GIANT WATER CYCLE SCULPTURE INSTALLED AT LIBRARY

GIANT WATER CYCLE SCULPTURE INSTALLED AT LIBRARY

Library sculpture
Sculptor Rik Sargent describes his piece, One World, One Water after it was set in place in front of the Bozeman Public Library Tuesday morning.
Giant water cycle sculpture installed at library By AMANDA RICKER, Chronicle Staff Writer The Bozeman Daily Chronicle
A 14-foot-tall, 1.5-ton sculpture illustrating how water connects all living things — from whales to buffalo, birds and people — will be on display outside the Bozeman Public Library through October.
The sculpture, “One World, One Water,” was trucked in to Bozeman from Loveland, Colo., this week and hoisted by crane onto a concrete pad near the library’s west entrance early Tuesday morning.
Created by Denver-based artist Rik Sargent, the sculpture depicts more than 20 habitats and 100 animals, plus other water users such as factories, to show how water flows from one user to another and back again, Sargent said.
The infinity sign-shaped sculpture “forms a continuous recycled drop of water,” Sargent said. “From the sea to the atmosphere.”
Inscriptions in the sculpture in Spanish, Apache Indian, Farsi and other languages talk about a world united as water users, regardless of religious or political affiliation.
“All water is sacred life,” states a message in Arabic taken from the Koran.
in English, the sculpture says, “Monkeys, bears, perhaps even an elephant or even a dolphin, no matter … We are all an equal part of the single drop of water.”
The Project Wet Foundation, a nonprofit water-education organization in Bozeman, and the sculpture’s owner, Colorado-based conservationist Valerie Gates, are sponsoring the sculpture’s six-month stay at the library.
During that time, the library will also offer programs about water, such as children’s workshops and lectures and Project WET will host an international water education conference, Sustaining the Blue Planet, in Bozeman in September.
Dennis Nelson, president and CEO of Project WET, said the sculpture is part of the nonprofit’s mission to educate children about the most precious resource on the planet – water.
“We believe conservation ethics and understanding needs to start at a young age,” Nelson said.
Amanda Ricker can be reached at aricker@dailychronicle.com

  Link to article – http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/news/article_f4e674d6-655a-11e0-b3d1-001cc4c03286.html

 

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