Wolves Change Yellowstone’s River’s Course ~ Remarkable Video


The following excerpts are from ‘How Exactly Wolves Change the Course of Rivers’ by Ray Molina of yourdailymedia.com Mar. 1, 2014

I know you’re thinking that this can’t be possible – just read on!
Just this week ViralNova posted this topic so I thought I’d republish it for those who missed it on Mar. 4, 2014.  The video is really a must see.

…Trophic cascade is when the behavior of top predators have a trickling down effect on their environment. Let’s call these predators the “one percent.”
The one percent may be vicious killing machines who think only of themselves, but even bad intentions could have good outcomes. We are finding out that their murderous ways can be useful in controlling the over population of herbivores that are eating more than their fair share, which leaves little for a multitude of other animals lower on the food chain.
Eventually there will be plenty of wolves, perhaps even too many, and at some point we may need to protect the rest of the food chain from these top predators.
But like most things, if not everything, there’s a time and a place.
I do wonder about whether or not the Ecosystems would have just found a new way to balance themselves out over time. Who knows how long that might have taken though, or maybe it’s currently happening in ways we cannot yet witness.
The main culprit of our Eco failures is you and me through our destruction of habitats through land-developing and hunting and pollution. We really blew it, and now we’re trying to cut our losses by celebrating animals that repair our mistakes.

In the video below, Author/Activist George Monbiot describes to an audience at TED the effects of Wolves that were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park in the mid 90’s.
He describes how the wolves, in a relatively short period of time, have transformed the landscape and allowed more varieties of life to flourish. And wolves did it in ways we never expected.
It’s a humbling reminder of just how connected life on this planet really is.

The original TED talk by George Monbiot, gives numerous examples of how “rewilding” our ecosystem can give us back the earth our predecessors had the privilege of experiencing.

NOTE: There are “elk” pictured in this video when the narrator is referring to “deer.” This is because the narrator is British and the British word for “elk” is “red deer” or “deer” for short. The scientific report this is based on refers to elk so we wanted to be accurate with the truth of the story.

When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable “trophic cascade” occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix.

Narration from TED: “For more wonder, rewild the world” by George Monbiot. Watch the full talk, here: http://bit.ly/N3m62h

Article link – http://www.yourdailymedia.com/post/how-exactly-do-wolves-change-rivers

Drinking Water Contaminated ~ Drugs on Tap

  DRUGS IN WATER         Scientists are re-designing pharmaceuticals and other contaminants to keep them out of our drinking water.

MAIN IMAGEMaking pharmaceuticals that degrade before they can contaminate drinking water.

DRUGS ON TAPIn recent years, researchers have realized that many products, including pharmaceuticals, have ended up where they’re not supposed to be — in our drinking water. But now scientists have developed a way to make drugs that break down into harmless compounds before they contaminate our taps.

Pub JMESTheir report appears in ACS’ journal
ACSEnvironmental Science & Technology.




PROPRANOLOLThe researchers chose to work with a commonly used drug called propranolol — a beta blocker prescribed to treat high blood pressure and to prevent heart problems. It is very stable and has been found in sewage. They made a small molecular change in its structure that didn’t affect its beta blocking activity but allowed it to break down more easily than the NON TOXICoriginal form. Further studies are needed, but initial testing showed that the altered drug and its byproducts are likely not toxic. The researchers suggest that a similar approach could be used to re-design other classes of drugs and chemicals to make them more environmentally friendly, too. 

COSMETICSA wide range of active ingredients originating from pesticides, shampoos, lotions, cosmetics, disinfectants and drugs get washed into sewage systems or rivers and streams, ending up in our tap water.

WILDLIFEScientists don’t have a complete picture yet of what effects these substances have on wildlife and human health, but they are a major concern. Researchers have detected them in low levels in streams and rivers across the United States and in other countries. To address the specific problem of medications in the environment, Klaus Kümmerer and colleagues made tweaks to pharmaceuticals so they degrade after they’ve passed through both the body and sewage treatment systems, which aren’t capable of scrubbing wastewater of all contaminants.

KLAUSDr. Klaus Kümmerer, professor of sustainable chemistry and material resources at the University of Lüneburg

The authors acknowledge funding from the German Ministry of Education and Research.


Fun Water Facts ~ Part II

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WATER GLASSYou can refill an 8 oz glass of water approximately
15,000 times for the same cost as a six-pack of soda.


DISHWASHERAn automatic dishwasher uses approximately 9 to 12 gallons of water while hand washing dishes can use up to 20 gallons.


LEAKY FAUCETIf every household in America had a faucet that dripped once each second, 928 million gallons of water a day would leak away.


COWA dairy cow must drink four gallons of water to produce one gallon of milk.


One gallon of water weighs approximately 8½ pounds.


RAINFALLOne inch of rainfall drops 7,000 gallons, or nearly 30 tons of water, on a 60′ x 180′ piece of land.


Image result for newspaper300 million gallons of water are needed to produce a single day’s supply of U.S. newsprint.


Image result for A person should consume 2½ quarts of water per dayA person should consume 2½ quarts of water per day (from all sources of water, food, etc.) to maintain health.


CHICKEN65% of the human body is water,
75% of the human brain is water.

75% of a chicken, 80% of a pineapple, and 95% of a tomato is water.

FIRST WATER PIPESThe first water pipes in the U.S. were made of hollowed-out logs.


SENTINEL352 days – record of consecutive days with no measurable precipitation in Sentinel, AZ (Feb 1901 – Jan 1902).


MOST RAIN HAWAIIThe world’s rainiest place is Mt. Wai’ale’ale, Kauai, Hawaii. During an average year, there are only 15 dry days.

LAKE TAHOEThe water in Lake Tahoe could cover a flat area the size ofCalifornia 14 inches deep. This amount of water is enough to supply everyone in the U.S. with 50 gallons of water/day for 5 years.

NEVADANevada is the driest state in the nation with an average annual rainfall of only about 7 inches


The Road to Happiness ~ Inspirational Friday


A quote from the book, “The Road to Happiness”, by Mac Anderson and BJ Gallagher: “I believe that happiness is an attitude of gratitude; and I commit to giving thanks.” 

                          Enjoy the video further down…

“Happiness depends on ourselves.” More than anybody else, Aristotle enshrines happiness as a central purpose of human life and a goal in itself. As a result he devotes more space to the topic of happiness than any thinker prior to the modern era.

“Happiness is like a butterfly; the more you chase it the more it will elude you, but if you turn your attention to other things it will come and sit softly on your shoulder.”  ~ Thoreau

“Being happy doesn’t always mean that everything is perfect.  It means that you’ve decided to look beyond the imperfections.”   ~ Unknown

“Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony.” ~
Mahatma Gandhi (1869 – 1948), Indian leader and politician

“The summit of happiness is reached when a person is ready to be what he is.” ~ Desiderius Erasmus (1466 – 1536), Dutch humanist

ARISTOTLE“Happiness depends on yourselves.” ~

Aristotle (384 BC322 BC), Greek philosopher


Let us all strive to travel  our own road to happiness
with “The Happiness Creed”.

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDHere in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada we have a long weekend to look forward to. Labour Day is also celebrated in the USA this weekend.  Were looking forward to some glorious sunny and warm weather – hope you are also, wherever home is for you and that you have been inspired by the video and plan to share with others.


World Water Week ~ Conserve Water in Homes

Image result for number of ways to save waterKITCHEN

There are a number of ways to save water, and they all start with you.

Image result for washing dishes by handWhen washing dishes by hand, don’t let the water run. Fill one basin with wash water and the other with rinse water.


Image result for dishwasherDishwashers typically use less water
than washing dishes by hand.
Now, Energy Star dishwashers save
even more water and energy. 
If your dishwasher is new, cut back on rinsing. Newer models clean more thoroughly than older ones.

REFILLDesignate one glass for your drinking water each day, or refill a water bottle. This will cut down on the number of glasses to wash.


Soak pots and pans instead of letting the water run while you scrape them clean.


Image result for garbage disposalUse the garbage disposal sparingly. Instead, compost vegetable food waste and save gallons every time.

Image result for Wash your fruits and vegetables in a pan of waterWash your fruits and vegetables in a pan of water instead of running water from the tap.



Don’t use running water to thaw food. For water efficiency and food safety, defrost food in the refrigerator.

Image result for Install an instant water heater near your kitchen sinkInstall an instant water heater near your kitchen sink so you don’t have to run the water while it heats up. This also reduces energy costs.



Image result for Keep a pitcher of drinking water in the refrigeratorKeep a pitcher of drinking water in the refrigerator instead of running the tap. This way, every drop goes down you and not the drain.


Image result for Reuse leftover water from cooked or steamed foods to start a nutritious soup,Reuse leftover water from cooked or steamed foods to start a nutritious soup, it’s one more way to get eight glasses of water a day.


Image result for Cook food in as little water as possible.Cook food in as little water as possible. This also helps it retain more nutrients.



Select the proper pan size for cooking. Large pans may require more cooking water than necessary.



Image result for drop ice cubes in a house plant instead.If you accidentally drop ice cubes, don’t throw them in the sink. Drop them in a house plant instead.




Collect the water you use while rinsing fruit and vegetables. Use it to water house plants.


WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDVisit again next week to see how we can save water in the bathroom…

World Water Week ~ Fun Water Facts

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PAISLEY SAND FILTERThe first municipal water filtration works opened in Paisley, Scotland in 1832.


CHLORINEMore than 79,000 tons of chlorine are used per year in the United States.


OCEAN WATEROf all the earth’s water, 97% is salt water found in oceans and seas. Only 1% of the earth’s water is available for drinking water. Two percent is currently frozen.

BODYAbout two thirds of the human body is water.
Some parts of the body contain more water than others.
For example,
70% of your skin is water.


PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIESPublic water suppliers process 38 billion gallons of water per day for domestic and public use.

A person can live more than a month without food, but only about a week, depending on conditions, without water.

Image result for 1 million miles of pipelines and aqueducts carry water in the United States and Canada.Approximately 1 million miles of pipelines and aqueducts carry water in the United States and Canada. That’s enough to circle the earth 40 times.


WATER WELL DRILLINGAbout 800,000 water wells are drilled each year in the United States for domestic, farming, commercial, and water testing purposes.


LAWNTypically, households consume at least 50% of their water by lawn watering.


TOILETInside, toilets use the most water,
with an average of 27 gallons
per person per day.


SAFE WATER ACTIn 1974, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act to ensure that drinking water is safe for human consumption. The Act requires public water systems to monitor and treat drinking water for safety.

PRIVATE WELLSMore than 13 million households get their water from their own private wells and are responsible for treating and pumping the water themselves.


TOXIC CHEMICAL IN WATER Industries released
197 million pounds
of toxic chemicals
into waterways in 1990.
PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES US AND CANADAThe average daily requirement for fresh water in the United States is about 40 billion gallons a day, with about 300 billion gallons used untreated for agriculture and commercial purposes.

INDOOR WATER USEEach person uses
about 100 gallons
of water a day at home.


SHOWERThe average five-minute shower takes between 15 to 25 gallons of water.


WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDThere are more fun water facts to share

– check them out next Friday.

                            Have a great weekend everyone.


Student Ke Shuai wins high praise at World Water Week in Stockholm

For 18 years, Stockholm Junior Water Prize has congregated the world’s most imaginative young minds for an outstanding competition in the capital of Sweden, encouraging their continued interest in water and sustainability issues.

Each year, thousands of participants in over 30 countries all around the globe join national competitions in hopes of earning the chance to represent their nation at the international final held during the World Water Week in Stockholm.

The national and international competitions are open to young people between the ages of 15 and 20 who have conducted water-related projects of proven environmental, scientific, social or technological significance. The projects range from local or regional to national or global topics.


Chinese student Ke Shuai wins high praise at World Water Week event

STOCKHOLMStockholm, Sweden 

The following youtube video, was published on Aug 24, 2015 by New China TV, It’s not the whims of a 15-year-old, Ke Shuai.  Instead, it’s his UAV water quality monitoring project that has stirred a sensation at World Water Week.  And it caught the attention of experts.  UAV is the short form for unmanned aerial vehicle.        



Stockholm Water Prize celebrates
its Silver Jubilee

To celebrate the Silver Jubilee of the Stockholm Water Prize, we’ve created a video that sums up 25 years of honouring extraordinary water achievements. Since 1991, the Stockholm Water Prize Laureates have represented a broad range of water-related activities, professions and scientific disciplines from all over the world. Watch and share the video!