Category Archives: Nature conservation

Stop Oil Tanker Traffic in B.C.

BC OIL TANKER TRAFFIC
Just ONE Exxon-Valdez-like spill on British Columbia’s coast could devastate thousands of families and a spectacular diversity of life. We shouldn’t take that risk!

Aren’t you tired of Big Oil targeting populated areas with rich flora and fauna and delicate environments as the next hot place to traffic oil? I sure am. It’s almost like they’re targeting areas of the world with the most to lose from an oil spill!

OIL COLLAGE

Send a message to Canada’s and British Columbia’s governments: Don’t traffic oil along B.C.’s coast!

Enbridge, Kinder Morgan, and CN Rail are all chomping at the bit to expand crude oil tanker traffic through B.C.’s coast en route to Asia. It would put a number of salmon rivers – as well as the thousands of people, cultures, and livelihoods that depend on B.C.’s coast – at risk for an oil spill, an event that could devastate the area.

First Nation communities are banning these projects with the Coastal First Nations and Save the Fraser declarations. Let’s unite with these strong efforts and stand up against oil tanker traffic on B.C.’s coast!

Please sign the petition by clicking the link below ~

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/333/333/751/?z00m=20630007

STOP NESTLE’S FREE EXTRACTION OF BC WATER

BC GROUNDWATER

Water is our most precious resource.  It nourishes us, helps grow our food, and keeps our cities and forests clean.  British Columbia is endowed with some of the best water resources in the world.

So why, instead of protecting our water, are we letting companies have it for free?

Today, news broke that Nestle, one of the world’s largest food and water companies, has been bottling upwards of 265 million liters of British Columbia water EVERY YEAR…for nothing.  That is a small lake each year, gone, sold for corporate profit.

This water belongs to the citizens or people of British Columbia, and is NOT meant to be exploited by a Corporation for profit.  Call on the BC Environmental Ministry and Provincial Government to immediately change the law and force Nestle to pay a fair price for the water it sells every year.  This can’t stand.

As of August 22, 2013 4:55 p.m. we have 5,412 signatures, help us get to 10,000.

PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION by clicking on the link below – MANY THANKS!!!

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/328/443/296/stop-nestles-free-extraction-of-bc-water/

NESTLE SIGNHere’s an excellent article on this topic ~

WATER SHOULD BE A ‘PUBLIC TRUST’…

http://www.theprovince.com/news/Wild+West+groundwater+Billion+dollar+company+extracting+drinking+water+free/8785227/story.html

EARTH DAY 2013 ~ OTTAWA, CANADA

EARTH DAY 2013 PHOTOPAD

The first Canadian Earth Day was held on Thursday, September 11, 1980, and was organized by Paul D. Tinari, then a graduate student in Engineering Physics/Solar Engineering at Queen’s University. Flora MacDonald, then MP for Kingston and the Islands and Canadian Secretary of State for External Affairs, officially opened Earth Day Week on September 6, 1980 with a ceremonial tree planting and encouraged MPs and MPPs across the country to declare a cross-Canada annual Earth Day. The principal activities taking place on the first Earth Day included educational lectures given by experts in various environmental fields, garbage and litter pick-up by students along city roads and highways as well as tree plantings to replace the trees killed by Dutch Elm Disease.

CANADA LOGO PHOTOPAD Earth Day Canada (EDC) is a national environmental charity founded in 1990 that provides Canadians with practical knowledge, tools, and simple easy-to-accomplish actions to support a healthier environment through EDC’s year-round and award-winning programs. 

 
ECOKIDS LOGOGIMPEcoKids supports teachers and students, grades K-8, with free educational resources, curriculum-linked lesson plans including ESL and FSL, and homework help and games for students. EcoMentors offers youth the training and resources they need to facilitate local environmental education workshops with their peers and other young Canadians…

TOYOTA SCHOLARSHIP PHOTOPADToyota Earth Day Scholarship Program recognizes tomorrow’s environmental leaders providing twenty $5 000 scholarships to graduating high school students going on to post-secondary education in the discipline of their choice. The Hometown Heroes Award Program recognizes environmental leaders at the community level with an individual and a group award (each with a cash-prize of $10 000), and business leaders with a small business award. Earth Day Canada’s Community Environment Fund funds sustainable community projects in Ontario providing grants of up to $20 000 to schools and not-for-profit organizations.

DIVERSITY PHOTOPADThe Diversity Engagement and Inclusion Initiative helps the environmental sector to better communicate with, engage and activate Canada’s diverse social and cultural communities. The Employee Engagement program works with employers to achieve business and sustainability goals through inclusion of best practices.

Here’s a wonderful video, ” A Photographic Tribute to The Ocean” from OneEarthOneOcean that I just came across ~ This Earth Day, One World One Ocean is giving the ocean the attention it deserves with a special video collection of ocean photographs from our online community. Here is the ocean through their eyes.

OTTAWA LOGO PHOTOPADLet’s take up the challenge
to do our part as keepers of Mother Earth
- the need is great!

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Day#Earth_Day_Canada

DEATH OF CANADIAN FORESTS – MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE

PINE BEETLE CANADA

PINE BEETLE8GIMPBESTA natural disaster that is
going to occur across all of Canada!

I decided to take the time to Google “pine beetles in Canada” and now realize just how serious a threat the pine beetle is to our environment just from reading headings such as: ‘death of a forest’; ‘the threat of mountain pine beetle‘; ‘pine beetle threatening new B.C. tree species’; ‘pine beetle contributing to forest smog’;  ‘pine beetles contributing to climate change’, etc.

PINE BEETLE8GIMPBESTPine beetle damage extends from forests to drinking water.  The deep green pine trees of British Columbia’s great forests are turning a rusty red, thanks to the mountain pine beetle’s increasing resilience to warming winter temperatures. The grain-sized critter, which lives in the bark of mature trees, kills the trees within months, leaving the wood an ash grey colour once the pine needles fall out years later.  The mountain pine beetle’s devastation has spread over 20 per cent of British Columbia’s total area, costing the province $884 million. By 2014, it is projected that 80 per cent of the province’s pine forests will disappear, an outcome with unprecedented economic, social, and environmental consequences.

Here is a CBC News: The National video from Nelson, British Columbia, Canada, presented by Chris Brown - uploaded on Apr 24, 2008

The mountain pine beetle’s infestation in western Canada is turning forests into a new source of greenhouse gases, according to new research published in the journal Nature

PINE BEETLE COLORADOA recent study by the Colorado School of Mines shows that Colorado’s quality of local drinking water is also affected by the beetle.  Driven by climate change, mountain pine beetles are infesting pine wood in Colorado and releasing more carbon into watersheds. This changes how disinfectant chemicals interact with water during treatment, and in turn creates potentially harmful by-products.

PINE BEETLE CANADA1What does this mean for Canada’s west coast?  “The vast majority of British Columbia’s population lives far away from the pine beetle crisis,” says Brennan Clarke, media representative at British Columbia’s Ministry of Forests, Land and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO). It’s unlikely that pine beetles will interact with drinking water resources, but FLNRO continues studying the beetle’s impact on regional hydrology.

PINE BEETLE8GIMPBESTThe damage to the ecosystem is already done with over four million devastated acres of forest in Colorado and Wyoming, where studies show changes in water chemistry and nitrate levels in watersheds, which can cause algae growth in downstream drinking water reservoirs. Risk of wildfires is another hazard to drinking water as water-resistant soils prevent water penetration.

Jim Bouldin, a research ecologist writing for RealClimate, says there is a “complex relationship between the beetles, weather, forest conditions, and tree chemistry.” - Erin Pelhivan, WaterCanada Jan/Feb. 3013 magazine ~ “Critters and Carbon“.

Here is a link to an alarming award winning video I found on YouTube that points out the devastating effects this invasive insect will have on our economical and ecological future: Death Of A Forest – Pine Beetles kill millions of trees in US & Canada ~ uploaded by Wild Visions, Inc . on Feb 14, 2011
http://youtu.be/KTHXPJwaLTc

OTTAWA RIVERKEEPER ADVENTURE FILM FESTIVAL

Ottawa-River-Keeper1Ottawa-River-Keeper-logo

Ottawa’s First Wild and Scenic Film Festival

Join Ottawa Riverkeeper for an evening of adventure-packed films that celebrate our natural world while raising funds to protect the Ottawa River.

Ottawa-River-Keeper2

The evening includes a silent auction, door prizes and the opportunity to speak to the Ottawa Riverkeeper herself, Meredith Brown!

When: Thursday, February 21, 2013 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
(Doors open at 6:30 pm)

Where: Library and Archives Canada, 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa

Why: All proceeds from this evening support Ottawa Riverkeeper initiatives, including the purchase of water quality test kits for our Riverwatch Program. Swim. Drink. Fish. It’s your river, it’s your right!

Tickets: $12 General Admission, $50 VIP pass (1 ticket with reserved premium seating and admission to our prescreening reception)

Hosted by Ottawa Riverkeeper, this year’s Wild and Scenic Film Festival features award-winning environmental documentaries with a focus on freshwater.

Through stellar filmmaking, beautiful cinematography and first-rate storytelling these films inform, inspire and ignite solutions to restore the earth, build strong communities, and create a positive future for the next generation.

Award Winning Films

White Water, Black Gold
Follows David Lavallee on his three year journey across western Canada in search of the truth about the impact of the world’s thirstiest oil industry. This is a journey of jarring contrasts, from the pristine mountain icefields that are the source of this industry’s water, to the Tar Sands tailings ponds. White Water, Black Gold is a sober look at the untold costs associated with this unconventional ‘oil’. Take a sneak peak!

Chasing Water
Follow the Colorado River, source to sea, with photographer Pete McBride who takes an intimate look at the watershed as he attempts to follow the irrigation water that sustains his family’s Colorado ranch, down river to the sea. Check out the trailer

For a full listing of films…


Amazing Prizes

A Stand Up Paddle group lesson for six from Paddlefit

An Ocean Wise five-course menu by Executive Chef Walid El-Tawel with Restaurant e18hteen

Buy tickets online or at Delilah (in the Parc), Delilah (in the Glebe), Mountain Equipment Co-op or Trailhead

“Like” Ottawa Riverkeeper on Facebook and share this contest for a chance to win 2 VIP passes to the festival!


Not already a member? Join Ottawa Riverkeeper today!


Forward this message to a friend


Ottawa Riverkeeper is a charitable organization. Our business number is 862697059RR0001. Please consider making a donation to support our work.

Concerned citizens like you are part of a watershed network of people committed to the protection and conservation of our river. Thank you for helping to keep our watershed healthy!

Copyright ©2012 Ottawa Riverkeeper Inc.
301-1960 Scott Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1Z 8L8
Phone 613-321-1120 1-888-9Keeper
Privacy Policy Website Contact

OIL SHOWDOWN IN THE AMAZON

AMAZON RAINFOREST

AVAAZ LOGOGIMPCROPPEDPosted: 24 January 2013 by AVAAZ.org

There is one area of the Ecuadorian Amazon that is so pristine that the whole ecosystem has been preserved and even jaguars roam free! But the government is now threatening to go in and drill for oil.

The local indigenous people have been resisting, but they are afraid that oil companies will break up the community with bribes. When they heard that people across the world might stand with them and make a stink to save their land, they were thrilled. The president of Ecuador claims to stand for indigenous rights and the environment, but he has just come up with a new plan to bring oil speculators in to 4 million hectares of jungle. If we can say ‘wait a minute, you’re supposed to be the green president who says no one can buy Ecuador’, we could expose him for turning his back on his commitments just as he is fighting for re-election.

He doesn’t want a PR nightmare right now. If we get a million of us to help the Sani Isla Kichwa community defend their ancestral land and challenge the president openly to keep to his word, we could start a media storm that would make him reconsider the whole plan.

PLEASE sign the petition now and tell everyone (everyone!) ~ let’s help save this beautiful forest.

 http://www.avaaz.org/en/oil_in_the_amazon_8/?clTFScb

THE TRICKLE-DOWN EFFECT

The following excerpts are taken from WaterCanada’s July/August issue of, “The Trickle-Down Effect” – Industry, agriculture, and government have voices about water in Alberta. But who speaks for the environment’s needs? by Susan R. Eaton

“Heralded as the economic growth engine of Canada, Alberta has recently discovered that its most strategic resource may not be subsurface oil and gas reserves. Perhaps more critical to future economic development will be the existence of abundant and predictable quantities of water. As the prairie province deals with water allocation for a burgeoning population and expanding industrial sectors – oil sands, agriculture, petrochemicals and power generation - it is feeling the impacts of climate change, including droughts, destructive floods, and reduced contributions from rapidly receding mountain glaciers that feed Alberta’s waterways and aquifers…”

Uploaded by on Dec 7, 2007 – A TV SPOT in a series for the United Nations Canada Water for Life initiative. The Bow River Basin Council and the Oldman Watershed Council are providing leadership and solutions to how water is conserved and protected.  Visit thinkwater.ca for more information.


 “In August 2006, four of five rivers in southern Alberta’s South Saskatchewan River Basin were closed to new water withdrawals, due to over-allocation by the provincial regulator.

In northern Alberta, oil sands companies continue to seek increased allocations from the Athabasca River to support their rapidly expanding, water-intensive bitumen mining and upgrading operations. Current withdrawals may have already compromised the river’s healthy inflow capacity during the low-flow fall and winter months… Critics accuse the Alberta government of approving amendments to senior water licence agreements—often without public input—and of diverting unused volumes of water to third parties, for purposes other than originally intended and to the detriment of Alberta’s waterways. The Province created its Water Act in 2000, legislating, for the first time, the monetization—through the sale, transfer, or carving up of senior water rights—of Alberta’s water resources… Andy Ridge is the director of water policy for Alberta’s Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Resource Development…”

Uploaded by  on Mar 23, 2010 -A short video that explains the upcoming water allocation review. Please visit us http://www.water-matters.org/program/share-the-water

“Water mastery Ridge says, when it comes to meeting that water needs of Alberta’s diverse stakeholders, “it’s always circumstance specific.” “We apply water mastery when there’s an issue,” says Ridge. “Water mastery” is his term to describe the Province’s balancing act of meeting the water needs—current and future. “In tough times, we get involved to ensure that everyone is less harmed,” says Ridge. But tough times have existed for more than a decade in southern Alberta, where the Province has ordered junior water holders to reduce or stop water withdrawals, enabling “first in time, first in right” senior holders to maintain their draws… In 2010, the Province approved a request for an amendment of the City of Calgary’s senior license to divert treated wastewater to a new gas-fired power plant  being built nearby by ENMAX Corporation. In 2007, the Province approved  an amendment to the City of Edmonton’s water senior license, enabling it to sell  wastewater to Petro- Canada Ltd. (now Suncor Energy Inc.) for use in heavy oil  upgrading operations east of the city. In both instances, Donahue explains, the  amendments of senior water licences resulted in negative benefits to Calgary’s  Bow River and to Edmonton’s North Saskatchewan River, as wastewater was  diverted for industrial purposes and not returned to the river systems. He adds  that Petro-Canada and ENMAX avoided costly public environmental hearings and  idn’t have to apply for low priority, junior water licenses.   Return it to the  rivers For the past decade, the City of Calgary has encouraged its residents to  conserve water, even providing financial incentives to purchase low flush toilets  and install water meters. However, Calgarians who believed they were  contributing to improving the aquatic health and trout habitat of the Bow River—  billed by Travel Alberta as the world’s premier trout fishing stream – might be  surprised to learn that the water conserved had been sold for industrial users or to  ther municipalities in southern Alberta… The Calgary-based Water  Conservation Trust of Canada is working  toward ensuring conserved water gets  back to the stream…The Trust’s mandate revolves around holding water  conservation licenses. However, according to Ridge, “The concept of a license  that’s being held for the environment – that’s what the Water Conservation Trust  of Canada is promoting – is contained in the Water Act.” To date, only the Province  olds these conservation licenses in trust, but the Water Act doesn’t  specifically prohibit other groups from doing so, too. Just as Alberta’s  homesteaders developed the province in the early 1900s, Bell, a native Albertan, is  ioneering a new vision for prosperity which includes an innovative tool to  achieve the healthy aquatic ecosystems contemplated within the provincial Water  Act. “We’ve spent six years breaking trail,” said Bell, “and we’re close to a  breakthrough.”

Water as a Limited Resource

Got Thirst? Will Alberta’s Water Law leave you high and dry?

UNITED STATES CLEAN WATER ACT TURNS 40

 

October 18th marks the 40th anniversary of the United States Clean Water Act.

What Is the Clean Water Act?
Here’s a look at what the Clean Water Act is and how this legislation is intended to address water pollution.

Answer: The Clean Water Act or CWA is the primary legislation in the United States that addresses water pollution. The goal of the Clean Water Act is to limit the release of high volumes of toxic chemicals into the nation’s water and ensure that surface waters met standards for sports and recreational use.The present legislation is based on the Federal Water Pollution Control Amendments of 1972. Significant amendments were added in the Clean Water Act of 1977 and the Water Quality Act of 1987.

The following excerpts are from “A Bolder Clean Water Act for the Next 40 Years“, posted by Sandra Postel of National Geographic’s Freshwater Initiative in Water Currents on October 17, 2012.
We recommend you read the full article at: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2012/10/17/a-bolder-clean-water-act-for-the-next-40-years/

…As game-changing laws go, the 1972 U.S. Clean Water Act ranks high. With images of rivers like the Cuyahoga burning and fish floating belly up in Lake Erie still fresh in the public’s mind, the Act transformed the nation’s relationship with fresh water.  It forbade cities and industries from using rivers and lakes as waste receptacles… The Act also set an ambitious goal: by 1985 the nation’s waters should be “fishable and swimmable.”  Although we missed that deadline, we are two-thirds of the way to achieving that goal… This year, as we celebrate the Act’s 40th anniversary, we can take pride in its accomplishments.  But after four decades, the Act needs to be given new teeth and updated tools, both to meet its original goals as well as to address new water challenges that have emerged since its passage.”


Development of the EPA, uploaded by on Feb 5, 2010

The following YouTube video, “Clean Water Act turns 40″ is 1&1/4 hours in length. From the National Press Club in Washington, DC during May 2012 ~ Published on May 31, 2012 by

NATO PETITION ~ ARCTIC COUNCIL ~ WORTHWHILE!!

I’ve copied information I received from care2.com, regarding the petition I signed.  In my collage I’ve included a map of Greenland and Canada to point out the close proximity of the two countries and I find it rather alarming now that China’s interest in the area has been confirmed.

The Arctic Council is supposed to protect this incredible part of the earth from exploitation and destruction. But with climate change melting Greenland‘s waters, China is aggressively looking for a profit from mining and new shipping routes. Yet, it also wants to be an observer on the Council. Talk about conflict of interest!

I signed a petition voicing my concerns to NATO and Arctic Council officials and urged them to make sure they keep protecting the Arctic‘s natural resources.

I know you care about the health of our planet too, so I thought you’d want to join me and sign.

Here’s the link:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/869/770/954/dont-pave-the-arctic/

Greenland’s once frozen waters are now nearly ice-free. China’s not worried about the effect of global warming on the environment, though. They’re more concerned about getting first dibs on profiting from the area’s decline. 

China’s vying to become a permanent observer for the Arctic Council, a position that would allow them a say in decisions involving minerals and shipping
So far, they’ve been incredibly aggressive in the move to gain unclaimed Arctic regions. China has shown they’re uniquely qualified to access gas and oil sources in tricky locations in the northern Arctic. Since China also has an interest in exploring potential commercial shipping short-cuts through the area, they sent a ship to scout out possible routes.
Allowing countries to use the Arctic for shipping routes and mining will only expose Greenland waters to worse environmental distress.
Urge NATO and the Arctic Council to protect the Arctic and its natural resources!
 
If you did sign the petition thank you so very much.
 
 

GIVE THANKS FOR WATER

With many thanks to Fran Sorin for her inspiring blog, which I highly recommend you read (link at bottom), here are excerpts from, ‘Water: Joy, Beauty and Gratitude…Blog Action Day 2010′

“As a gardener and advocate of sustainable gardening, I thought that writing about water for Blog Action Day would be a no brainer.  Yet, each time I prepared to write about the importance of conserving water, my mind took me back to moments in my childhood; moments in which water played a pivotal role, leaving indelible memories and emotions of joy, love and beauty.

WATER: memories from my childhood.

~ Sights, smells, sounds… Walking through Watkins Glen, a maze of water and a force of nature, mesmerized by the sounds, sights and smells; knowing that I was touching divinity.
~ Watching and smelling torrential rain and hail sitting on the back the car in the garage
~ The ferocious lullaby of ocean waves – All of these scenes have had a significant emotional impact on me….one of beauty, sacredness and love.

Western civilization of the twenty first century overwhelmingly thinks of water as a product to be controlled and mastered in order to serve our needs. And yet, indigenous cultures revere water, understanding that it is the source of life. Prayers for water and Rain Dances historically were, and still are today, an integral part of certain cultures. These cultures intrinsically know that water is a powerful force, a gift from God, not to be taken lightly.

“Rain is grace; rain is the sky condescending to the earth; without rain, there would be no life.” - John Updike

We are water.

70% of our bodies is water. As newborns, our bodies are composed of 80% water. As we grow older, the percentage decreases. By the time we die, the % is below 50. Without enough water, we die.

For most of my life, I took water for granted…Today I think about water each time I use or come into contact with it. When I wake up in the morning and step into the shower, feeling the force of water on my back…experience a sense of gratitude. When I go rowing early in the morning or as dusk settles in, I am often stunned by the amount of pollution and things floating in the water (bottles, containers, papers, and God knows what else..). For a moment, I feel a flash of anger and frustration at others total disregard for this narrow, winding river. And yet, like a plant that is infested with insects, I remind myself that the water, regardless of the condition it is in, is inherently a magnificent, mysterious, life-giving force, pure and generous. And I give thanks… 

So, the next time you’re washing off fresh fruits and vegetables in your kitchen, pause, even for a few seconds, and give thanks to water, the source of life.”

Fran Sorin is a gardener, author, broadcaster, and spokesperson. She is the CBS Radio News Garden Contributor, has made dozens of appearances on national TV and written hundreds of articles for USA Weekend Magazine and other national publications.

Our best wishes to you

for a very Happy Thanksgiving.

http://www.gardeninggonewild.com/?p=14344