Monthly Archives: October 2014

Win a trip to Kennedy Space Center

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MAGAZINE LOGOAstronomy Magazine & Kennedy Space Center Sweepstakes —
Total Prize Value: $6,425!

Win round-trip airfare, hotel accommodations, and admission to Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex for four including a behind-the-scenes tour, lunch with an astronaut, and a meteorite collectible.
Open only to residents of the USA and Canada (except Quebec).

CENTER4  CENTER1    CENTER5

HURRY! Enter Sweepstakes
– before November 30th.

http://sciencecontests.secondstreetapp.com/Win-a-trip-to-the-Kennedy-Space-Center/Enter

IMAGE1Each year, more than 1.4 million guests from around the world experience their own space adventure by exploring the past, present and future of America’s space program at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. This Visitor Complex opened on August 1, 1967 in response to public interest and demand to see our space program up close. This was at the time NASA was preparing to launch the first astronauts to the moon. In 1995 Delaware North Parks and Resorts, Inc. began managing the 70-acre facility. They have redeveloped and enhanced this facility to make it one of Central Florida’s most popular tourist destinations. KSC visitor complex offers IMAX films, live shows, hands-on-activities, behind the scenes tours, lunch with an astronaut, and its newest attraction, The Shuttle Launch Experience. The facility offers great shopping, dining, education programs, and sometimes even launches, and it is entirely self-supported. It receives no taxpayer or government funding.

CENTER5Excellent overview of Center link ~ http://www.cruisemates.com/articles/feature/KennedySpaceCenter-122607.cfm

Good luck to all who enter.

Have a scare-riffic Halloween and great weekend!

 fireghost FIREY LETTERS

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Colorado River ~ most endangered U.S. river

1-COLORADO RIVER BESTThe following Youtube video was published on Apr 16, 2013 by Pete McBride.

The Colorado River is a lifeline in the desert, its water sustaining tens of millions of people in seven states, as well as endangered fish and wildlife. However, demand on the river’s water now exceeds its supply, leaving the river so over-tapped that it no longer flows to the sea.

Alexandra Cousteau says, “With the ongoing drought in the West, this beautiful short film really hits home how fragile our water really is.”

It runs through seven states, nourishes nearly four million acres of farmland, and has flowed for more than six million years, yet the Colorado River, which supplies drinking water for thirty-six million people, is the most endangered river in America.

The following Youtube video, “The Colorado River in peril” by GeoBeats News, was published on Apr 22, 2013

The Colorado River was named the most endangered waterway in the US by American Rivers, a US environmental protection organization. They cited overuse, drought, and outdated management as its top threats. American Rivers’ president Bob Irvin said, “The Colorado River…is so over-tapped that it dries up to a trickle before reaching the sea.” The waterway runs through seven states and into Mexico. It supports the daily needs of 36 million people and the irrigation of the 4 million acres of land that produce 15 percent of the nations crops. Local flora and fauna (1,5,1) and a large recreational industry also rely on its well-being.

Link – excellent in-depth background on topic ~ 

link for Keep the Colorado Flowing ~

http://www.americanrivers.org/newsroom/resources/colorado-river-americas-most-endangered-river-2013/

Living Life Well ~ Commandments

LIFE LESSONS LOTUS IN WATER

The meaning of a lotus flower ranges from divine purity and enlightenment, as in Buddhism, wealth, as in Hinduism, to rebirth, as in the ancient Egyptian religion. Many of the ancient meanings are still in use today.

RULE 1ONE ~
Give  people more than they expect and do it  cheerfully.

RULE2TWO ~
Marry  a man/woman you love to talk to. As you get  older, their  conversational skills  will be as important as any  other.

RULE3THREE ~
Don’t  believe all you hear,
spend all you have
or  sleep all you  want.

RULE4 CROPFOUR ~
When  you say,
‘I love you,’ mean  it.

rule5add textFIVE ~
When  you say, ‘I’m sorry,’
look the person in the  eye.
      

 

ENGAGEMENT CROPSIX ~
Be  engaged at least six months
before you get  married.

 

LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT SEVEN ~

Believe  in love at first  sight.

LAUGH AT DREAMEIGHT ~
Never  laugh at anyone’s dreams.
People who  don’t have dreams don’t have  much.

1-LOTUS FLOWERNINE ~
Love  deeply and passionately.
You might get  hurt but it’s the only way to live life  completely

TENTEN ~
In  disagreements, fight fairly.
No name  calling.

 

ELEVENELEVEN ~
Don’t  judge people
by their  relatives.

THINK SLOWTWELVE ~
Talk  slowly
but think  quickly.

THIRTEENTHIRTEEN ~
When  someone asks you a question you don’t want to  answer,
smile  and ask, ‘Why do you want to  know?’

FOURTEENFOURTEEN ~
Remember  that great love and great achievements involve  great  risk.

FIFTEENFIFTEEN ~
Say  ‘bless you’
when you hear someone  sneeze.

SIXTEENSIXTEEN ~
When  you lose,
don’t lose the  lesson.

SEVENTEENSEVENTEEN ~
Remember  the three R’s:
Respect for self;
Respect for  others;
and Responsibility for all your  actions.

EIGHTEENEIGHTEEN ~
Don’t let a little dispute
injure a great friendship.

NINETEENNINETEEN ~
When  you realize you’ve made a mistake, take  immediate steps to correct  it.

PHONE SMILETWENTY ~
Smile  when picking up the phone.
The caller will hear  it in your  voice.

TIME ALONETWENTY-  ONE ~
Spend  some time  alone.

 

TRUE FRIEND ENDINGA  true friend
is someone who reaches for your hand
and touches your  heart.

Fun Friday ~ Quirky USA Town Trivia Part 3

The following article, “America’s Quirkiest Towns”,  is the 3rd part of Huffington Posts’ ‘The Blog’ article posted by Katrina Brown Hunt, taken from Travel+Leisure  Sept. 3, 2014.
America’s Quirkiest Towns (PHOTOS)

Paul Stone loves the colorful locals he sees on Boulder, Colorado’s downtown plaza, the no-cars-allowed Pearl Street Mall…
 That double-jointed blend is probably why the Colorado mountain town also made the top 20 for quirky locals, according to Travel + Leisure readers…

Doylestown, PA

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In the heart of history-rich Bucks County, there’s a fine line between quirkiness and extreme quaintness: cutting-edge souvenirs include the locally grown sachets from the Peace Valley Lavender Farm. Doylestown also ranked well for its fairs, such as the annual Polish Festival, held at the National Shrine of Our Lady of Czestochowa (a Black Madonna sometimes seen as a subversive), and the crowd-pleasing Beer Fest, held at the town’s former estate, Fonthill Castle. Readers also applauded Doylestown for brunch: try the Purgatory Plate (poached eggs over slow-cooked sweet onions, plum tomatoes, and Grana Padano cheese) at local favorite Domani Star.

Lawrence, KS

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This Kansas town made the top 20 for embracing those who aren’t afraid to make public spectacles. Each summer brings the Lawrence Busker Festival, featuring sword swallowers and fire dancers, and every Christmas the fire department makes a show of rescuing Santa off the roof of Weaver’s Department Store. Year round, Lawrence supports the Museum of the Odd, whose curator has collected such fascinating exhibits as celebrity toothbrushes, ashtrays made from animal limbs, and roughly 600 sock monkeys. It also ranked highly for its ice cream, such as the cookie-and-candy-filled Kansas Twister scoops at Sylas and Maddy’s.

Snowmass, CO

16 Snowmass, CO

This ski town landed in the survey’s top 10 for being friendly and smart, but quirky isn’t too far behind. After all, it seems locals have a habit of attaching stuff to trees. The Sanctuaries in the Snow tour, led by a retired attorney, will take you to see the area’s best mysterious shrines—elaborate homages in the woods devoted to, say, Jerry Garcia, golf, or Snoopy. Past quirky residents, meanwhile, have included at least one woolly mammoth; a tusk was excavated a few years ago in Snowmass Village and can now be seen, along with other local fossils, at the town’s Ice Age Discovery Center.

Greenville, SC

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The most iconic site in this Blue Ridge town is truly off-kilter: Liberty Bridge, in Falls Park, a pedestrian bridge whose 90-foot-tall masts tilt an eye-catching 15 degrees. If you’re not feeling woozy afterward, stop in at the Dark Corner Distillery, the state’s first legal moonshine operation, where you can taste the Butterscotch Shine or the chipotle-and-cinnamon Hot Mama, and learn to make your own hooch back at home. Readers also liked the casual dining scene: at Papi’s Tacos, the off-the-menu favorite is the Walking Taco, a loaded bag of Doritos and a fork. Locals may enjoy it ironically, since Greenville also placed in the top 10 for being hip.

Franklin, TN

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This charming town south of Nashville dances to it own beat, winning the survey for its un-countrified festivals, such as its summer Jazz Festival and winter’s Dickens of a Christmas. Franklin also won the survey for its cool souvenirs. You might go home with bottles of brisket marinade and denim coozies from Puckett’s Grocery, or rare volumes from Landmark Booksellers, whose building dates back to 1798 and reportedly houses some busy ghosts. Around here, that’s not so unusual: Franklin’s present-day locals scored well in the survey for staying active.

Amelia Island, FL

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There’s a fickle backstory to this little island town: it has belonged to eight different nations, and today offers a fun-loving blend of Deep South and island culture. The town ranked highly in the survey for historic inns like the Victorian-era Hoyt House andWilliams House and for its family-vacation appeal. For a one-of-a-kind activity with the kids, take Amelia River Cruises’ Eco-Shrimping Tour, where you get to catch (then release) the little shellfish.

Beaufort, NC

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While some towns do Civil War reenactments, Beaufort does an annual re-creation of a 1747 showdown between pirates and feisty town locals. That swashbuckling sense of excitement still lives on. Readers loved this Inner Banks town for its romantic places to stay—such as The Cedars Inn, which has hosted seafaring types as far back as the late 1700s – and its live music. To hear the best local musicians, go to the Backstreet Pub, where Wednesday nights are “Hoot Nights,” and during downtimes, patrons are welcome to play cribbage at their tables.

water-dropletHope you all enjoyed your armchair travel time,
Parts 1,2,3 with us.

Get out and enjoy nature’s autumn bounty this weekend. 

Villages sunk during St. Lawrence Seaway

1-SEAWAY SUNKEN VILLAGES

Many thanks to gizmodo.com’s Geoff Manaugh who posted the following article, “Haunting Aerial Photographs Of Drowned Villages In Canada”, 23 October, 2013

Haunting Aerial Photographs of Drowned Villages in Canada

Louis Helbig is cataloging aerial photographs of Canadian villages drowned by the construction of the St Lawrence Seaway on his website Sunken Villages. The photos are haunting and gorgeous, almost emerald-like, but often difficult to read. Outlines of houses and roads barely emerge from the silt like scenes from a dream by J.G. Ballard, or flooded stage sets in the water that, in some photos, are lazily criss-crossed by boats.

The shot seen above, featuring a “barn with octagonal silo“, or the photo simply described as two buildings in Riverside Heights — an overly optimistic name for a town that now finds itself underwater — exemplify the dreamlike nature of the scenes.

Some of the lost architectural features of the region are now SCUBA-diving attractions, Helbig explains.

Haunting Aerial Photographs of Drowned Villages in Canada

Two Buildings Riverside Heights” by Louis Helbig.

Helbig relays the extraordinary history of these villages on his site, including a brief introduction to the dispersed former residents who still refer to things like “Inundation Day” as a perverse local anniversary.

Haunting Aerial Photographs of Drowned Villages in Canada

Down Altsville East to West” by Louis Helbig.

“The St. Lawrence Seaway was the largest industrial project of its time,” he writes. “A feat of unprecedented industrial accomplishment, it eliminated the powerful Long Sault Rapids and opened the Great Lakes to the ocean-going vessels of its era. In the rapids’ place, Lake St. Lawrence became the headwater for a massive hydroelectric dam.”

Haunting Aerial Photographs of Drowned Villages in Canada

Doran Point Buildings in May” by Louis Helbig.

LOUIS HELBIGThe project began purely by accident, while flying over a body of water and looking down, spotting the outlines of architecture in the shallows below:

The first path began in the air in late 2009 when, flying over the St. Lawrence River, I spotted, quite by chance, a rectangular outline in the clear, blue-green water. At first I didn’t quite believe what I thought I was seeing — I had never heard of such a thing as houses, let alone whole communities, under water in Canada and the United States. A few turns later, I found a road and some more foundations; the entire thing snapped into place with a sidelong glance at the dam in the distance between Cornwall, Ontario, Canada and Massena, New York, USA.

Deciding both to memorialize and, in a sense, to warn others about the experience of loss these artificial floods have led to, Helbig’s project is both abstract and documentarian — and, even better, it is currently on display at the Marianne van Silfhout Gallery at St. Lawrence College, so you can see the photos in person. The show closes on November 2.

Haunting Aerial Photographs of Drowned Villages in Canada

Downtown Aultsville” by Louis Helbig.

Browse the lost villages on Helbig’s site, and check out Gizmodo’s own brief survey of drowned towns.