Category Archives: Beautiful Lakes

Ottawa Dragon Boat Festival ~ Paddles Up Everyone

PADDLES UP FOR THE 2015 TIM HORTONS’ 

OTTAWA DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL

TIM HORTONS OTTAWA DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES                                  FREE CONCERT LINEUP 2015

HEADLINERS INCLUDE TOKYO POLICE CLUB, HEY ROSETTA!, DAN MANGAN + BLACKSMITH, THE RURAL ALBERTA ADVANTAGE, YUKON BLONDE AND MORE – JUNE 25 TO 28

Now in it’s 22nd year, Tim Horton’s Ottawa Dragon Boat is proud to announce their 2015 lineup. The festival, taking place at Mooney’s Bay Park in downtown Ottawa from June 25th-28th, will include performances from Canadian heavyweights Hey Rosetta!, Dan Mangan + Blacksmith, The Rural Alberta Advantage, Tokyo Police Club, Yukon Blonde and many more.

The Tim Hortons Ottawa Dragon Boat Festival is the largest festival of its kind in North America. It is a three day event held at Mooney’s Bay Park.

Admission is FREE and features non-stop racing, concerts, children’s area, cultural performances, local delicacies, artisans and fun shopping! It is a great destination in the heart of the Nations Capital and is an easy getaway for visitors from Ontario, Quebec and the United States.

THE 22nd ANNUAL OTTAWA DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL WILL TAKE PLACE ON JUNE 25-28, 2015

In partnership with the Ottawa Dragon Boat Foundation, paddlers raise funds through the Pledge Challenge for local charities. To join the Pledge Challenge, visit http://www.dragonboatfoundation.net.

The following is a YouTube video of the 2011 Ottawa Dragon Boat Festival –

I just had to include the following inspirational video I found on YouTube, “Must Watch Dragon Boat Clip!!!”, taken from various dragon boat events in Singapore.

This video was created to show that the sport, dragon boating, is not just about training hard to win, but to enjoy and embrace all the elements that it encompasses.

Three fun filled days for everyone –

Have a great time –

Best of luck to all participants

“WINNING PADDLES TAKE ALL!!!”

           MUSIC BULLLET 2 “…dip, dip and swing your paddles, 
                         splashing with silver,
                         follow the wild goose flight
                         dip, dip and swing…”

Rainsoft – Eternally Pure Water Systems, Inc.

SALES & SERVICE for all your water treatment needs in Ottawa and surrounding areas in Ontario and Quebec.

 

 

 

 

Lake Vanishes Every Summer ~ Awesome!

1-LOST LAKEAll The Water In This Lake Vanishes Down a Hole Every Summer May 6, 2015 | by Janet Fang of IFLSCIENCE

photo credit: A screenshot of the lava tube draining Lost Lake from a youtube video by Ryan Brennecke for The Bulletin

In the mountains of Oregon, there’s a shallow lake just off the highway that disappears once a year during the dry summer months, then reappears during the wetter seasons. It’s called Lost Lake, and its magical vanishing act is thanks to a lava tube.

These geographic features form when streaming lava cools and hardens at the top while the hot insides beneath the surface continue to flow downhill. The tunnel that’s left behind may open up a hole after an eruption or through erosion. Lava tubes ranging from trash-can-sized little guys to subway-tunnel-sized ones you can walk through are scattered across the volcanic terrain of Central Oregon and the Cascade Range.

Several small streams flow into the 0.34-square-kilometer (0.13-square-mile) Lost Lake, and they all drain into one (possibly two) of these large holes on the north side of the lake. Water starts pouring in during the late fall, and it continues throughout the rain and snowstorms. “It fills up in the winter, when input exceeds the rate of draining, and then it goes dry and it’s a meadow,” Willamette National Forest spokeswoman Jude McHugh tells The Bulletin of Bend, Oregon. The hole has been there as long as anyone can remember.

Here’s a very cool video from The Bulletin of Lost Lake funneling down the lava tube drain hole, the lake’s only known outlet:

Published on Apr 23, 2015 – Water from Lost Lake drains down one of the many lava tubes scattered throughout the Central Oregon Cascades. The water is most likely seeping into the subsurface below and refilling the massive aquifer that feeds springs on both sides of the Cascades. The story: j.mp/1aXYVBU.

Lost Lake probably formed about 3,000 years ago, when lava flowing from a volcanic vent blocked a river channel to create a lake, McHugh tells Live Science. It sits atop 12,000-year-old volcanic rock that was filled with bubbles back when it was forming. When the gas escaped into the atmosphere, it left behind pores alongside various cracks and fissures throughout landscape.

We don’t know if the water flowing into the hole travels to an outlet, though McHugh thinks that it likely seeps into the porous subsurface below—recharging the aquifer that feeds the springs on either side of the Cascades. It can take a decade for the water to filter down through all those holes and cracks.

“Here in western Oregon, it pops out at the valley floor and supplies drinking water and important habitat for humans, fish and all kinds of species,” she adds. “That water that fell today, there’s some kid that’s going to be born tomorrow that’s going to be drinking it when he’s 10.” [Via Live Science, The Bulletin]

Canada in need of a national water policy?

1-BLOG WATER ACT

The following article, “Should Canada have a National Water Policy, by Stephen Braun, appeared in the July/Aug 2014 issue of watercanada.

Despite the best efforts of many people who care so much about our national water resources, Canada has no national water policy or strategy. 

hydrologic_cycle

Canada’s creeks, rivers, lakes, and groundwater are governed by a patchwork of laws and regulations, though they cross provincial or territorial boundaries without restriction.
One thing is certain: coming up with a better definition of a national water policy is not going to make it spontaneously materialize. We have defined this issue well and have a good point of reference. What is required now is political will and recognition that such a policy is essential to Canada’s self-interest – and nothing less.
CWRAFor example, the Canadian Water Resources Association took the issue on in 2008 with the release of Toward a Canadian National Water Strategy, authored by well-Rob-de-Loeknown water policy expert Rob de Loe. Yet implementation remains elusive on this subject despite this and other high profile efforts.
More recently, Ralph Pentland and Chris Wood’s 2013 down the drainbook, Down the Drain: How We are Failing to Protect Our Water Resources, explained the unimplemented but ambitious 1987 Federal Water Policy,and that little progress has been seen since federally. Their arguments and facts that our water resources are an issue of national importance and cannot be left to the provinces are compelling. Pentland and Wood stated: “Legislation currently in force and Confederation’s founding documents empower Canada’s federal Crown to take robust action to defend water, waterways, and the life that inhabits them.”
Canada’s past approach to the contrary, the federal government absolutely does have the power to ensure our national water resources are kept healthy and sound. Canada
Canadians might believe this country is advanced in its environmental policy, but we are lagging behind other Image result for environmental protection agency (epa)jurisdictions. Even Republican U.S. President Richard Nixon recognized the importance of a national water policy. He founded
the  Environmental Protection Agency  (EPA), which subsequently led to the Clean Water and Safe DrinkingSAFE WATER ACT Water acts.  Nixon facilitated some pretty ambitious national water protection in a country not known for its love of federal regulation.
Canada’s more recent approach Of discontinuing environmental round-tables, restricting scientists from speaking publicly, and shuttering cottages on certain lakes might seem like the time isn’t ripe for a national water policy. Perhaps the time will never be right exactly, but as water professionals we must continue to advocate for it.

DESMOND TUTUDesmond Tutu visited some of Canada’s northern watersheds this spring. His famous quote, “I am not an optimist, I am a prisoner of hope,” seemed to capture the mood up there. But he said something else.
ch7_11If we apply this insight to a national water policy, it can be seen that the pillars of the bridge are largely in place. They are there as the result of excellent past work of many in this country and within other parts of the world. The reasonableness is in those pillars; it is up to us to build the rest of the bridge—hopefully with more magnanimity than realpolitik—but it must get built. 

 STEPHEN BRAUNStephen Braun is a principal
and water resources engineer
with GeoProcess Research
Associates.

RAINGRID LOGOHe is a founding
partner of RainGrid Inc.

CWRAand is currently the Ontario branch president of
the 
Canadian Water Resources Association.

Related link

http://www.canadians.org/waterpolicy-info 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=er3pJzAmouw

Adaptation Strategies Needed for The Great Lakes

FIRST IMAGE

The following article, “The Great Lakes Need Adaptation Experiments”, by Gail Krantzberg and Sommer Abdel-Fattah, appeared in watercanada’s July/August publication.

3RD PARATo mitigate the negative impacts of climate change on the Great
Lakes basin ecosystem, it is essential to plan for and adapt current programs and policies. Adaptive strategies need to be specific enough to address the driver of degradation. In the Great Lakes, temperature increases will be particularly important in shallow areas, so adaptation strategies are needed to protect, for example, wetland habitats and biodiversity.

WATER DROPLET1_FOR BLOG ICONI found an excellent youtube video, ” Municipal Adaptation and Resiliency Service”, posted Jan. 16, 2014, that will clarify and /or add to many points in this article. (The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative is launching a Municipal Adaptation and Resiliency Service (MARS) for its member municipalities, to help them accelerate and expand their adaptation activities, to be ready for the next storm.  Visit glslcities.org/mars.cfm for more information.)

2ND LAST PARAWith more intense precipitation events, adaptation strategies that address non-point source pollution are prudent. Precautionary actions should include measures to reduce soil erosion, address land and water quality degradation, anticipate infrastructure to avoid flooding, and avert infrastructure failure. RIPARIAN BUFFER3Measures include the creation of riparian buffer strips, the manipulation of stormwater pathways, the increase of permeable surfaces, and erosion control on steep slopes. Further, attention should be paid to infrastructural changes to ensure the integrity of harbours, marinas, and piers as well as improvement of navigational aids and hydrographic charting. 

CLIMATE CHANGE MONITORWhile recent efforts have focused on the capacity of practitioners to understand how the changing climate impacts water quality and quantity, there are limited examples of adaptation being implemented. Challenges that explain why implementation is limited include:
1 A lack of funding to test and implement innovative technologies;
2 A lack of institutional capacity for adaptation planning and implementation;
3 Cuts to federal science in support of technical modelling of climate projections to reduce uncertaintyin results;
4 Complexities of multi-sector coordination;
5 Fragmentation across agencies;
6 A lack of social and community involvement, with trends to an increasing lack of public concern or confidence in climate science;
7 A lack of adaptation policy and enforced policy; and
8 Few examples of adaptive studies that have demonstrated effective solutions.
At present, most Great Lakes states and provinces have adopted climate action plans that provide greenhouse-gas emission inventory data and make emission reduction recommendations. While there is a general emphasis on the environmental risks and the value of reducing emissions, much less attention has been given to adaptation. Where plans do exist, most of the focus has been placed on responses to changes in water availability and demand, and how to manage increases in demand for water, much less so to water quality and ecosystem integrity.

PARA2BUFFER

On the positive side, the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative launched the Municipal Adaptation and Resiliency Service (MARS) in January 2014 to help municipalities accelerate and expand their adaptation activities. This initiative will provide a portal for municipal members to access climate and adaptation information and resources that will also serve as an interactive forum for information sharing.
EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGEThe push for adaptation interventions comes from understanding the ramifications of climate-related changes to plausible ecosystem impacts through preventative action. Adaptation efforts must include capacity building, policy innovation, natural resource management actions, and engaging the Great Lakes community in the implementation and evaluation of those efforts. 
GAIL

 Gail Krantzberg is the director of the Centre
for Engineering and Public Policy at McMaster
University.

SOMMER TO CROP

Sommer Abdel-Fattah is an NSERC
post-doctoral government fellow and lecturer
in the bachelor of engineering and technology
program at McMaster University.

 

Strange Lakes and Rivers Around The World ~ AWESOME!

1-BEAUTIFUL LAKES1

These 15 Strange Lakes And Rivers From Around The World Are Shockingly Pretty. If you travel around the world, you’ll find rivers and lakes with colors once thought to only be in dreams. From pink rivers to red lakes, these bodies of water gained their color through a variety of means. Some are colored differently because of pollution. Some just naturally have a distinct color. Either way, you truly have to see these bodies of water for yourself.   

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDAs I view the following remarkable photos of these lakes and rivers, I am in awe of nature’s bountiful display – the colours in her palette are absolutely  dazzling and yes “thought to only be in dreams” – truly a power to evoke awe and wonder!

Perhaps you might enjoy watching my video that I uploaded to Youtube on Sep 11, 2012.  Sit back, relax and enjoy this video of incredible photography of the most amazingly beautiful lakes from around the world. Enjoy the accompanying music, “Life Streams” by Mark Mueller and Scott Nelson. I created this video for Rainsoft Ottawa’s WordPress blog, “Incredible Lakes From Around the World”. I would greatly appreciate your feedback.

1.) Betsiboka River, Madagascar

2.) The Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

3.) Travertine Pools, Pamukkale, Turkey

 4.) Huanghe River, Lanzhou, China

5.) Uvac River flowing through Serbia, Bosnia, and Herzegovina

HAPPY 147th BIRTHDAY/JOYEAUX ANNIVERSAIRE CANADA!!!

CANADA DAY

What a fantastic and uplifting way to start off your Canada Day Celebrations!!!

“Pharrell Williams – Happy (Canadian Olympic and Paralympic version” Fabulous new video published Jun 23, 2014 just in time for Canada’s 147th birthday celebration featuring my favorite song of all time! Canada’s Olympic and Paralympic teams dance to Pharrell Williams – ‘Happy’ featuring, (in no order) / Danse des équipes olympique et paralympique sur la chanson « Happy » de Pharrell Williams mettant en vedette (pas en ordre d’apparition)

Many thanks to Dominique Ritter of Best Health magazine, July 2014 for her slide show, “25 Reasons to love Canada”, by edition is an impressive insight to all Canadians from coast to coast:

WE TAKE A STAND – From Greenpeace’s campaigns against GMOs and climate change to Vice’s front-line reporting to Adbusters’ Occupy Wall Street movement, we have a vital tradition of protest—and a richer democracy as a result. WE’RE DOGS’ BEST FRIENDS – Inspired by a group in the U.S., Vancouver dog trainer Gini Green recently launched Pilots N Paws Canada, a program to help relocate pooches in overcrowded shelters to less doggy-dense areas, where they have a better chance of finding a forever home.

OUR DREAMS CAN COME TRUE – Shawn Van Daele, who lives near Guelph, Ont., is teaching sick kids that anything is possible: he makes them the stars of their own storybooks using digital illustration of original photography.  

WE DEFINE SPORTSMANLIKE CONDUCT – At the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi,Canadian cross-country skiing coach Justin Wadsworth—and his spare ski—came to the rescue of Russian Anton Gafarov after the athlete wiped out and busted his equipment. 

NO ONE DOES WINTER BETTER – Sure, we know how to embrace cold weather—tobogganing, hangboarding and snowshoeing were all invented here—but we also know how to fight it: with underground cities, connected office towers, indoor water parks and snow blowers. OUR SWEET TEMPTATIONS – Quebec is the world’s largest producer of maple syrup, the stuff great ice cream, marinades and pancake breakfasts are made of. In 2012, the amber liquid was the target of an $18-million heist, the stuff Hollywood movies are made of. The upcoming film will star Jason Segel.

WE’RE SHARING THE CATCH – Thanks to Nanaimo, B.C., resident Jon Pimlott, wheelchair-accessible fishing is no longer restricted to dry land. He’s found simple, inexpensive ways to adapt small craft—canoes and rowboats—for people with disabilities. WE’RE TECHNOLOGICALLY ADORABLE – Brooks Way didn’t realize he’d lost his phone until his friend’s sister pointed out the video that had been posted to his Instagram account. A group of Waterloo, Ont., kids found the phone and decided to make a cute video message—”We found your phone”—interspersed with clips of them skateboarding.

OUR SPACEMAN – It’s possible we love Chris Hadfield even more now that he’s back among us Earthlings, touring schools, skyping with students and tweeting answers to questions about spacesuits. 

  WE’RE CARING FOR KIDS – With the support of UNICEF, University of British Columbia professor Judy McLean’s program to provide essential nutrition to children in Rwanda was recently expanded to include 250,000 toddlers. “My goal is to reach all the kids in this age range,” said McLean.

WE’RE ENTERTAINERS – In 1984, a troupe of Québécois street performers, led by Guy Laliberté, founded Cirque du Soleil. Last year, close to 15 million people worldwide saw a Cirque show, and the province’s penchant for acrobatics has expanded to include Cirque Éloize, Les 7 doigts de la main and two specialty schools, making Montreal circus central.

OUR COMIC OVERLORDS – Some people think Canadians aren’t funny, but that’s only because we’ve been so nice about our total domination of humour! If we may issue a polite reminder of our stars: Leslie Nielsen, Stephen Leacock (Groucho Marx was a fan), Seth Rogen, SCTV, Jay Baruchel, Catherine O’Hara, Eugene Levy, the Kids in the Hall, Jonathan Goldstein, Lorne Michaels, Russell Peters, Martin Short and Samantha Bee, not to mention Drake and his hilarious undercover streeters.

OUR ON-SCREEN SWEETHEARTS – Two of Hollywood’s current crushes hail from here: Regina’s Tatiana Maslany, who masterfully portrays a handful of clones like it ain’t no thing in the sci-fi hit TV show Orphan Black, and Halifax’s Ellen Page, whose moving coming-out speech showed us she doesn’t just kick butt as Kitty Pryde in X-Men.

WE’RE UNRAVELLING THE MYSTERIES OF THE HUMAN HEART – Last year, the Nobel committee awarded its literature prize to Alice Munro, declaring that her short-story writing has “come close to solving the greatest mystery of them all: the human heart and its caprices.”

WE’RE THERE FOR EACH OTHER – Vancouver artist Jeff Hamada is out to boost spirits. In February, he offered to send a postcard with an encouraging note penned by a stranger to anyone who commented on his blog, Booooooom.com. They just had to provide their mailing addresses and descriptions of their woes. 

WE KNOW SO MANY THINGS! – What game was invented by two Montrealers after they bemoaned the cost of replacing Scrabble sets because of lost tiles? Trivial Pursuit! The most successful board game in Canadian history is 35 years old and still taxing our ephemeral knowledge with apps, new card decks, party versions and special editions (including Disney and Lord of the Rings). 

WE GOT GAME  -Not only did we give the world basketball (thank you, James Naismith), but we also gave the world NBA super­star Steve Nash, as well as Brampton, Ont., a hotbed of top league talent like Anthony Bennett and Tristan Thompson. And how about those Raptors? A for effort. EVEN OUR PETS ROOT FOR THE HOME TEAM – How many countries can say that about their four-legged friends?

 

OUR NATIONAL BROADCASTER – Sure, it has slashed staff and lost hockey broadcasting rights, but CBC still means Anna Maria Tremonti, Peter Mansbridge, Rick Mercer, Shaun Majumder, Eleanor Wachtel, Stuart McLean… 

WE PLAY IT AGAIN (AND AGAIN) – “Hockey Night in Canada” was the first broadcast to use instant replay back in 1955, when producer George Retzlaff employed a new process to recreate footage of a goal. We’ve been watching live events over and over ever since, with Major League Baseball the latest to adopt the technology for all game play in 2014.

WE PAY IT FORWARD – Last July, a man walked into a Tim Hortons in Edmonton and bought coffee for the next 500 customers.
Days later, other people did the same in Calgary, Ottawa and Red Deer, Alta.

 

WE’RE SAVING THE WORLD FROM SUPERVILLAINY – Created by Toronto artist Jeff Lemire, Equinox—a 16-year-old Cree girl from Moose Factory, Ont.—is the newest addition to DC Comics’ roster of superheroes. 

 

IT’S ALL IN THE FAMILY – Our awesome athletes come in genetic bundles: the Dufour-Lapointe sisters (freestyle skiing), the Hamelin brothers (speedskating) and the Subbans (hockey). 

 
WE’RE FULL OF HOT AIR – Canada is poised to lead the world in a new era of transportation that looks a lot like an old era of transportation. Airships—dirigibles that require little fuel and no runway, and can carry weighty cargo—are the perfect way to access hard-to-reach areas such as disaster zones. 

WE’RE CHANGING THE WORLD – With We Day, Marc and Craig Kielburger have turned global charitable works into headline pep rallies featuring inspiring speakers (Al Gore, Jane Goodall) and top musical acts (K’naan, Demi Lovato), giving teens a reason to get excited about forging a better future.  

VICTORIA DAYFIRE5HAPPY CANADA DAY!!!

From your friends at

Rainsoft Eternally Pure Water Systems, Inc.

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada        

 

“We have a lot of great things going for us in the Great White North. Here are 25 reasons to feel proud of the Maple Leaf” http://www.besthealthmag.ca/embrace-life/home-and-family/25-reasons-to-love-canada      

Canada’s nutrient problem ~ severely threatened Lake Winnipeg

1-LAKE WINNIPEG

The following article “OVERLOADED ~ Deammonification processing can address Canada’s nutrient problem, especially in a severely threatened Lake Winnipeg’  by Simon Baker and Beverley Stinson appeared in the Mar/Apr issue of WaterCanada

BASIN INITIATIVEIn 2013, Lake Winnipeg was named the world’s “threatened lake of the Year” because of increasing pollution from agricultural run-off and sewage discharges. Excessive nutrients – particularly nitrogen and phosphorus – in Canada’s lakes and riversGREAT LAKES INITIATIVE are becoming a growing public concern. In response, environment Canada has launched two major government programs worth millions of dollars: the Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund and the Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative.

Lake Winnipeg named worlds most threatened | CTV News.
Research has focused on the specific role of municipal wastewater treatment in contributing to the problem. Analyzing more than 116,000 tonnes of nutrients released from public and private industrial facilities, a study by the federal government’s national pollutant release inventory reported that 85 per cent originated from municipal water and sewage systems.
n and d cycle Municipal wastewater treatment can include nitrogen removal processing to help the level of total nitrogen in effluent prior to its discharge. One of the most common methods is nitrification/denitrification. It is a two-step process that involves first converting the wastewater’s ammonia content into nitrates so that it can then be converted into nitrogen gas, a harmless byproduct.

IMAGE5  A typical wastewater treatment plant can reduce total nitrogen levels in effluent down to 5 mg/l in the winter and less than 1 mg/l in the summer using nitrification/denitrification processing, CCMEAccording to the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment. This approach is not, however, without its disadvantages. It involves significant power consumption and, in some cases, the use of costly and hazardous chemicals, predominantly methanol.
   Nitrification/denitrification processing is the conventional option, but if growing public concern over water quality issues leads to new or more stringent nutrient removal requirements for wastewater treatment processing, the associated rise in operating costs will likely be significant.
DEAMONIFICATION  A growing awareness of this problem within North America’s municipal water sector is leading some to consider an emerging solution – to help reduce both the energyANAMOX and chemical costs of conventional processing. Deammonification is based on the innovative development of a newmethod using the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) microbial process.
This microbial process involves a previously unknown bacterium, first Discovered in 1995 by scientists at Delft Technical DELFT UNIVERSITYUniversity in the Netherlands. The bacterium’s unique characteristics provide a completely different metabolic pathway. Nitrogen can be processed under anaerobic conditions, rather than aerobic conditions, thereby reducing energy and chemical costs.
The greatest opportunity to reduce energy and chemical costs with deammonification lies in adapting the technology to mainstream treatment configurations. Achieving this goal is the focus of an AIZinternational collaborative research effort. The team is led by water agencies in Austria (Achental- Inntal Zillerta Waterboard) and the United States (District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority and the Hampton Roads Sanitation District, Virginia) and supported by ARa Consult GmbH and AECOM.
WASHINGTON DC Extensive bench and pilot scale work was undertaken at the Blue Plains wastewater treatment plant in Washington, D.C., and smaller facilities in Virginia to explore viable control strategies for mainstream deammonification with great success.
The existing nitrification/denitrification configuration at Blue Plains was identified as the plant’s largest energy-consuming process, accounting for 27 per-cent of the total electrical demand. The chemical cost of the methanol required for the processing totals between US$9 million and US$10 million per year. The results from a pilot study and demonstration phase using a mainstream deammonification configuration indicated Blue Plains could obtain a theoretical 65 per cent savings in energy and a 90 per cent savings in chemicals while meeting stringent effluent discharge requirements for nitrogen.
STRASS CENTRE  Based on those findings, the team launched a project at the Strass wastewater treatment plant, near Innsbruck, Austria, in 2011, which successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a mainstream deammonification configuration. The plant was able to remove more nitrogen and maintain more stable performance while operating under deammonification than it had achieved while operating in the conventional method during the previous winter.
While the work in Austria and the United States is helping develop deammonification into a proven solution for mainstream treatment configurations, the first, albeit smaller, steps in Canada are taking place in terms of the technology’s application to sidestream treatment.
NORTH WPG SYSTEM      Last year, the City of Winnipeg retained AECOM to prepare an optimization Study for the centrate treatment plant at its North End Water Pollution Control Centre, Winnipeg’s largest wastewater Treatment plant. The study looked at a review of alternative configurations, including sidestream deammonification, to explore options for reducing the energy and chemical costs related to nutrient removal.
CONVERT INTO NITRATES Using the plant’s current nitrification/denitrification configuration as a performance measure, the study suggested deammonification could provide a significant savings in power consumption and methanol, representing an 83 per cent reduction in operating costs when compared to the reference case. Deammonification’s results in lowering these operating costs were also significantly better than those achieved through the other conventional alternatives examined, which ranged from four to 42 per cent.
  LAKE ERIECanada has a strong track record in responding to concerns over water quality issues. After being declared “dead” in the 1960s, Ontario’s Lake Erie became an environmental recovery success story once wastewater treatment plants began to treat effluent by removing phosphorus loads. It is a valuable lesson to remember, but one that comes with an important distinction.
WATER AND SEWAGE SYSTEMSIf today’s municipal plants were similarly required to improve their treatment capabilities, they would be doing so in a far different operating environment than their counterparts of more than 50 years ago. Any upgrade investment would need to anticipate the continuing steep rise in associated energy and chemical costs.
The potential of deammonification lies in its value of offering a solution to the environmental challenge of reducing nutrient loads, but at the same time allowing operators to manage the inescapable economic realities involved in this challenge.
Simon Baker is a Winnipeg-based, aecom wastewater expert. Beverley Stinson is aecom’s technical lead for biological nutrient removal and director of applied research.