Category Archives: Photography

Wolves Change Yellowstone’s River’s Course ~ Remarkable Video

WOLVES

The following excerpts are from ‘How Exactly Wolves Change the Course of Rivers’ by Ray Molina of yourdailymedia.com Mar. 1, 2014

I know you’re thinking that this can’t be possible – just read on!
Just this week ViralNova posted this topic so I thought I’d republish it for those who missed it on Mar. 4, 2014.  The video is really a must see.

…Trophic cascade is when the behavior of top predators have a trickling down effect on their environment. Let’s call these predators the “one percent.”
WOLVES LARGE ANIMALS
The one percent may be vicious killing machines who think only of themselves, but even bad intentions could have good outcomes. We are finding out that their murderous ways can be useful in controlling the over population of herbivores that are eating more than their fair share, which leaves little for a multitude of other animals lower on the food chain.
WOLVES WATER MAMMALS
Eventually there will be plenty of wolves, perhaps even too many, and at some point we may need to protect the rest of the food chain from these top predators.
WOLVES WATER BIRDS
But like most things, if not everything, there’s a time and a place.
WOLVES WATERFALLS
I do wonder about whether or not the Ecosystems would have just found a new way to balance themselves out over time. Who knows how long that might have taken though, or maybe it’s currently happening in ways we cannot yet witness.
WOLVES SCENES
The main culprit of our Eco failures is you and me through our destruction of habitats through land-developing and hunting and pollution. We really blew it, and now we’re trying to cut our losses by celebrating animals that repair our mistakes.

In the video below, Author/Activist George Monbiot describes to an audience at TED the effects of Wolves that were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park in the mid 90’s.
He describes how the wolves, in a relatively short period of time, have transformed the landscape and allowed more varieties of life to flourish. And wolves did it in ways we never expected.
It’s a humbling reminder of just how connected life on this planet really is.

The original TED talk by George Monbiot, gives numerous examples of how “rewilding” our ecosystem can give us back the earth our predecessors had the privilege of experiencing.

NOTE: There are “elk” pictured in this video when the narrator is referring to “deer.” This is because the narrator is British and the British word for “elk” is “red deer” or “deer” for short. The scientific report this is based on refers to elk so we wanted to be accurate with the truth of the story.

When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable “trophic cascade” occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix.

Narration from TED: “For more wonder, rewild the world” by George Monbiot. Watch the full talk, here: http://bit.ly/N3m62h

Article link – http://www.yourdailymedia.com/post/how-exactly-do-wolves-change-rivers

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The Road to Happiness ~ Inspirational Friday

THE ROAD TO HAPPINESS – BEAUTIFUL AND INSPIRING MOVIE

A quote from the book, “The Road to Happiness”, by Mac Anderson and BJ Gallagher: “I believe that happiness is an attitude of gratitude; and I commit to giving thanks.” 

                          Enjoy the video further down…

“Happiness depends on ourselves.” More than anybody else, Aristotle enshrines happiness as a central purpose of human life and a goal in itself. As a result he devotes more space to the topic of happiness than any thinker prior to the modern era.

“Happiness is like a butterfly; the more you chase it the more it will elude you, but if you turn your attention to other things it will come and sit softly on your shoulder.”  ~ Thoreau

“Being happy doesn’t always mean that everything is perfect.  It means that you’ve decided to look beyond the imperfections.”   ~ Unknown

“Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony.” ~
Mahatma Gandhi (1869 – 1948), Indian leader and politician

“The summit of happiness is reached when a person is ready to be what he is.” ~ Desiderius Erasmus (1466 – 1536), Dutch humanist


ARISTOTLE“Happiness depends on yourselves.” ~

Aristotle (384 BC322 BC), Greek philosopher

 

   
Let us all strive to travel  our own road to happiness
with “The Happiness Creed”.

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDHere in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada we have a long weekend to look forward to. Labour Day is also celebrated in the USA this weekend.  Were looking forward to some glorious sunny and warm weather – hope you are also, wherever home is for you and that you have been inspired by the video and plan to share with others.

 

Student Ke Shuai wins high praise at World Water Week in Stockholm

For 18 years, Stockholm Junior Water Prize has congregated the world’s most imaginative young minds for an outstanding competition in the capital of Sweden, encouraging their continued interest in water and sustainability issues.

Each year, thousands of participants in over 30 countries all around the globe join national competitions in hopes of earning the chance to represent their nation at the international final held during the World Water Week in Stockholm.

The national and international competitions are open to young people between the ages of 15 and 20 who have conducted water-related projects of proven environmental, scientific, social or technological significance. The projects range from local or regional to national or global topics.
SIWI

CHINESE STUDENT

Chinese student Ke Shuai wins high praise at World Water Week event

STOCKHOLMStockholm, Sweden 

The following youtube video, was published on Aug 24, 2015 by New China TV, It’s not the whims of a 15-year-old, Ke Shuai.  Instead, it’s his UAV water quality monitoring project that has stirred a sensation at World Water Week.  And it caught the attention of experts.  UAV is the short form for unmanned aerial vehicle.        

                                                                      

SWP-Sculpture-1

Stockholm Water Prize celebrates
its Silver Jubilee

To celebrate the Silver Jubilee of the Stockholm Water Prize, we’ve created a video that sums up 25 years of honouring extraordinary water achievements. Since 1991, the Stockholm Water Prize Laureates have represented a broad range of water-related activities, professions and scientific disciplines from all over the world. Watch and share the video!

http://siwi-mediahub.creo.tv/prizes-and-awards/stockholm-water-prize/stockholm_water_prize_celebrates_its_silver_jubilee

Armchair Travel ~ Horseback ~ Canada’s Great Divide

Image result for great divide

Riding the Great Divide

Photos from a journey through K-Country on horseback by Sabrina Doyle

Kananaskis Country is a giant scenic playground covering 4,257 square kilometers of the Rocky Mountain foothills. There are many ways to explore the region, but Andre Prefontaine chose to venture offroad on horseback (look for his story in the September 2015 travel issue of Canadian Geographic). Guiding him was the charismatic Dewy Matthews of Anchor Doutfitters. For seven days the group moved through the Highwood Range to the Continental Divide and into British Columbia. Here’s a glimpse into their trip.

The group makes their way up to Fording River Pass, along the continental divide, before crossing into British Columbia. After leaving the tree line behind they reached a large stony area where a patch of petrified horn coral dating back to the mid-to-late Cretaceous period, some 66 to 140 million years ago. (Photo courtesy Janet and Mike Michaud)

The group reaches British Columbia after crossing the continental divide. (Photo courtesy Janet and Mike Michaud)

Dewy scans the horizon on day 3, from the summit of a mountain he called the Strawberry Hills. (Photo courtesy Janet and Mike Michaud)

Atop the Strawberry Hills. (Photo courtesy Janet and Mike Michaud)

Lunch break on the summit of the Strawberry Hills afforded breathtaking 360 degree views of the valleys below. (Photo courtesy André Préfontaine/Canadian Geographic)

An early morning view of Mount McPhail through the mist. Taken at the third and final base camp along McPhail Creek. (Photo courtesy André Préfontaine/Canadian Geographic)

Photo courtesy André Préfontaine/Canadian Geographic

Three chuck wagons follow the Highwood River as the group makes their way out of the mountain back to High River Junction on the last day of the ride. The wagons contain all the gear and food for the seven-day ride. (Photo courtesy André Préfontaine/Canadian Geographic)

Dewy stands on a fossil patch on the way up to the Fording River Pass. (Photo courtesy Christine Thomas)

Dewy rides to the top Fording River Pass. (Photo courtesy Christine Thomas)

http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/travel/travel_magazine/sep15/great-divide-ride.asp

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDHope you enjoyed your horseback photo adventure                         into the great mountains of Canada. 

 Have a great weekend everyone – get out and enjoy some of your local events now that the extremely hot                                                  temperatures seem to be behind us.

World Elephant Day ~ Awesome videos and photos!!!

Baby Elephant Chasing Birds is Only Video You Need on World Elephant Day by Helaina HovitzAugust 12, 2015, as posted to http://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/ 

In honor of World Elephant Day, we are trumpeting the best videos on the web showing these adorable babies using their trunks to play.

No matter how many you watch, nothing beats this video (above) of a baby elephant discovering baby birds for the first time.

If you want more—and how could you not—check out these other elephant babies at play:

Baby Elephant Swirls a Ribbon Just Like a Child

At the Elephant Nature Park juveniles regularly engage in cute behavior. Watch Faa Mai enjoying her playtime with a steaming ribbon.

After Years Apart, Watch This Mother Elephant Reunite With Her Baby

Baby MeBai was only three years old when taken from her mother, Mae Yui, and forced to give rides to tourists in Thailand. Too young and small for the job, the young animal steadily lost weight until she could no longer carry passengers. Elephant Nature Park stepped in, rescuing MeBai with their “Pamper a Pachyderm” program. The reunion with its mother was a lovefest of touching and cuddling.  (READ More here)

Baby Elephant Throws a Tantrum

This Little Elephant Loves Cuddling with Humans, Particularly Arthur

World Elephant Day, by Alan Taylor as posted to http://www.theatlantic.com/

Since 2011, August 12 has been set aside as World Elephant Day. Supported by numerous conservation agencies, it’s a day to “spread awareness, share knowledge, and provide solutions for better care and management of both captive and wild elephants,” according to the organizer’s website.

Elephants face numerous challenges, including poaching, habitat loss, exploitation, abuse, and proximity to human conflict and poverty. The International Union for Conservation of Nature lists African elephants as “vulnerable” and Asian elephants as “endangered.” On this World Elephant Day, I present a collection of images of these amazing animals. 

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDI think that the following photo collection is  amazing, comprehensive, and ‘tug at your heart’ and worthy of awards galore!!!  I’ve only included a few of his remarkable photos today.

Melbourne Zoo’s newest Asian elephant receives a nudge from her mother after going on display to the public for the first time on February 10, 2010.
A herd of adult and baby elephants walks in the dawn light with the highest mountain in Africa, Mount Kilimanjaro, in the background, in Amboseli National Park, southern Kenya, on December 17, 2012.

Elephants spray villagers with water during the Songkran water festival in Thailand’s Ayutthaya province, north of Bangkok, on April 10, 2015.

A five-month-old-orphaned elephant named Tembo plays with his keeper, Thomas Chalice, who has nurtured the elephant at Tony Fitzjohn’s Mkomazi rhino sanctuary in Mkomazi, Tanzania, on June 19, 2012.

An aerial picture taken on April 5, 2013, shows the main herd of elephants in Zakouma National Park, 800 kilometers east of N’Djamena in Chad. Ninety percent of the elephants of the park have been poached in the last decade.

A seven-and-a-half-month-old orphaned elephant calf named Moses cuddles with his adoptive “mother” and foundation owner, Jenny Webb, at sunrise at their home in Lilongwe, Malawi, on October 9, 2012. Moses was found alone and close to death in the Vwaza Marsh Wildlife Reserve.

A three-day-old African elephant stands beside an older elephant at the Tierpark zoo in Berlin, Germany, on May 23, 2007.

Enjoy Allan’s full gallery at http://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2015/08/world-elephant-day/401117/#

Nature Canada Photo Contest still open

There’s still time for all you amateur, professional or youth photographers to enter your favorite wildlife photo in Nature Canada’s 2015 photo contest.  The deadline is August 14th this year. The contest categories are: Canadian Landscape, People in Nature, Nature in Action, Fauna & Flora, Nature Nearby and Favorite Memory in Nature.

1-NATURE CANADA PHOTO CONTEST

Get your cameras ready… Nature Canada is happy to announce the launch of its 2015 Photo Contest!

Early Bird draw winner, a photo from Cyndy JohnsonLast year’s 75th Anniversary Photo Contest was a huge hit. We received over 3,000 entries and the top photos were featured in our 75th Anniversary Calendar as well as at the Canadian Museum of Nature!

Starting May 19th and running until August 14th, we will be accepting photo entries which capture the beauty of Canadian nature all around us. Special prizes from our generous supporters are available for the winners who will be announced.

Our top prize, generously donated by Copper Cayuse Outfitters, is a trip for two on their Historic Li-lik-hel Mine Expedition. According to their website, you will get to ride on trails that were originally cut by the miners and have been pounded in by years of horses transporting the gold ore to the rail-head in the early 1900’s. You’ll spend three days and two nights in BC’s spectacular Coast Mountain Range, exploring  the beautiful mountain range between Birkenhead Lake and the Li-lik-hel mine. Recently, this expedition has been officially designated as a Canadian Signature Experience! Read about the experience here.

In case you were looking for inspiration, we’ve created a variety of categories into which you can submit your photo(s)!

  • Canadian Landscape
  • People in Nature
  • Nature in Action
  • Fauna & Flora
  • Nature Nearby
  • Favorite Memory in Nature

There will be Early Bird draws, so get your submissions in early! See our rules and regulations for more information. Congratulations to Cyndy Johnson, winner of the first Early Bird draw of the 2015 contest!

It is our hope that by spending time in nature you will experience and learn about the natural beauty our country has to offer. So get up, get outside, and enjoy the great outdoors!

How to Submit

Make sure to always include the category into which you would like to submit your photo! We would also love to hear the story behind the shot!

Make sure to always identify yourself as either an Amateur, Professional, or Youth photographer.

Link to website:

http://naturecanada.ca/2015-photo-contest/

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDWe wish you all good luck and look forward to viewing all the 2015 winning entries. 

2nd Annual Float for Life Event

COUSTEAUThe day includes a float and a talk by Alexandra Cousteau, the granddaughter of Jacques-Yves Cousteau, the conservationist, filmmaker, photographer, and author who studied the sea. She will talk about her love of the oceans and growing up with her grandfather as her guide. Her father, Philippe, who co-produced numerous projects with Jacques, died when she was 3.
“Our oceans are in trouble,” Cousteau said. “Float for Life gives people an opportunity to reconnect with the ocean be reminded that we all have an important role to play in ocean conservation. After all, people protect what they love.”
SANIBELThe float promotes the environmental, economic, psychological and physical benefits of water as part of a fundraiser for the Sanibel Sea School. The school is a nonprofit focused on marine-based preservation and offers day camps, outings, and adult classes centered on wildlife and habitats in Sanibel.

“One of our favorite things to do with our campers is a soul float,” said Director of Operations Leah Biery.
A soul float is similar to a Float for Life. While being supported by life jackets or laying back on paddle and surf boards, the children float along the beach.
“We feel the water around us, catch the current,” she said. “They are feeling and connecting with the ocean and enjoying it.” And it’s done with the same goal as Float for Life.

Image result for float for lifeThe school is “in hopes that falling in love with the ocean will make them want to protect it,” Biery said.
In the inaugural Float year, 60 people participated, and Lynch is hoping for far more this year.
Participants will form groups of three; as one person floats, the others will support them gently for about 10 minutes. Then they will rotate.
“We believe the positive floating connection to the water will inspire individual calls to action to protect our oceans,” Lynch said. “It is pretty amazing how restorative it is. Some people feel like it’s an hour, others feel like it’s 2 minutes.”
She explained that the Gulf water is roughly the same salt content as human blood, creating a connective bond.
“When somebody is floating, they naturally feel at home because of the lightness,” she said. “When you lay in the water, you feel the quiet. The water is calming to your nervous system, and, along with the likeness of the salt content, the body lets go naturally. Muscles start to let go.”

By enforcing the body/nature connection, she said it leads to action, whether it’s “picking up plastic bags or straws on the beach or voting your conscience at the polls.”
Participants will receive an eco-friendly water bottle and samples of Earth-friendly sun screen.
Biery said the school is enjoying the partnership with Float for Life.
“We’re always amazed about how well the communities of Sanibel and Fort Myers come out to support us,” she said.
COUSTEAU2CROPAlexandra Cousteau
The granddaughter of Jacques-Yves Cousteau, known for his ABC show “The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau” from 1966-76, will speak about her famous family and her conservation work at the second annual Float for Life at Pink Shell in Fort Myers Beach.
Image result for float for life“After our first year, we wanted someone to draw more people and bring awareness to ocean conservation,” said Float for Life founder Shelley Lynch, a mental health therapist from Orlando.
Image result for alexandra cousteau blue legacyAlexandra Cousteau founded Blue Legacy, a non-profit organization to empower people to reclaim and restore the world’s water, one community at a time.
She has co-hosted “Blue August” on the Discovery Channel and was chief correspondent on water issues for Dicovery’s “Planet Green.”
She lives in Washington, D.C., and Berlin.

Connect with this reporter on Twitter @stacey_henson