Tag Archives: Kanata

Wibit ~ What? ~ WOW! ~ Awesome water sport!

From time to time I will be repeating one of our more popular blogs and this one, which I published in April 2012, falls into that category. I decided to share it again as our wonderful summer weather is probably calling you to the water somewhere – enjoy!

 

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE WHO DELIGHTS IN WATER RECREATION!

 

What is Wibit?

Wibit is the brainchild or two entrepreneurs that wanted to bring fun and excitement to pools and resorts around the world. Wibit’s interlocking and standalone modules make creating and expanding your Sports Park easy. Whether you need to accommodate 10 or 100 people at a time, there’s a Wibit Sports Park that’s perfect for you.

These cool inflatable water parks produced by the German company Wibit are the real water playgrounds that take only three hours to install. Their key feature is the modular design – the costumer is able to create his own combination of modules for maximum entertainment.

The German watersports company Wibit Sports GmbH has been producing inflatable water sports products for commercial grade for over 15 years.They are distributed in over 50 countries worldwide. From Commercial Pools, Resorts, Camps or Open Water Locations. Wibit believes people everywhere should experience the excitement of play on the water.

Founded in 1997 by two friends Robert Cirjak and Romann Rademacher. The team is constantly working on new water sport creations. Inspired by a passion for sports, Wibit promotes motor skill development and social interaction through its AquaGames.

 Video link:

http://www.wibitsports.com

 

Blue City (Water Sustainable) of the future

1-BLUE CITY

The following excerpt,Blue City – What does the water sustainable city of the future look like?”, by Kirk Stinchcombe, Louise Brennan, and Jenn Willoughby is from WaterCanada Magazine, March/April 2014 issue

… Embedded in the phrase Water Sustainable City of the Near Future are four concepts:
• By city we mean a municipal environment of any size. We tend to think specifically of Canadian cities, but many of the insights would apply anywhere.
• By sustainable, we mean the capacity to endure. This includes biological systems that remain diverse and productive over time. It also implies the potential for long-term maintenance of human well-being. We think broadly and include ecological, community, and financial aspects.
• By water, we mean drinking water, storm water and waste water. We think of water quality, quantity, and availability.
• By near future, we think along variable time frames.
Some aspects of water sustainability are attainable within
as few as five years. Changes that are more difficult could
take perhaps 20 years to realize. Still others, such as
replacement of major infrastructure, may take more time…

Eight Blue City Case Studies.
Blue City is an attainable place. Many of its exemplary
characteristics are found in real cities across Canada and
around the world. The full report contains eight case
studies that describe various aspects of a water sustainable
urban environment.
ATRIUM1. Building Design (City of Victoria, British Columbia)
The Atrium Building is a seven-storey, 204,000-squarefoot retail and office building at the edge of downtown Victoria. It is a multi-award winning project with acclaimed stormwater innovations.
OKATAKS2.  Water in Decision-Making (Okotoks, Alberta)
Okotoks is a town of 24,511, located just south of
Calgary. The town has an innovative relationship
between bylaws and incentive programs to encourage continuous improvements in water conservation.
3. Blue Built Program (Guelph, Ontario)BLUE BUILT
The City of Guelph administers a certification program that provides rebates for new homes that meet an approved set of water-efficient standards, ranging from faucet aerators to rainwater harvesting systems.
4. Conservation-Oriented Pricing (Seattle)SEATTLE
Seattle Public Utilities has charged rates based on
volume for decades and has been fully metered since
1920. In 1989, it was among the first in North America to introduce seasonal surcharges.
GREEN ROOF5. Developer Incentives (Chicago)
The Green Permit Program offers progressive developers an expedited permitting process and other incentives in exchange for incorporating items from a “Green Menu” of strategies and technologies in their projects.
EPCOR6. Performance-Based Regulation (Edmonton, Alberta)
Since 2002, the City of Edmonton and EPCOR Water Services have operated according to performance based regulations, a mechanism that prevents overspending, defines expectations, and lays out
penalties in the case of under performance.
HALIFAX7. Utility Performance Measurement (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
Halifax Water is the first regulated water, wastewater, and stormwater utility in Canada. Its pressure and
leakage management program has resulted in annual
savings in operating costs of $600,000.
AUSTRALIA8. Source Substitution (Australia)
Pimpama-Coomera is a large greenfield development located on the Gold Coast in Queensland, Australia.
It has a dedicated Class A+ recycled water treatment plant and entirely separate pipe system to supply homes and businesses in the area with water suitable
for toilet flushing and garden irrigation…
Blue City offers a vision of a place where water is visible and valued, recognized as integral to the community’s economic, social, and environmental well-being…

Areas for Action
The water leaders interviewed in Blue City identified four priority areas for action: 
1 Financial Responsibility:
Sustainable utilities focus on levels of service, develop asset management plans, and embrace life-cycle costing.
In pricing services, utilities aim for full-cost recovery and structure their rates to influence behaviours.
2 Progressive Regulation and Governance:
Progressive regulations and incentivebased programs complement each other in driving performance and ultimately achieving water
sustainability goals. A well-designed utility governance structure facilitates information flow and achieves resource efficiencies.
3 Customer-Oriented Information:
Utilities measure their performance. This facilitates transparent reporting and informs planning processes. In a sustainable
city, information is shared, integrated, and audience-specific.
4 Cutting-Edge Technology:
Transformative utilities figure out how to incorporate technology
that makes source separation economically viable. Sustainable
cities have infrastructure that maintains the natural environment
and minimizes the impact of activities on native ecosystems…

The idea at the heart of the report is that the decisions
we make today will determine what the city looks like in
five, 10, and even 100 years. With a shared vision in place, taking small, frequent steps is possible. Together, we can navigate diversity and complexity, and ultimately move a real city toward a better future.
AUTHORS

Kirk Stinchcombe and Louise Brennan are Sustainability Specialists at Econics. Jenn Willoughby is Manager of Strategic Marketing and Outreach at Canadian Water Network.

The full version can be found online at http://www.blue-economy.ca. 

Chinese Acrobatic Performance ~ Excellence in Motion!

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This acrobatics performance is outstanding!

Excellence in motion!

The most impressive Acrobatics Performance I’ve ever watched!

The following YouTube video, “2014 CCTV Spring Festival Evening Year of the Horse acrobatics “Meng” Zhang Wan Li Tong” published on Jan 30, 2014  is best watched in full screen mode.

China Central Television Spring Festival, usually referred to as the CCTV Spring Festival!  China Central Television is the annual Lunar New Year’s Eve night in celebration of the Chinese New Year Gala organized variety of! Spring Festival at the scale of the show, the cast, the long-time broadcast audience ratings at home and abroad, a total world record of China Association hit most of the world’s three World Variety Show! World Chinese Association of World Records named the top-rated variety show; longest time variety show broadcast world; the world’s largest cast variety show.

This is definitely one performance that I will save for future viewing.
Please share with your family and friends.
Have a great weekend.

Canadians flushing huge energy source down the drain

1-WASTED POTENTIAL The following article, “Wasted Potential – Canadians may be flushing a huge source of energy down the drain” by Lynn Mueller was published in the March/April issue of WaterCanada magazine. DOWN THE DRAINIt has been estimated by the U.S. Department of Energy that Americans flush 350 billion kilowatt-hours of energy into sewers each year. This wasted energy would be enough to supply 30 million homes. In fact, the typical North American pours 75 litres of hot water down the drain every day. WATER EXPENSEFor a regular household, this can cost homeowners hundreds of dollars per year since water heating is the second highest source of energy demand in a home. But unbeknownst to some, it is now possible to capture 95 per cent of this wasted heat and recycle it back into our buildings using sewage heat recovery, which means the heat energy flowing down our drains never has to leave the building. Unlike solar or wind power, this technology doesn’t require a quantum shift in the way we live or the way we think—it can simply be plugged into our existing infrastructure. municipal systemWater enters heat recovery captures the heat in water leaving the building and uses it to reheat our hot-water tanks and the building itself. This technology is not complicated. First, a filter is used to separate out solids which make up about two to three percent of sewage. Then, with the help of a heat exchanger, the heat is transferred into clean water, and this warm, clean water is sent back into the building. At the end of the cycle, the clear sewer water picks up the solids extracted at the start and flushes it back into the municipal sewer system. The following Youtube video, “SHARC Energy Systems Launch Film”, was published on Jun 9, 2014 In the summer, buildings with sewage heat recovery systems can reverse their heat pumps and use the wastewater to reduce a building’s air-conditioning costs. In this scenario, the pumps extract heat from the building and transfer it through the exchanger into the sewer water. The potential reusable heat in wastewater has largely been ignored because sewage has “dirty” and negative associations. But today’s sewage heat recovery systems are hermetically sealed, meaning there is no associated smell. They are also designed to be clog-proof with an automatic back flush to filter sewage simply and effectively. Moreover, a monitoring system will flag any potential problems long before they become an issue. Sewage heat recovery is gaining in popularity with operations underway in Norway, Japan, and China’s Beijing South Railway Station. North American cities are now waking up to the fact that there is a valuable energy resource currently flowing under the city streets. Vancouver, Seattle, and Philadelphia have all started experimenting with sewage heat recovery systems. IWS LOGOIn Vancouver, International Wastewater Systems has already installed sewage heat recovery systems, called SHARCs, into several public and private buildings, including the Gateway Theater in Richmond. The Gateway installation will be the first application in Canada that will use raw wastewater directly from the municipal sewer rather than the wastewater coming out of the building. SEWAGE HEAT DISCOVERY SYSTEMAlthough sewage heat recovery systems are applicable to any building, they work best with residential buildings of greater than 200 units or with institutional buildings like hospitals and prisons that have exceptional hot water usage. The most cost-effective time to introduce a heat recovery system into a building is while doing other energy upgrades or retrofits. SEWAGE HEAT DISCOVERYThe option of using sewage heat recovery on a district-wide scale is also being explored worldwide. District energy systems are large-scale, multi-building heating projects that can supply energy over a large area using either recovered energy from other buildings, industrial sources, waste, or by burning carbon-neutral fuels. Sewage heat recovery could easily plug in to district energy infrastructure. FUEL CELL BEST  While sewage may not be as exciting as fuel cells or tidal energy, the fact that it has a payback period of two to five years makes it perhaps the most cost-effective renewable energy system currently available. Sewage heat recovery systems also work at 500 to 600 per cent efficiency, meaning that for every dollar spent on operational costs, $5 of heat is recovered. Moreover, current systems are demonstrating consistent energy saving performance of 76 per cent.

MUELLER TO CROPLynn Mueller is president of International Wastewater Systems in Vancouver.

Ana Rucner – Ode to Joy

1-ANA RUCNER CELLIST

I’m certain the you will be as delighted as I was to watch this mesmerizing and captivating video.  I know I’ve never seen this level of excellence in videography – kudos to those who created this on behalf of Croatia’s Tourism Board.

This Youtube video, “Ana Rucner – Ode to Joy” was uploaded on Nov 23, 2011 as the official video of the Croatian National Tourist Board “Ode to Joy” – Croatia – the new tourism star of the European Union. 

The video, featuring the most famous of Ludwig van Beethovan’s music – Ninth Symphony , was recorded in Ston, in Dubrovnik-Neretva County.

ANA IMAGE 2Performed by: Ana Rucner, Croatian cellist star

Ston is home to the second largest stone wall in the world and the video comes following Ana filming a music video on the Great Wall of China, which provided the inspiration for joining the two sites. The hope is that the music video will like Ana’s previous videos, bring tourists from all over the world closer to Croatia, showcasing elements of Ston’s culture and heritage , gastronomic offer, vineyards and salt works.

Ana plays modern interpretations of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, with musician Neven Kocković accompanying and shellfish harvesters from Ston also featured. 

water-dropletHave a wonderful weekend everyone and share this video with family and friends – a great way to keep in touch.

   

Baltimore Harbor Cleanup ingenuity

1-INNER HARBOR BALTIMORE

The following article, “How a Solar-Powered Water Wheel Can Clean 50,000 Pounds of Trash Per Day From Baltimore’s Inner Harbor”, by Brandon Baker, June 25, 2014 on EcoWatch (link at end of article)

 FIRST IN BLOGA large wheel has been strolling the Baltimore Inner Harbor the past month, doing its best to clean the trash that has littered a city landmark and tourist attraction.

JOHN KELLERIt’s called the Inner Harbor Water Wheel, and though it moves slow, it has the capability to collect 50,000 pounds of trash. The timing for John Kellett’s solar-powered creation is crucial—hands and crab nets simply can’t keep up with the growing amount of wrappers, cigarette butts, bottles and other debris carried from storm drains into the harbor.

The following youtube video, “Water Wheel operating in a rain storm (Baltimore, MD)”, published May 16, 2014 covers the Inner Harbor Water Wheel as it receives its first major flow of trash on the morning of Friday, May 16th.

“It looks sort of like a cross between a spaceship and a covered wagon and an old mill,” says Kellett told NPR. “It’s pretty unique in its look, but it’s also doing a really good job getting this trash out of the water.”

JONES FALLSThe wheel has become an integral part of the Healthy Harbor Waterfront Partnership Initiative. It receives power from the Jones Falls river’s current near the harbor, which turns the wheel and lifts trash from the water into a dumpster barge. A solar panel array keeps it running when there water current isn’t enough.

Graphic credit: Healthy Harbor

The wheel is now docked to the harbor. Each it runs, it removes an impressive amount of debris. So far, it has never collected less than eight cubic yards of trash.

Graphic credit: Healthy Harbor

Healthy Harbor hopes to make the body of water swimmable in less than six years, and the Water Wheel could be a big part of that. 

BILL FLOHR“The water wheel has been a time-saver for us,” said Bill Flohr, who runs Baltimore Harbor’s East Marina. “It seems to be collecting probably 95 percent of what we normally had to pick up by hand.”

I wonder if a version of this might lead to the possibility of using mega-sized solar powered water wheels to clean up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (A plastic continent) that some say is 3 times larger than the United States and 90 feet deep, and growing… 
Wikipedia – Western and Eastern Pacific Garbage Patches, sometimes collectively called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (two large masses of ever-accumulating trash). The Eastern Garbage Patch floats between Hawaii and California; scientists estimate its size as two times bigger than Texas. The Western Garbage Patch forms east of Japan and west of Hawaii.  The garbage patches present numerous hazards to marine life, fishing and tourism. 

http://ecowatch.com/2014/06/25/solar-water-wheel-trashbaltimore-inner-harbor/

 

 

Friday Chuckles ~ Gas Gouging Comics ~ ‘must share’!

Gas pricing and gas gouging topics are at the top of my hate list.  We are not getting satisfactory results from all our complaining, therefore, even though our wallets are empty we might as well have a few chuckles – some of them are hilarious!!! 

A little gasoline  humor……

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Obama Finally Solves The Gas Price Issue — Obama Parody ! – published on Mar 30, 2012

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Going somewhere this weekend -
to the cottage, on vacation, to the beach, camping, etc.?  

Loan already approved? ~ ha! ha! ha! 

Have a great one!



STOP Pipeline GAG ORDER On Mattawa citizens!

1-SILENCE1 25,000 Canadians have already stood up for free speech – the more of us join them before today’s crucial Council meeting in Mattawa, the more likely we’ll win! Pipeline giant TransCanada just secured an entire town’s silence with a $30,000 “gift” – preventing the town council from speaking out about a dangerous new tar sands pipe. But a massive uproar can still kill this dirty deal and win back the town’s voice.

Giant oil companies are fighting hard to snake these tar sands pipelines across our country – and deals like this let them plow through without resistance. But now the company is on the defensive and says that they will cut out the silencing clause “if necessary”. On Monday, Mattawa’s town council will meet and have the chance to demand they do just that. It isn’t easy to stand up to a huge corporation, but the small Ontario town of Mattawa can do it. We only have days to act! 

AVAAZClick to sign the petition, and Avaaz will deliver it straight to the city council meeting: https://secure.avaaz.org/en/dont_silence_mattawa_e/?blTFScb&v=42409 TransCanada is building its “Energy East” pipeline carrying tar sands oil just 60km east of Mattawa. In 2012 they donated money for a rescue vehicle for the town – and now a condition bars the council from publicly commenting on the pipeline. But another part of the contract gives a way out if both sides agree. On Monday, Mattawa town council can pass a resolution demanding that the silencing clause be removed – and put the pressure on TransCanada to return freedom of speech to the town. No town in Canada should be prevented from looking out for the interests of its citizens, especially in the face of pipelines that could devastate their areas with a leak. And critics say this one could hurt our climate even more than the Keystone Pipeline! TransCanada says this isn’t a gag order, that it actually protects the town from having to say nice things about the pipeline. But that’s ridiculous – the deal itself describes the ban on comments as a “benefit” the town must provide for the company. On Monday, Mattawa’s town council can stand up to Big Oil on behalf of all of Canada’s communities and say that our silence can’t be bought. Click now and tell Mattawa that we’ve got their back – YOUR VOTE WILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

Carrot Clarinet, Musical Treat ~ No Kidding!!!

CARROT CLARINET BEST

The following video, “Carrot clarinet: Linsey Pollak at TEDxSydney 2014″, published on Jun 1, 2014, is absolutely amazing – from concept through making to delivery – an amazing musical performance! Linsey Pollak turns a carrot into a clarinet using an electric drill, a carrot and a saxophone mouthpiece, and plays it all in a matter of 5 minutes.

Linsey Pollak is an Australian musician, instrument maker, composer, musical director and community music facilitator. He has recorded 31 albums, toured his solo shows extensively in Europe, North America and Asia as well as performing at most major festivals around Australia.

Linsey has devised many large Festival pieces such as “BimBamBoo” and “Sound Forest”, as well as collaborating on many music and theatre projects around Australia. He established The Multicultural Arts Centre of WA, and has co-ordinated five Cross-cultural Music Ensembles in three different States. Linsey has also worked as a musical instrument maker for 40 years and has designed a number of new wind instruments as well as specializing in woodwind instruments from Eastern Europe.

I can’t wait to make one or more of these carrot clarinets to impress my grandchildren (and maybe even some of my friends).  I guess I’ll have to keep it in the fridge – no slippery, slimy playing for me!

TEDxSydney is an independently organised event licensed from TED by longtime TEDster, Remo Giuffré (REMO General Store) and organised by his General Thinking network of fellow thinkers and other long time collaborators. TEDxSydney has become the leading platform and pipeline for the propagation of Australian ideas, creativity, innovation and culture to the rest of the world. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. 

 

California Drought Crisis affects U.S. and Canada

HOW BAD IS THIS DROUGHT GRAPHThe Nexus in Crisis – California’s drought is everybody’s problem, by Kerry Freek, is from WaterCanada’s Mar/April 2014 issue

Dangerously low river levels might be a gold prospector’s dream, but California’s drought—gearing up to be the worst in the United States on record this century—is quickly becoming a widespread nightmare.
NOAAAt the end of January, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported that water levels in all but a few reservoirs in the state were at less than 50 per cent of capacity. DROUGHT MONITORBy February, drought had affected every square inch of the state in some capacity, and the U.S. federal government announced that nearly 15 per cent of the state, and much of the farmland, is experiencing extreme conditions. On February 19, the Chicago Tribune reported that 10 communities were at acute risk of running out of drinking water in 60 days.
WATER COALITIONThis extreme drought is leading to extreme measures. California’s farmers, who receive nearly 80 per cent of the state’s water allocations, are facing significant cutbacks—and, in some cases, they’re losing water delivery completely. In February, Central Valley farmers learned the state’s largest delivery system would provide no water to the area, which produces half of the fruits, nuts, and vegetables in the United States. The California Farm Water Coalition says this means farmers will leave 500,000 acres of land unplanted in the 2014 season.
OBAMAYou can guess what that might mean for the country. “California is our biggest agricultural producer, so what happens here matters to every working American, right down to the cost of food that you put on your table,” said U.S. President Obama in an address in the same month.

SYLVAIN CHARLEBOISCanadians will feel the impact,  too. University of Guelph economics professor Sylvain Charlebois told CTV News the price of food products imported from California could soon increase by as much as 20 per cent.


Beyond just feeling the impact, Canadians also have an active role to play 
in mitigating the effects of this disaster— especially when it comes to energy.

SIGN2According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, almost 14 per cent of the nation’s hydroelectric generating capacity is concentrated in California. Lower river levels hinder the state’s ability to produce energy.
While natural gas can make up much of the difference, the drought increases demand for this resource in a time when much of the United States and Canada is (or, by the time you read this note, was) in a deep freeze.

GAS PRICES SOARThe unprecedented demand for natural gas has impacted fuel supplies, driving the price of the resource skyward. During this time of crisis, Californians are being asked to conserve both water and energy.
SIGNThat’s just the beginning for  California. The effects of the drought will be lasting, especially in the farming sector where many people have lost their livelihoods. Both state and federal governments are directing emergency drought relief funds—$687 million and $200 million, respectively—to help California residents, farm workers, and communities deal with water shortages.
CROPPED SAVE WATER LOGOWhen we talk about water and its influence, the links between it and food, energy, and the economy—call it any kind of nexus, if you prefer—become dangerously apparent. Californians, and now the rest of North America, are learning that lesson the hard way.
The urgent challenge is to move those lessons to policy and action. After significant weather events, drought and flood alike, a country’s economy takes a major hit. Follow the money and, on top of the millions of dollars for aid, these events result in higher prices for things like food, energy, and insurance, not to mention the increased threat to environmental and human health and safety.
SIGNWill this finally be the crisis that spurs us to action? Perhaps now is the time to look at—and actually begin implementing—alternative sources of power, including sewage heat recovery (see “Wasted Potential” by Lynn Mueller in the Mar/Apr issue of WaterCanada). NATURAL DISASTERS SIGNWe must apply what we’ve learned to ensure this crisis doesn’t worsen or persist. We must be open to learning from this and other disasters— and ensure our systems are resilient enough to handle what Mother Nature throws our way.

CAL DROUGHT MONITOR 2014

KERRY FREEKKerry Freek,

Editor-at-large for WaterCanada