Monthly Archives: August 2013

BRITAIN’S 15 TON “FATBURG” FOUND ~ GROSS!

This event comes hot on the heels of Water Canada’s recent article “The Toilet Toll” (July/August 2013), which I posted last week on August 23.

Britain’s biggest-ever “fatberg” has been removed from a London sewer. Thames Water used the term to describe a “bus-sized lump” of festering food fat mixed with wet wipes that formed in drains under London Road in Kingston, Surrey.
YouTube video – 15 tonne blob of fat found in sewer

Gordon Hailwood, waste contracts supervisor for Thames Water, said: “While we’ve removed greater volumes of fat from under central London in the past, we’ve never seen a single, congealed lump of lard this big clogging our sewers before. Given we’ve got the biggest sewers and this is the biggest fatberg we’ve encountered, we reckon it has to be the biggest such berg in British history.”The congealed mass was so big, Hailwood says, it damaged the sewer and repairs will take up to six weeks. The blockage was discovered after residents in nearby flats complained that they couldn’t flush their toilets.

“If we hadn’t discovered it in time, raw sewage could have started spurting out of manholes across the whole of Kingston.”

Thames Water issued a press release explaining the dangers and costs of this kind of buildup, including sewage flooding homes, streets, and businesses. “When it comes to fat and wipes, please remember: ‘Bin it – don’t block it,” he adds.

 
 

STOP NESTLE’S FREE EXTRACTION OF BC WATER

BC GROUNDWATER

Water is our most precious resource.  It nourishes us, helps grow our food, and keeps our cities and forests clean.  British Columbia is endowed with some of the best water resources in the world.

So why, instead of protecting our water, are we letting companies have it for free?

Today, news broke that Nestle, one of the world’s largest food and water companies, has been bottling upwards of 265 million liters of British Columbia water EVERY YEAR…for nothing.  That is a small lake each year, gone, sold for corporate profit.

This water belongs to the citizens or people of British Columbia, and is NOT meant to be exploited by a Corporation for profit.  Call on the BC Environmental Ministry and Provincial Government to immediately change the law and force Nestle to pay a fair price for the water it sells every year.  This can’t stand.

As of August 22, 2013 4:55 p.m. we have 5,412 signatures, help us get to 10,000.

PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION by clicking on the link below – MANY THANKS!!!

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/328/443/296/stop-nestles-free-extraction-of-bc-water/

NESTLE SIGNHere’s an excellent article on this topic ~

WATER SHOULD BE A ‘PUBLIC TRUST’…

http://www.theprovince.com/news/Wild+West+groundwater+Billion+dollar+company+extracting+drinking+water+free/8785227/story.html

HALT THE TOILET TOLL↓$$$↓

TOILET TOLL

The following article, ‘The Toilet Toll’ is taken from the July/August issue of WaterCanada.  Sewer systems—and taxpayers—are paying the price for what confused consumers deem “flushable.”

If you work in a wastewater treatment facility, you know better than to flush a toilet containing anything that isn’t water, human waste, or toilet paper. Unfortunately, that’s not the case for the general public. Every day, material such as baby wipes, feminine hygiene products, condoms, dental floss, cotton swabs, diapers, hair, bandages, candy wrappers, kitty litter, syringes, rubber and plastic gloves, cleaning wipes, pantyhose, and even toothbrushes are ending up in the sewer system.

This garbage leads to blocked private drain connections, clogged sewer mains, and damage to wastewater treatment facility equipment. Those blocked sewers can also lead to basement flooding and raw sewage discharges into our streams, creeks, and rivers.

Why are toilets being treated like trash cans? There are a couple of key reasons.

Confusing terminology. Over the past 30 years, the demand for and development of personal hygiene products has increased substantially. According to the Freedonia Group, for example, demand for disposable wipes in the United States is forecast to rise 5.1 per cent per year to $2.5 billion in 2016. Wipes for personal care, household cleaning, and industry cleaning can be made from paper, tissue, or non-woven material. Manufacturers classify some products as “flushable” without a clear definition. There are also “biodegradable,” “eco-friendly,” and “natural” wipes. No wonder people are confused.

Garbage collection limitations. Until recent years, household garbage collection did not have limitations or bag limits for collection. Changes to solid waste collection, however, have resulted in user-pay bag fees and more recycling and composting education. But the education has stopped at the curb. Paying for bag fees has encouraged some people to turn to their toilets as disposal units.

The costs of toilets as trash cans:  The costs of clogging are enough to warrant the attention of every municipality across the nation. Clearing clogs could include flushing operations at the sewer main, emergency main blockage removal, damage to flooded residences and businesses, or raw sewage overflowing into creeks and rivers. At wastewater treatment facilities, workers may have to unplug equipment and remove unwanted, non-flushable material.

Turning these activities into duties can include preparing work orders, isolating equipment, cleaning equipment, and having maintenance personnel repair equipment, replace parts, and return the equipment to service—all of which take considerable time and resources.

According to the Canadian Gazette Part 2 Volume 146 Number 15, there are 3,700 wastewater treatment systems in Canada. A recent survey of some municipalities from across Ontario estimated that $80,000 is budgeted yearly for this type of operations and maintenance. Some municipalities have reported spending up to $5,000 per incident. That means, across the country, hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent fixing problems that, with a little education, could be avoided.

There are capital costs, too. Upgrading equipment like coarse screens comes at a much larger expense—usually hundreds of thousands of dollars. If municipalities think grinders are the solution, they should think again. A grinder is expensive to install and does not remove the garbage material. Instead, it creates smaller pieces of garbage that seem to collect in the most inconceivable locations. The result is unwanted surprises and removal challenges when the masses break free or grow.

Moving forward?  At a recent Municipal Enforcement Sewer Use Group (MESUG) meeting, members agreed to send letters to federal, provincial, and municipal officials identifying their issues and asking for assistance with the spiralling costs. Letters also went to major manufactures that label some of their products “flushable.”

The Canadian Standards Association hosted a meeting in February 2013 with major manufacturer members of the Association of the Nonwoven Fabrics Industry (INDA), officials from MESUG, and the Canadian Water and Wastewater Association. This meeting identified issues that misleading labels are causing for wastewater systems, and MESUG argued a third-party, regulated standard should be created for Canada. Though many Canadian municipalities have spent time, money, and resources developing and delivering educational programs detailing what is and what is not flushable, INDA suggested the problem is related to a lack of public education and awareness.

It’s clear there is an enormous cost to using a toilet as a garbage can, but it’s even more evident that municipalities need to work together to serve the public and protect the environment. Manufacturers also need to provide the public with products that are safe for personal use and marked with proper disposal instructions.

Posted on July 15, 2013, written by Barry Orr.  Barry is the sewer compliance officer for the City of London, Ontario.

For comments see:
http://watercanada.net/2013/the-toilet-toll/

Tall Tales in Curacao ~ love dolphins!!!

CURACAO DOLPHINS

The Youtube video, “Curacao Sea Aquarium Park”, published on May 18, 2012 is described as follows: ‘Plan a Curacao Sea Aquarium Park vacation for the entire family. Come and enjoy the daily tours at the aquarium with the sea lion show, get a chance to feed the sharks or just enjoy the exciting dolphin show. For the thrill seekers we have the submarine, Curasub, going to 1,000ft deep or interact with a dolphin up close at Dolphin Academy. And the end of the day you can stay in one of the rooms of the boutique hotel, the Dolphin Suites hotel, which is completely adapted to guests with special needs.’

With many thanks and much admiration, the following is a ‘reblog’ , dated July 22, 2013, from my very favorite blogger, Lesley Carter, of Bucket List Publications.

Tall Tales in Curacao.

I would love to be able to swim with dolphins ~ a lifelong dream of mine, so this trip has to go to the top of my bucket list ~ especially if it can be in this Curacao paradise.

FRIDAY FUN ~ YOUR INSTANT VACATION

This is a repost of my July 13, 2012 blog.

Click here for more graphics and gifs!LAUGHTER IS AN INSTANT VACATION” MOVIE

FROM SIMPLE TRUTHS.COM

HUMOUROUS QUOTES ON LIFE

Did you know that recent studies say that we need at least 12 laughs per day to stay healthy? We at Rainsoft Ottawa want to do our part in boosting your health factor with this presentation – lots of Ha!Ha!Has! in store for you. Have fun with the ‘tickles to you funny bone’ and enjoy your armchair ‘stress free’ vacation with quotes in the video from famous celebrities.

Click here for more graphics and gifs!The following lists just a few of the famous people quoted in the book: Joey Bishop, Zaa Zaa Gabor, Roseanne Barr, Erma Bombeck, Phyllis Diller, W. C. Fields, Cary Grant, Jerome K. Jerome, Rita Rudner, Ben Franklin, Jackie Mason, Bob Thaves, Ashleigh Brilliant, Robert Orben, Tommy Cooper, Bill Cosby, Henny Youngman, Cathy Guisewite

Click here for more graphics and gifs!Comments from simpletruths.com site about the book, ‘Laughter is an Instant Vacation’ ~ “They say laughter is the best medicine. In fact, studies show that we need a minimum of 12 laughs a day…just to stay healthy. ‘Laughter is an Instant Vacation’ can deliver 250 of them. Paired with funny photos, these quotes are guaranteed to give you an attitude boost or provide a laugh when you need it most. So, put the fun back in your life with ‘Laughter is an Instant Vacation’…

Click here for more graphics and gifs!Knowing I won’t be disappointed with the content, I plan to order this book to keep handy on the coffee table for our daily chuckles ~ thanks to Simple Truths.

Click here for more graphics and gifs!As usual, I encourage you to share this video with your family, friends and co-workers.

CELL PHONE SIGNALS ABSORBED BY WATER

DROPPED SIGNALS1

YouTube video experiments to explain cell phone signals absorbed by water and cell tower RF absorbed by water:

 

The following article, “Dropped Signals”,  is from WaterCanada’s March/April 2013 magazine issue.
What do phone calls have to do with raindrops?  Water absorbs cell phone signals.  RAINFALL ATTENUATESBased on that premise, a group of researchers in the Netherlands set out to see if cellular network data, collected over several days, could give an accurate estimate of how much rain fell in an area.  They found that data from the cell networks closely matched ground-based observations.
ATTENUATION BETWEEN CELL TOWERS“For a long time — decades, even from the sixties — we’ve known that rainfall can attenuate signals in telecommunication, but microwave links from cellular communication networks are of course relatively new,” AART OVEREEMsays Aart Overeem, weather service research and development, Wageningen University.  His team’s research builds upon previous research from Israel and the Netherlands.
Here’s how it works.  MOBILE PHONE ANTENNAS“Electromagnetic signals are transmitted from the antenna of one telephone tower to the antenna of another telephone tower,” says Overeem.  “In case of rainfall the signal is attenuated, which can be seen from a decrease in the received signal power at one end of such a microwave link.  From the decrease in the received signal level during rainy weather compared to the signal level during dry weather, the path-averaged rainfall intensity between the antennas can be estimated.”
WEATHER DATAOvereem says that networks could be used to gauge important climate rainfall data, especially in areas without ground based monitoring, which includes rain gauges and weather radar data.
Rainfall estimates from cellular communication networks could help to improve the number of surface rainfall observations, which could become important for agriculture and food production, water management, climate monitoring, et cetera,” says Overeem, who emphasizes that microwave link data are not meant to as a replacement, but as an addition to existing observational systems.

U of WATERLOOThe University of Waterloo has done similar work using GPS signals.

FRANK SEGLENIEKSFor an interview with Dr. Frank Seglenieks, UW’s weather station coordinator, visit watercanada.net.
—Staff

RAINFALL_MICROWAVE TOWER

RIVER OF LIGHT CELEBRATION ~ ALBERTA, CANADA

WEB SITE COLLAGE

RIVER OF LIGHT LOGOShifting and evolving as it travels to rivers throughout the world, the River of Light has gained local and international recognition through its ability to not only engage communities to participate in the work, but also to highlight the importance of river preservation and water conversation on a global scale.  The River of Light is a world touring art installation by Creatmosphere that combines floating lights, sound and new technologies to celebrate the rivers of the world through public art.

River of Light Art project on the Bow River in Calgary August 2010, Artist: Laurent Louyer.  Photo slideshow to start with video clip of colour changes starting at 1:31 and then a few more images.  Music by Roger Subiranan Mata, “Point of No Return”, available through a creative commons license on http://www.jemendo

RED DEER RIVER2013 marks the 100th birthday of the City of Red Deer and to celebrate this the Red Deer River will become the territory and stage for a series of daylight sculptural and sound installations and night-time light and video interventions that aim to create new Points of View for the community to discover and engage with their city and river.

Web: www.riveroflight.org
The River of Lights: Points of View has been commissioned by the
Central Alberta Historical Society for the Red Deer City Centennial.

Associated link ~http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/river-of-light