river, they have a right to know what’s in their water.”…

http://www.fondationdegaspebeaubien.org/en/news/alexandra-cousteau-tells-the-story-of-her-10-days-expedition-on-the-ottawa

OTTAWA RIVER KEEPER ~ IMPRESSIVE VIDEO

OTTAWA RIVER

The following video, “Ottawa River Keeper”, was uploaded on Mar. 10, 2008, by Lu Utronki.  This video is designed to bring awareness to the importance of the Ottawa River for sustainability. 

The Ottawa River flows through the provinces of Quebec and Ontario for over 1200 kilometres.  There are almost 2 million people who live throughout the Ottawa River watershed.  To the Algonquin First Nations who lived by its banks and traveled by canoe the river was known as the Kitchi-sippi, meaning “The Great River“.  Visitors such as white water paddlers, fishing enthusiasts and river trippers from around the world looking for a wilderness experience  enjoy the Ottawa River year round.  The Ottawa River is a globally significant river and is part of the Great Lakes St. Lawrence watershed, and is the largest freshwater system in the entire world.

Hope to see you back here for our next blog featuring “Ottawa River Keeper Part 2″ and “Alexandra Cousteau on the Ottawa River” – a Youtube video published this year on September 14th.

SOPHISTICATED GROUNDWATER MONITORING VIA SATELLITE

WATERCANADALOGOThe following excerpts are taken from Water Canada’s March/April 2013 article, “UNDERGROUND NETWORK – From sensors below the surface to satellites  somewhere in orbit, groundwater monitoring is becoming more  sophisticated”, by Erin Pehlivan.

HELEN APIO CHARITY.ORGHelen Apio is filled with joy as she collects clean water in her Northern Uganda village.  When she didn’t have water, she would walk to the nearest well—2.4 kilometres away—and wait in line with hundreds of other women, clutching two empty five-gallon water cans, anticipating stock.

BC GROUNDWATERCharity: water has helped women like Apio by introducing a unique water technology that detects groundwater in developing countries. Founded in 2006, charity: water’s first project was to install six wells in a Ugandan refugee camp.  They bought a GPS for $100, took it to Uganda, visited each project location and plotted six points on Google Maps, making the information and images public on their website.  Six years later, the charity has funded over 6,994 water projects in 20 countries serving over 2.5 million people with clean drinking waterCHARITY PUMP SENSORSThey have recently been allocated US$5 million for a pilot project via Google’s Global Impact Award to develop remote sensor technology specifically for groundwater.

So far, the charity has mapped each of its water projects to see how they function in real-time.  The remote sensor technology will help keep them posted on whether water is flowing at any of their projects, at any given time, anywhere in the world.

The efficient design of remote sensor technology means that individual community members don’t need to visit every project physically to ensure constant water flow.  These sensors manage time, budgets and resources with ease, allowing more time to be spent analyzing the actual water sample itself in the lab.

Below the surface: While real-time technology is growing more common throughout the water industry, groundwater applications are scarce.

RICHARDRichard Kolacz, president of Global Spatial Technology Solutions Inc. (GSTS), observes smart sensor capabilities that connect to groundwater sensors in Canada, allowing people to collect information from the sensors remotely.

GSTS LOGO2One Ontario conservation authority is already using one of GSTS’s water sensor prototypes on site.  Initially, conservation authorities collected information manually.  Now they’re able to collect it remotely.  “We’ve developed an interface – a means of connecting to a groundwater sensor— to collect information in a format that the conservation authority likes,” says Kolacz.  “Rather than waiting six months or more to collect data, they could have it back instantly.”

GROUNDWATER SENSORSThe data coming from groundwater sensors to conservation authorities allows them to monitor water quality and quantity, and helps them understand the health and use of the water.

What’s so important about monitoring water data?  The data could help First Nations communities in northern Ontario, according to Kolacz.  “We would have the ability to monitor key data points on potentially clean or waste water treatment plants, and provide opportunities to monitor the health and status of those facilities remotely,” he says.

Much like charity: water, the difficulty with GSTS’s prototype comes from having to train staff to manage facilities. The data still has to be analyzed, and the quality of that analysis depends upon a certain level of knowledge.

Please note:  I found the following YouTube video, published on Mar 27, 2013, that is directly related to the above information.  Mr. Kolacz speaks about GSTS’s most recent application regarding goundwater monitoring.  His presentation dealing with this topic runs from 3:20 to 7:30 on the video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=tEIb4z3YFe0#at=237

CHARITY SENSORS2Meanwhile, charity: water’s goal is to develop and install 4,000 low-cost remote sensors in existing and new water projects globally, all of which will transmit real-time data to the charity, its partners, and eventually to donors via status updates.  Canada can learn from this model. According to the 2010 Review and Assessment of Canadian Groundwater Resources, Management, Current Research Mechanisms and Priorities by theCCME LOGO Canadian Council of Ministers of the  Environment, practitioners in the field need access to organized groundwater data.  With projects like the ones charity: water and GSTS are piloting, that access can skyrocket.

SATELITEGroundwater is a valuable resource, but it is poorly understood and expensive to investigate. Incentives to effectively manage the resource are low. But respondents of the aforementioned review demand significant effort from the provincial government databases to provide up-to-date groundwater information accessible online. And once we embrace the new insights of cloud-based collaboration and networked sensor arrays, science-based policy will develop and advance, leading to more responsible water resource management and investments – especially when it comes to the murky and mysterious water that flows beneath us. Erin Pehlivan is a Toronto-based writer.

Related links ~

http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/earth-sciences/geography-boundary/remote-sensing/geospatial/1196

for Charity:water ~ http://washfunders.org/Blog/(offset)/30

DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL ~ TEAM SHOWBOAT ~ “UNDER THE BIG TOP”

 DRAGON BOAT 2013

DRAGON CUTE GIMPYouTube promotional video for Ottawa‘s upcoming 20th annual Dragon Boat Festival – June 22-24, 2013, published on Jun 7, 2012 by CTVOttawaMorningLiveA dragon boat comes rowing down the street outside of the CTV Morning Live studio, so Jeff Hopper heads out to chat with them!

TEAMThe Ottawa Dragon Boat Festival, now North America’s largest festival, began in 1994. Four years later, a charitable component was added to raise funds for local charities. To date, the Ottawa Dragon Boat Foundation has raised over $2.5 million for local charities.

SHOW BOAT LOGOFor several years, under several different names, the members of Showboat have pledged and paddled in the Ottawa Dragon Boat Festival.  Sponsored by the Chinatown BIA, Showboat, under the direction of Rick Martin, Kevin Reichstein, Mealanie St. Jean and Stephanie Mayer, consists of 20 paddlers, a few alternates, a steersperson and a drummer. This dynamic Dragon Boat team draws a lot of attention, year after year, as the whole day is spent in themed costumes – obviously this year’s theme is “Under The Big Top”.

DRAGON BOAT 20131

​The vast majority of the teams attending the Ottawa Dragon Boat Festival are there for competitive reasons, paddling in various heats in a quest for medals.  Chinatown’s Showboat concentrates on fundraising activities throughout the year to support charities that benefit from the Ottawa Dragon Boat Foundation.  So far this year Team Showboat has already raised $17,000 in fundraising events such as:

Karaoke Night KARAOKE

Zumba in the park  ZUMBA2

Great Glebe Garage Sale  GLEBE GARAGE SALE

VIP Gala Launch Party        9441VIP GALA LAUNCH PARTY

Drawing from the immense talent that exists in the community, events at various venues around town and the generosity of many Showboat supporters, the team has raised considerable funds. Since 2005, the team raised $82,752.38.

For 2005 through 2007 and again in 2010, the team was recognized by the Ottawa Dragon Boat Race Festival through the Team Spirit Cup award.

I just had to include the following inspirational video I found on YouTube, “Must Watch Dragon Boat Clip!!!”, taken from various dragon boat events in Singapore.  This video was created to show that the sport, dragon boating, is not just about training hard to win, but to enjoy and embrace all the elements that it encompasses ~ Love ~ Pride ~ Unity ~

KAYAK PADDLEGIMPICONDip, dip and swing your paddles

              Flashing with silver

              Follow the wild goose flight

            Dip, dip and swing…

Good luck Team Showboat!KAYAK PADDLEGIMPICON

AMAZING QUEST ~ INCREDIBLE ACCOMPLISHMENT!!!

         WATERTON NAT1

The following excerpts are taken from, “Survivor raises money swimming in 158 Glacier, Waterton lakes”,  by Tristan Scott of the Missoulian

MARK BEST PHOTOMarc Ankenbauer’s aqueous obsession has lured him into the frigid waters of exactly 158 lakes in Glacier and Waterton Lakes National Parks.

MARC SWIMMING2Marc Ankenbauer swims through frigid waters on his quest to plunge into all 168 named lakes in Waterton-Glacier National Parks as part of a 12-year project to raise money for the nonprofit organization Camp Mak-A-Dream, which provides wilderness experiences for children and young adults diagnosed with cancer…

MARC SWIMMINGThere are 168 named lakes in Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park and, having dived into all but 10, this summer Ankenbauer will become the first person known to bathe in them all… Since beginning his project 12 years ago, Ankenbauer, 36, who survived a brief bout with cancer as a teenager, has been raising money for the … Camp Mak-A-Dream’s mission struck a chord with Ankenbauer, who since 2001 has spent his summers working as a backcountry ranger in Glacier Park, and is passionate about outdoor experiences and exploring western Montana’s vast open spaces…

He launched a website, glacierexplorer.com, and created an online donation program, setting an arbitrary goal of raising $5,000. Last week, a donation from a family friend in Cincinnati pushed Ankenbauer past his goal…
imagesCAA2ICVQ34The project also has given Ankenbauer incentive to explore Waterton-Glacier’s 1.2 million acres, and to set out for lakes that most people have never visited. It also entails long, arduous, off-trail hikes, as well as bushwhacking through dense thickets of alder.  “One of the reasons this has taken so long is that it is challenging to access some of these remote spots,” he said. “I bet I have averaged about 20 lakes a year, but last summer I only got seven, and the summer before that I only jumped in 12. But they were a tough, burly 12.”

Images of some of the National Park‘s inhabitants that I think Mark would likely come across &/or see while trekking to his next lake destination in the park.  A few of these encounters would be hair-raising to say the least!!!

WATERTON NAT

Ankenbauer estimates that half of the lakes require off-trail travel, and their remoteness has offered numerous opportunities to observe wildlife. 

SNYDER LAKECROPPEDAfter jumping into Snyder Lake, a grizzly bear began lumbering toward Ankenbauer and a companion, and once, after hiking 10 miles to

AURICE LAKEAurice Lake, a spooked sow grizzly and her cubs forced Ankenbauer to abort the jump and turn around.  “I’ve jumped into two different lakes that had moose in them at the time,” Ankenbauer said.

FISHERCAP LAKEAll but one of Ankenbauer’s remaining lakes are located in remote and off-the-grid areas, and he’s saving the easiest one for last. He’ll conclude the project with Fishercap, a lake that is about a five-minute walk from the Swiftcurrent Motor Inn in the Many Glacier area.

“I decided to save that for the absolute end so my mom can come and watch,” he said. “So many people have been so incredibly supportive of this project that I owe it to them, especially my family and my wife. I could not have done this without her support and understanding.”

Many of the park’s glacier-fed lakes are a crystalline blue,
JOHNS LAKE BESTbut others, like Johns Lake, are as stagnant as pond scum.  “There are some really rough, rank bodies of water that are named,” he said. “I basically had to lower myself into Johns Lake and hope that I didn’t get too many leeches on me. It’s not all fame and fortune.” 
GREEN LAKEGreen Lake had so little water that Ankenbauer’s swim trunks didn’t get completely wet, even after he lay down in it.

 When the project is finished, Ankenbauer isn’t worried about his life lacking adventure. He’ll continue working for the park, and may return to Antarctica, where he worked this winter as a camp host for scientists and researchers at McMurdo Station. He’ll also spend more time with his wife, who Ankenbauer is living with in Missoula while she completes her nursing degree. The couple will return to East Glacier this summer.

MARC ANKENBAUER2 “I’ve been given one of the greatest luxuries in the world. I get to live in one of the greatest places on Earth,” he said. “I’m not out to conquer some unattainable goal. I’m more like the average, everyday guy adventurer. At times, it has been epically difficult and mentally tedious. I’ve thrashed around in alder thickets for so long that I just had to start laughing. But it has breathed a lot of adventure into my life. It’s a celebration of life.”

http://missoulian.com/lifestyles/hometowns/man-raises-money-by-swimming-in-glacier-and-waterton-parks/article_84ccdd48-8934-11e2-838a-0019bb2963f4.html