Category Archives: Uncategorized

Dogs/Cats React To First Snowstorm – so-o-o cute!

Perfect timing for ViralNova’s December 9,2014 post, as we just received our first major snowstorm of the season here in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

These 15 Animals Playing In Snow For The First Time Will Melt Your Heart, initially posted to boredpanda 10 days ago by Viktorija G. The comments for each photo are from ViralNova.

Newborn animals come with a number of first experiences. The first time you bring them home. The first time you catch them chewing on your shoes. Even the first time your heart melts after they snuggle beside you. But for all these firsts, there’s one that stands above all the others: the first time they play in snow.

This Polar Bear pup just got a dose of home.

 
 

That’s one chilly kitty.

 
 
 

Wait…I can’t even see you!

 

“It’s COLD…COLD…COLD!”

 
 

“Mom, it’s stuck in my ear…”

“Don’t tell mom…”

I bet you’re re-thinking that long coat.

He may be 8 years old, but he plays like a pup.

 

Yummmm, that’s the good stuff.

 

“What IS this?!”

 

“I don’t wanna come in! I’m still PLAYIN!”

 

“I swear I left a toy under here.”

 

His first snowfall feels just right.

 

Yup…cats hate snow, too.

 

“Grrrrrrr…….I’m not liking this whole ‘snow’ thing.”

These adorable animals are a reminder to keep your eyes open and experience the world with a child-like enthusiasm when that big Nor’easter arrives. After all, you can always have just as much fun as these adorable creatures!

Lucky for us, some lovely people had their cameras on hand when these 15 adorable animals had their first snow encounters. The results are beautiful scenes of wintry magic!

http://www.boredpanda.com/animals-playing-in-snow/?afterlogin=savevote&post=123993&score=1

Recent Submissions To This List

Tank's First Blizzard :)Tank’s First Blizzard :)

WATER DROPLET1_FOR BLOG ICONGreat photos – great inspiration to get outside for winter sports or activities in the snow with your own four-legged friends.  Have a great weekend everyone.

 

Arctic/Antarctic Photography ~ Exceptional!!!

“The Fragile Beauty of Earth’s Polar Regions” was posted to discovermagazine’s web site Fri. Oct. 31, 2014.

Our planet’s most extreme environments are also some of its most threatened. 

CAMILLEPhotographer Camille Seaman first traveled to the Arctic in 1999. Between 2003 and 2011, she visited the Arctic and Antarctic on a yearly basis, ranging from one pole to the other as an expedition photographer aboard science vessels and commercial ships.
In her new book Melting Away, Seaman collects the photographs and essays that resulted from this exploration of our increasingly fragile polar regions. Here are some of our favorites:
RUNNING TO SEE

Running to See
Of this photo, taken on the Ross Sea in Antarctica, Camille writes:
“I watched the penguins travel across the ice for hours. They would waddle and fall, waddle and slide, and little by little they came all the way over to see our massive ship wedged in the sea ice. They looked at us by turning their heads first to the left, then to the right. After thirty minutes of them looking at us and us looking at them, the penguins decided they still didn’t know what we were or why we were there. They turned around and began their long journey back to their home.”

WHALEWhale Remains
This beach in Svalbard, Norway, was used by whalers since the early 1600s. The large whale vertebra in the foreground is evidence of their activities, which ended in the 1930s.

SUNSETPainterly Sunset
This photo, taken in the Antarctic Sound, put Camille in mind of the sunsets painted by J.M.W. Turner.
“In late February, as we headed north through the Antarctic Sound, we were fortunate to experience an Antarctic sunset. The colors were epic. The sun set in front of us and was rising behind us at the same time. Truly an experience I will never forget.”

HARSH LANDSCAPEHarsh Landscape
These oil drums, photographed outside the Brazilian base in Antarctica in 2007, foreshadowed the destruction of the base in a fire in 2012. “Antarctica is an unforgiving place,” Camille says.

CRYSTAL CLEARCrystal Clear
The jaw-dropping vista of the Rasmussen Glacier in Scoresbysund, eastern Greenland.

ALL AFLUTTERAll Aflutter
Of this photo taken in eastern Greenland, Camille writes:
“As our ship passed by this iceberg, which stood some three hundred feet out of the water, the birds were disturbed enough to leave their resting spots. I love the elephant-skin quality of the surface of this berg.”

SLOW COLLISIONSlow Collision
John Palmer, a doctor from Australia, also serves as a traffic operator for the icebreaker’s two helicopters. Here, he looks off into the distance where two massive icebergs are about to collide in a strong swell. One of the helicopters (too small to see in this image) had flown out to observe the icebergs up close.

CLOUD COVERCloud Cover
Camille writes,
“Antarctica is big, but the sky is bigger. The clouds that cover Antarctica can seem enormous, and when the clouds are lit by the sun magic can happen. I tend to spend as much time as I can out on deck, always looking, always ready. On this evening my diligence was rewarded.”

WALRUSWalrus v. Hut
This hefty walrus in Svalbard, Norway, makes the nearby hut look tiny by comparison.

BLUE DIAMOND ICEBERGBlue Diamond
This iceberg, calved off the Kongsfjord Glacier in Svalbard, Norway, showed its “true colors” thanks to the overcast day.

POLAR BEARFond Farewell
Of this young bear, photographed in Svalbard, Norway, Camille writes: “She looked at us as we sat in our zodiac. The passengers were eating chocolate covered strawberries and sipping champagne from long-stemmed glasses. I wondered what she thought as she looked at us. Her mother was about a thousand feet away and raised her head every now and then to get a good whiff of her cub. She was almost two years old, almost ready to leave her mother and go off on her own. I will probably never see her again. I wished her luck as I took this photo.”

http://discovermagazine.com/galleries/2014/dec/arctic#74686

Embrace your power of gratitude ~ Inspirational video

DANCE IN THE RAIN

Sit back, relax and turn up your speakers for this inspirational movie by Mac Anderson and BJ Gallagher from Simple Truths, “Learning to Dance in the Rain”.  The words, the photographs and the music are beautiful!  Enjoy!

Learning to Dance in the Rain by Mac Anderson and BJ Gallagher can change your attitude about facing adversity.  It’s not the adversity, but how we react to it that determines the joy and happiness in our lives. Learning to Dance in the Rain shows us that while we all face challenges, embracing the power of gratitude can change your life forever.  During tough times, do we spend too much time feeling sorry for ourselves, or can we, with gratitude…learn how to dance in the rain?

“Learning to Dance in the Rain.”
“Life is not about waiting
for the storm to pass…
It’s about learning to
dance in the rain.” – Vivian Greene

 

It almost sounds too simple to feel important, but understanding the power of gratitude can change your life forever. Sarah Breathnach said it best… “When we choose not to focus on what is missing from our lives but are grateful for the abundance that’s present…we experience heaven on earth.”

Video link ~ “Learning to Dance in the Rain” below:

We all face adversity in life, it’s how you react to it that determines your joy in life. An inspiring book to guide you through life’s rough patches…Truly understanding the power of gratitude can change your life forever.

Visit Simple Truths web site for many more inspirational books and videos.  I recently purchased 2 books for my family – books arrived in just a few days and were extremely well packaged. Included with the purchase were videos and lovely gift cards decorated with coordinating graphics.

Another inspiring video to share with your families, friends and co-workers.

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDHave a wonderful weekend everyone!

Monitoring Wastewater Effluent Toxicity

Toxic Relationship 
“Researchers make advances in monitoring the potential toxicity
of contaminants in wastewater
 effluent” posted Dec. 1, 2014 by Eve Krakow in Water Canada’s November/December 2014 issue.

FIRST PHOTO NEEDS TEXT

When McGill professor and researcher OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAViviane Yargeau used to visit wastewater treatment stations to explain her work on controlling contaminants of emerging concern, municipalities were doubtful. With thousands of new compounds out there, did she really expect them to ever have the resources to monitor them all? But about two years ago, the chemical engineer shifted direction. And now, regulatoryMCGILL LOGO agencies and industrial partners are paying close attention to the work of her McGill University lab.

SECOND PHOTO NEEDS TEXT

CONTAMINANTSContaminants of emerging concern (CECs) refer to an array of compounds that have emerged over the past 10 to 20 years and are not yet regulated because their effects on human health are still somewhat unknown. They’re found in pesticides, antibiotics, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, illicit drugs, plasticizers, transformation products, nanomaterials, and much more. Whether through industrial discharge or the flush of a toilet, they end up in our water.

Monitoring toxicity

UV TREATMENT“It’s very tedious to study one compound at a time,” Yargeau said. “You study compound A, and the results say UV treatment is better. Then you study compound B and find ozonation is better. The same conditions may not be optimal for all compounds at the same time. So now, rather than focusing solely on the removal of specific compounds, we’re looking for ways to monitor toxicity of the wastewater. We no longer look at one compound at a time or at target compounds, but at whatever is in the wastewater.”

BIOASSAYSTo do this, researchers are using “bioassays”—essentially algae, enzymes, or mammalian cells—to measure how living things react from being exposed to these compounds. Different bioassays can be used to measure different effects due to different modes of actions, to determine, for example, if a water sample is estrogenic or androgenic, if it causes cell disruption, et cetera.

“Nowadays, there are so many chemicals out there, the wastewater coming into treatment plants is so complex, so unknown, that what you really want to know is the response. That is, how living organisms are being affected,” explained Meghan Marshall, a chemical engineer pursuing her Ph.D. in Yargeau’s lab.

There’s a second big reason for this new approach. Research has shown that, in some cases, when certain compounds are removed (such as through UV treatment or ozonation), they are transformed into products that might be more toxic than the original compounds. “Developing target removal levels for selected compounds might not be the way to go, because maybe these were transformed into more toxic products. As well, this approach is limited to known toxic compounds,” Yargeau said. “Therefore, rather than trying to optimize the treatment sequences to remove selected compounds, we should optimize them to remove toxicity.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWhy focus on wastewater instead of drinking water? “By improving treatment for wastewater, we ensure that anyone who takes that water as a source of drinking water will have a water of higher quality—and we protect the environment at the same time,” Yargeau said. She also noted that, while the impact on human health may still be unclear, the harmful effects on aquatic life and ecosystems have already been clearly demonstrated.

Government and industry partners

TRENT LOGOTrent University recently commissioned Yargeau’s lab to 
assess the effectiveness of a suite of cell-based assays to measure the potential toxicity of CECs in wastewater effluent.

“Essentially, these are quick, rapid tools, that are hopefully cost-effective and sensitive enough to assess the presence of CECs in the effluent,” said Monica Nowierski, an aquatic risk assessment scientist with the ministry’s standards development branch.

 GREAT LAKES BASIN2Funding for the $90,000 project with McGill comes from the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem, known as COA. One of Ontario’s commitments under COA is to promote the reduction of CEC releases, specifically from municipal sewage treatment plants. “To achieve this commitment, the ministry is partnering with academics to get information that will help to direct policy and management initiatives,” Nowierski said.

THIRD PHOTO NEEDS TEXT

AIR LIQUIDE LOGOYargeau’s lab is also working with Air Liquide Canada, a world leader in gases, technologies, and services for industry and health. The company has been looking into gas-based advanced oxidation technologies to reduce the impact of chemical and biological contaminants in industrial wastewater systems. Impressed by Yargeau’s research in this area, they initiated a joint project with McGill, along with Chris Metcalfe at Trent University, to develop NSERC LOGOalternate efficient technologies for treating municipal wastewater including ozone. The project is partly supported by NSERC over three years.

MICHAEL EPINEY“We’d like to develop a solution that will reduce CECs to the lowest possible level, starting by what is expected to be legislated eventually in Europe and North America,” said Michel Epiney, chemical engineer and business development specialist M&E at Air Liquide Canada. “At the same time, we want a solution that will provide toxicity reduction; we want our solution not to generate by-products that could be detrimental.”

BIOLOGICAL OXYGEN DEMANDWhile research on using bioassays to monitor toxicity in wastewater is still in the early stages, Yargeau said it marks a change in paradigm that is gaining favour. She notes that a similar approach already exists in wastewater management for organic materials, where biological oxygen demand is used as an indicator.

CHEMICAL METHOD“Chemical analysis is still important,” Yargeau emphasized. “But if we continue that route alone, one chemical at a time, it will never end.” Not only would this new approach be less costly and more feasible to implement, but “we would be more confident that regardless of what is in the water, we’re not missing anything, because toxicity would be a global indicator of the quality of the wastewater.”  

Eve Krakow is a freelance writer based in Montreal. This article appears in Water Canada’s November/December 2014 issue.

Harvesting rainwater for soft water use – not easy!

The following article, “Hard Water – When it comes to standards and guidelines, harvesting rainwater isn’t as easy as it looks” by Kevin Wong appeared in the May/June 2011 issue of WaterCanada

RAINWATER CYCLE HEAD ARTICLE
In the last few years, as the provinces have had to wrestle with water conservation programs, policies, and myriad associated aspects, one of many topics has posed a significant challenge: how to handle rainwater harvesting and use.

Video and images used in this blog are not part of the article.

Youtube video,”Solutions for Development: Rainwater Harvesting”, uploaded on Mar 6, 2007 ~ Dr. Kent Butler explains the benefits of rainwater harvesting ~

underground cisternThere are a number of hurdles that provincial policy makers and their municipal counterparts have to handle. First, in Canada, there is just no easy template to handle greywater and, by association, rainwater. 
CDN PLUMB ASSNHere’s why. The Canadian Standards Association (CSA) standard for the design, installation, and maintenance of non-potable water systems (as it was referenced in Canada’s National Plumbing Code) was not adequate for adoption by the provinces. It did not offer proper guidance on intended water quality, backflow, maintenance, or testing. Development of guidelines for rainwater, water treatment, and other aspects that are critically needed by the provinces and the municipalities is ongoing.
Additionally, rainwater and storm water definitions are synonymous in Canada. Each carries some connotations that make it difficult to segregate the two definitions in policy. The difficulty results in an inability to offer simplified water treatment options for PLUMBING CODErainwater harvesting. There is a glimmer of hope, however. Provinces such as Ontario, British Columbia, and Alberta have taken the leap and attempted to make these landmark changes to policy. Already there are draft changes posted for the next edition of the Ontario Plumbing Code.

RAINWATER TO POTABLE WATER

In the future, it’s hoped that the result would make it easier, policy-wise, to collect, disinfect (treat), and distribute rainwater to the home for a number of applications (some of which may not be available for treated greywater), such as showering or laundry. While the theory would be to use rainwater and appropriately treat for potable drinking water uses, the framework is not yet available in Canada.
AMERICAN PLUMB ENGINEERS Finally, the storage aspect of water storage is missing. In its rainwater harvesting guide, the American Society of Plumbing Engineers suggests that stored water does not need to be disinfected. Before disinfection for rainwater storage can be evaluated, containers would need to meet cistern or storage vessel standards like CSA B126. That standard is in the works.
wet_holding_tank_trailerThe water treatment technology to properly assess, manage, and set up water reuse systems exists. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a rainwater or greywater
grey water re-use
reuse system—what’s missing are the essential and proper standards and guidelines to bring the policy makers to a comfortable level as they mandate these systems into general policy.

cisternThere are models out there which we can turn to for best practices in the absence of these documents. We have a long way to go before we solve this challenge, but we’re working on it. 
WONGKevin Wong is the executive
director of the Canadian Water
Quality Association

Related link http://www.greenvillecounty.org/soil_and_water/pdf/rain_harvesting.pdf

Fun Friday ~ Quirky USA Town Trivia

The following article and photos were posted on Huffington Post’s “The Blog” Sept. 3, 2014 – taken from Travel+Leisure July 12, 2014 by Katrina Brown Hunt
America’s Quirkiest Towns (PHOTOS)

Paul Stone loves the colorful locals he sees on Boulder, Colorado’s downtown plaza, the no-cars-allowed Pearl Street Mall…
 That double-jointed blend is probably why the Colorado mountain town also made the top 20 for quirky locals, according to Travel + Leisure readers.
They ranked hundreds of towns for such magnetic qualities as vibrant main streets, coffee bars, and an eco-friendly vibe. And while plenty of those features may contribute to a town’s unique personality, the top 20 winners in the quirky category take it a step further. One highly ranked town is an unlikely hotbed for Tibetan monks, while another largely forgoes Valentine’s Day to celebrate Charles Darwin instead. Asheville, North Carolina, for instance, ranked highly for its booming craft beer industry and diverse dining scene — but here, “diverse” goes well beyond a few good places to eat pho. On his No Taste Like Home tour, Ashevillian Alan Muskat lets visitors forage in the woods for – and then sample – wild local delicacies like “fairy potatoes,” which grow on vines, and reishi, known as the Mushroom of Immortality. “Asheville sits smack in the middle of the most biodiverse temperate bioregion on the planet,” Muskat boasts. “So even our plants are freaky.”

No. 1 Asheville, NC
1 ASHVILLEIs it the thinner mountain air or that the locals are standing too close to a vortex? Either way, these North Carolinians are tops for eccentricity thanks to both old and new charms: the vortex-laden terrain, which purports to send off good energy; the Friday night drum circle in downtown’s Pritchard Park; and the seemingly bottomless love of local beer. To tap into their vibes, try the beer-and-moonshine “hoptails” at Grove Park Inn’s Great Hall Bar, the BRÖÖ shampoo at the Earth Fare shop, or the port cake at Short Street Cakes. Asheville also ranked in the top 10 for great bakeries; Vortex Doughnutsoffers a local beer-of-the-day donut.
No. 2 Provincetown, MA

2  PROVINCETOWN

With its history of artists and theater types—Eugene O’Neill, Al Pacino, and Barbra Streisand all cut their teeth here—Provincetown has always provided a colorful contrast to the otherwise seersuckered Cape Cod. For a suitably quirky place to stay, check in at the Salt House Inn, where each room has a “wall of curiosities” featuring vintage art or interesting objects found along the beach. The longtime gay-friendly destination also impressed readers with its seafood shacks (such as the Red Shack, which does Mexican and Moroccan lobster rolls) and cool souvenirs, such as a photo of your aura, done by Whaler’s Wharf psychic Carolyn Miller.

No. 3 Ithaca, NY

3 ITHICA

This upstate New York college town has deep hippie roots—it’s the home of legendary vegetarian restaurant Moosewood—but these are not your typical flower children. Come February, instead of celebrating Valentine’s, the town makes a big to-do over Charles Darwin’s birthday, in its Darwin Days. Thanks to the area’s Cayuga Wine Trail, Ithaca also scored in the top five for vino. Start your taste testing with Six Mile Creek, which uses grapes even for distilled spirits like its Chardonnay-based gin.

No. 4 Boulder, CO

4 BOULDER

This lovable mountain town is so outdoorsy (and granola) that each July, locals hold a Tube to Work Day. And while Colorado has recently become more famous for its smokable “herbs,” you can still explore the town’s original herbal high on a free tour of the Celestial Seasonings tea factory, or sit down for afternoon tea and samosas at the elaborately hand-carved Boulder Dushanbe Tea House, originally built in Boulder’s sister city in Tajikistan. To see why the town also ranked well for burgers, check out the grass-fed wonders at The Sink, which is completely wind-powered.

No. 5 Lambertville, NJ

5 LAMBERTVILLE

To folks in this quaint town along the Delaware River, the real weirdos may be the motorcycle riders and Wiccans across the bridge in New Hope, PA. Still, these Jersey denizens—artists, gardeners, and perhaps actors gunning to play General Washington in the next historical reenactment—get props for their serious attitude toward antiques. The four-story People’s Store has been selling treasures since 1832 (when such things weren’t old). For people-watching, go to coffee and gourmet shop Lambertville Trading Company, where the java is old-school, too: iced coffee served with frozen cubes of coffee and a full range of bone-china mugs.

No. 6 Aspen, CO

6 ASPEN

This tiny Colorado ski town attracts more than just the designer snowsuit crowd. Check out Woody Creek Tavern, one of Hunter S. Thompson’s favorite hangouts, with its sensory-overloaded walls of newspaper clippings and children’s art. Residents have a soft spot for pet lovers: the local shelter’s Rent-a Pet program lets you visit with a designated cat or dog during your stay. Aspen also ranked well for its sense of adventure, which can extend from outdoor sports to food and drink. AtZocalito’s, you can order your guacamole withchapulines (grasshoppers), and at Hotel Jerome’sJ-Bar, be sure to try an Aspen Crud, the bourbon-laced milkshake cocktail that dates back to Prohibition.

No. 7 Fayetteville, AR

7 FAYETTEVILLE

Whether you chalk it up to kookiness or school pride, this college town celebrates New Year’s each year with its own Hog Drop. The home of the University of Arkansas Razorbacks also ranked well for its sense of history: at the Clinton House Museum, you can stand in the modest little home where the former president and secretary of state once lived (and even got married, in the living room). To feel even more like an insider, stay at theInn at Carnall Hall—an elegant hotel built from a rehabbed women’s dorm—and tuck in at one of Fayetteville’s high-ranking diners, such as theRolling Pin Café, where on Saturdays you can order your biscuits with chocolate gravy.

water-dropletHope you all enjoyed your armchair travel time with us and have a great weekend.

Fight to force B. C. legislation to protect waterways

 BC SALMON The following article is taken from WaterCanada’s Mar/Apr issue; “A Legal Hotbed – Environmental groups in British Columbia are fighting to force the government into using legislation to protect its waterways” by Siobhan McClelland.
Environmental groups are testing the litigation waters in British Columbia to challenge government actions that put the marine environment at risk.

PIPELINERight now, British Columbia is a
hotbed for environmental issues, with private companies interested in using the province’s waterways as part of their operations, including fracking and natural gas businesses.

               
ECOJUSTICEBut Ecojustice, a Vancouver-based organization that represents several environmental groups, is pursuing many legal cases against the government. The organization claims the government hasn’t used its legislation or has violated its legislation, resulting in too much power being handed over to private companies that are making decisions that affect the environment.
WATERWAYS PROTECTION PROGRAMWhile there are environmental laws that provide protection for Canada’s waterways and marine life, some question how effective the legislation is.

“It’s frustrating to have legislation on the books, which the various levels of government ignore or OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAinterpret in a manner different than what was represented to the populace when proclaimed,” Maureen Bell,
(see link at end for one of Maureen’s articles on water rights) a Calgary environmental lawyer, said. “In such cases, the politicians get full points for creating the legislation, but if it languishes on the shelf or is perverted in its application, it isn’t much good.”
MARGOT VENTONMargot Venton, a staff lawyer at Ecojustice, said that people have been using the courts to try to protect the marine environment since the 1980s, when the rules changed to allow public interest parties standing, or the ability to become involved in environmental cases and bring lawsuits.

VANCOUVER COASTLINE“I think right now, in the British Columbia coast, there’s a lot of tension over how we will develop resources and what we are willing to risk in the development of these resources,” Venton said. “Some of the FISH FARMpotential resource uses, like pipelines or fish farms or whatever it is, are really placing these issues front and center in people’s minds, and we’re realizing that the threat is becoming really obvious.”
BC OIL AND GAS COMMISSIONEcojustice is currently challenging the British Columbia Oil and Gas Commission’s decision to issue short-term water approvals to fracking companies, arguing that the companies should have to go through the more stringent process of bringing water-license applications.
RANDY CHRISTENSENEcojustice staff lawyer Randy Christensen said short-term water approvals, which are usually good for two years, are being renewed by the same company five or six times. He said Ecojustice wants the companies that use water for fracking purposes to go into the water-licensing process, where the government would then assess the impact of the water withdrawals more carefully and look at the cumulative impacts of many water withdrawals in one area.
“Our concern right now is that there are really two different routes of getting the water. One has minimal oversight and one has more robust oversight,” Christensen said.
SALMON LIFECYCLEHe added that the cumulative impact of the fracking operations could affect water flow conditions in certain areas and fluctuations in water flow could affect the life cycles of fish in rivers and streams. This could possibly result in shortages at certain times of the year that would affect other people’s water use.
“These are all the kinds of things that need to go through the licensing process so that you have studies and assessments, and you know the impact of what those uses could be,”
Christensen said.
DISEASED SALMONFracking operations aren’t the only concern for Ecojustice. In another case, Ecojustice alleges diseased farmed Atlantic salmon have been unlawfully transferred into an open-pen fish farm, where the diseased fish would share water with wild fish. The claim is that FISHERIES LOGOFisheries and Oceans Canada has unlawfully given a private company the power to decide whether to transfer the diseased salmon.

Venton said decisions about the risks associated with the transfer of diseased fish should be made by the government, not private companies.
FISH FARM BEST“It’s more appropriate for the government to make the call about that risk than it is for a private individual or private company running a farm to make that call,” she said, arguing that the law doesn’t allow anyone to put fish that may carry a diseased agent into the ocean because this could potentially harm the conservation and protection of fish in the ocean.
PRIVATE CO MAKE DECISIONS“I think there is a general trend, in particular in the federal government, to get out of the business of governing,” she said, adding that this is her personal opinion. “There’s also a trend
in Canada toward deregulation and toward handing more and more power and decision making to the companies, with less and less oversight. You see that in British Columbia.”
DON'T FRACKKirsten Ruecker, a communications advisor at Fisheries and Oceans’ office in the Pacific Region, wrote in an email that the government was unable to comment on the fracking and salmon cases as these matters are currently before the courts.
ECOJUSTICE SAVE SALMON IN COURTThe fracking case does not have a hearing date yet. The salmon-farming case is scheduled for a hearing on June 9.

 

Siobhan McClelland is a former lawyer now working as a freelance journalist and the new media editor at Canadian Geographic. She has written for several law publications on a variety of topics.

Maureen Bell – “Water Rights Set To Make Waves” ~
http://www.lawyersweekly.ca/index.php?section=article&articleid=757