Tag Archives: Philippines

NUDIBRANCHS UPDATE ~ INCREDIBLE FACTS AND VIDEOS

Since I first posted “NUDIBRANCHS – SAY WHAT?”,  May 14, 2012), I’ve found the time to delve further into these fascinating and exotic ocean creatures.  You will be thrilled and amazed with the facts shared on these YouTube videos and the awesome video footage from around the world (Indonesia, Philippines, Bali)

First a few very interesting facts:

Nudibranch ~ means “naked gills”
Nudibranchs ~ are sea slugs
~ are beautifully colored tiny vessels of danger
~ store toxins/stinging cells they steal from their prey
~ more than 3,000 species
~ range in length from 1/4 inch to over 1 foot
~ are hermaphrodites (meaning they have both male and female sex organs)
~ are found in oceans from Antarctica to the tropics

I won’t overload you with information, for as they say, “a picture is worth a thousand words”.

“Nudibranchs”, by Jean-Michel Cousteau, Ocean Adventures ~uploaded by on Dec 5, 2008 ~ “They might be tiny, but nudibranchs can pack a poisonous punch. Learn more about these extraordinary creatures”.

 

This next video is amazing ~ the music, “The Tahiti Trot” is very artistically adapted to the bizarre antics of the nudibranchs  ~ an award winner in my opinion!!!

Colorful nudibranchs in Lembeh Indonesia” ~ uploaded by  Delveroudis on Jul 5, 2010 ~ “… But they are the most colorful creatures on Earth and their body patterns exceed the imagination of the best designers on the planet.”

“Nudebranches of Amed – Bali Reef Divers – Dive Bali” ~ uploaded by on Nov 9, 2010 ~ courtesy of Hero Productions ~ “These nudibranches were seen around Amed and Tulamben this season… wide variety of nudibranchs species around here… Night dives at Jemeluk are also a great opportunity to see these creatures!”

http://www.balireefdivers.com

FIRST FRENCH “PEDAL POWERED” SUBMARINE: THREE VIDEOS

This is the first time I’ve tried adding a sound track to my blog and it works – thanks to soundcloud.com!  If you are enjoying the music you might like to read ‘my personal note to all my readers’ at the end of the blog before you watch the amazing videos – enjoy!

PEDAL POWERED SUBMARINE 

The world’s first pedal powered submarine, called, “The Scubster”, has been invented in France by Minh-Lôc Truong and Stéphane Rousson, a team of French designers and engineers.   The sub is powered by connecting a pedal belt to a twin-propeller system that can reach speeds of up to 8 km an hour (5 mph ). The Scubster can reach a depth of 6 meters (20 ft), ideal for peddling through rivers, and shallow ocean excursions.

france, pedal-powered submarine, submarine, yellow submarine, scubster, pedal-powered submarine, french pedal powered submarine, scubster pedal power, scubster french submarine

I have included three videos; “A Scubster Story”;  the under ice testing at Piau-Engaly in the Pyrenees mountains in France; and also one from the 2009 International Submarine Race in Bethesda, Maryland.

     Link to YouTube video, “A Scubster Story” -

      Link to Scubster web site -

http://www.scubster.org/eng-Home.html

      YouTube video of winter testing under ice at Piau-Engaly, France -

      Link to YouTube video, 10th Biennial International Submarine Races, 2009 -

Personal note to all my readers -

After checking recent stats on our blog, I am absolutely blown away by the number of readers from around the globe who are sending best wishes and comments (which of course makes my work so much more rewarding).  Countries we’ve heard from so far (all 64 of them!) are listed below.  Rainsoft of Ottawa thanks everyone for your support and for showing your appreciation of my work ‘behind the scenes’. I hope to continue posting intriguing topics that pique your interest, inspirational posts for you to share, environmental concerns that will encourage you seek information from other sources and of course water related posts (conservation, environment, health, sports, marine biology, oceanography, etc.)  It’s also great to ‘tickle your funny bone’ with some of our “Fun Friday” posts from time to time.  Make sure to take time to check through our archives – many informative, enlightening, inspiring  and humourous articles await you…

      United States, Canada, India, Poland, United Kingdom, Australia, Philippines, Germany, Pakistan, South Africa, Lebanon, Dominica,  Costa Rica, Panama, Italy, Netherlands, Croatia, Denmark,  United Arab Emirates, Slovenia, Singapore, New Zealand, Republic of Korea, Hong Kong, Mexico, Greece, Bulgaria, Portugal, Albania, Venezuela, Czech Republic, Chile, Indonesia, Brazil, Turkey, Thailand, Bahamas,  Honduras, Trinidad and Tobago, Japan, Finland, Azerbaijan, Ukraine,  Belgium, Russian Federation, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Egypt, Ireland,  Peru,  Hungary, Switzerland, Malaysia, Bangladesh, Serbia, Norway,  Morocco,  Ghana, Colombia, Saudi Arabia, Macedonia, Cameroon,  Viet Nam,  Syrian Arab Republic, Ecuador.

CORAL REEFS ARE IN CRISIS!!!

“Losing Our Coral Reefs

Excerpts from the article published in The Earth Institute, Columbia University, State of the Planet‘s blog, by Renee Cho, June 13, 2011

Before reading this you might like to watch the video included with my blog, “Great Barrier Reef” published March 6, 2012.

I urge you to read Renee Cho’s full article by clicking the link at the end of this blog.  Thank you.

Coral reefs, the “rainforests of the sea,” are some of the most biodiversity and productive ecosystems on earth. They occupy only .2% of the ocean, yet are home to a quarter of all marine species: crustaceans, reptiles, seaweeds, bacteria, fungi, and over 4000 species of fish make their home in coral reefs. With an annual global economic value of $375 billion, coral reefs provide food and resources for over 500 million people in 94 countries and territories. But tragically, coral reefs are in crisis.

Coral reefs are endangered by natural phenomena such as hurricanes, El Nino, predators and diseases; local threats including overfishing, destructive fishing techniques, coastal development, pollution, and careless tourism; and the global effects of climate change… 90% of coral reefs will be in danger by 2030, and all of them by 2050.

Coral reefs are colonies of individual animals called polyps, which are related to sea anemones. The polyps, which have tentacles to feed on plankton at night, play host to zooxanthellae, symbiotic algae that live within their tissues and give the coral its color. The coral provides CO2 and waste products that the algae need for photosynthesis. In turn, the algae nourish the coral with oxygen and the organic products of photosynthesis. The coral uses these compounds to synthesize calcium carbonate (limestone) with which it constructs its skeleton—the coral reef…

Of local threats to coral reefs, overfishing and damaging fishing techniques such as deep water trawling and the use of explosives and cyanide, are the most destructive… The global effects of climate change are also having critical impacts on coral reefs, and “the evidence is overwhelming that the ability of corals and the reefs they build to keep pace with the current rate of climate change has been exceeded” according to a recent study… When El Nino occurred in 1997-1998, widespread and severe coral reef bleaching occurred in the Indo-Pacific region and the Caribbean, killing 16% of the world’s coral reefs in 12 months… bleaching leaves corals vulnerable to disease, stunts their growth, and affects their reproduction, while severe bleaching kills them…

Today, coral reefs are experiencing warmer ocean temperatures and more acidity than they have at any time in the last 400,000 years. Acidification reduces the water’s carrying capacity for calcium carbonate that corals need to build their skeletons…It’s estimated that by 2050, only 15% of coral reefs will have enough calcium carbonate for adequate growth… Coral reefs provide us with food, construction materials (limestone) and new medicines—more than half of new cancer drug research is focused on marine organisms. They offer shoreline protection and maintain water quality. And they are a draw for tourists, sometimes providing up to 80% of a country’s total income. Losing the coral reefs would have profound social and economic impacts on many countries, especially small island nations like Haiti, Fiji, Indonesia, and the Philippines that depend on coral reefs for their livelihoods.

What can be done to save these precious and beautiful ecosystems?

The Coral Restoration Foundation protects and restores coral reefs through creating coral nurseries and transplanting corals into degraded reef areas. Concerned individuals can adopt a coral through the Coral Restoration Foundation or a coral reef through the Nature Conservancy, which uses the funds to conduct research, promote marine conservation and support the creation of MPAs. MPAs, which are being created worldwide, protect biodiversity and help communities manage resources sustainably.

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest and richest coral reef in the world because it has been protected since the early 1970s. The creation of an MPA off St. Lucia in the Caribbean has resulted in a tripling of the fish population…. by Renee Cho

http://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2011/06/13/losing-our-coral-reefs/