Category Archives: Architecture

Only in Paris ~ Incredible Bridge Competition

SEULEMENT DANS PARIS ~ INCROYABLE!!!

 

This is a follow up to my  October 26, 2012 blog, “Seulement Dans Paris ~ Incroyalbe!!!” to let you know who won the design competition “A Bridge in Paris”. In that blog I featured AtelierZundel Cristea’s incredibly creative entry – an inflatable trampoline bridge (see link to Oct. 2012 blog below photo). The trampoline entry was awarded 3rd prize.

…In Paris, an inflatable trampoline bridge has been proposed by the Paris-based architectural studio Atelier Zündel Cristea firm to span the Seine River.  This would allow travellers a unique and fun method of crossing the Seine River near the existing Pont de Bir-Hakeim

https://rainsoftottawa.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=8583&action=edit

The winner of the competition was “Quivering wire crossing” by “bureau faceB wins Paris bridge competition” article posted 24 October 2012 on dezeen magazine’s site

Water At-traction by bureau faceB

News: French practice bureau faceB has won a competition to design a bridge across the Seine in Paris with plans for a wobbling crossing of stretched steel cables.

Water At-traction by bureau faceB

Concrete treads would be threaded over the cables, creating a surface that will quiver under the pressure of footsteps.

PARIS BRIDGE“In Paris, people don’t feel the water,” architect Camille Mourier told Dezeen. “We wanted people to feel that they are crossing.”

Water At-traction by bureau faceB

Each cable would be strung onto springs to prevent too much movement.

Water At-traction by bureau faceB

 

On the southern side of the island, part of the bridge would be pulled down towards the water to create a stepped area where Mourier hopes people will be able to “sit down and have a sandwich”.

Water At-traction by bureau faceB

Only a narrow pathway would be left to run alongside these steps, which the architects compare to a perilous Himalayan footbridge.

Here’s a project description from bureau faceB:


Water “At-traction”
A pedestrian bridge to stroll along the water

It’s in the heart of the city. One of its major attractions. However, you can barely feel it. Maybe on a boat, a little bit on bridges, anyway without intimacy. On the contrary La Seine has to be seen as an out of time place, telling you stories and history. A link through time and space: the water attraction.

This new bridge has to be seen as a light stroke, a thin roadway flirting with the water. Instead of using traditional technics based on compression, it uses a new design, using the potential of traction. Steel cables, strung between the banks by springs, generate a mesh on which concrete beads are threaded.

This fluent area enables new uses. The crossing can be done in two ways. Through a “perilous” one: the very narrow deck gives the feeling of an Himalayan footbridge. Through a space for strolling: the generous space near the water allows to sit, to rest quietly, having lunch, enjoying the proximity of the river and offering a unique perspective on Paris.

Project team: Camille Mourier, François Marcuz, Arnaud Malras, Germain Pluvinage

The following bridge entry by an American architectural student in the United States won 2nd prize ~

ABMV:
August Miller + Bernard Vilza + +
Architecture Student+ United States

ArchTriumph

 

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A Photo Journey through Atlantis, Bahamas ~ Fabulous!

ATLANTIS PARADISE ISLANDThe following is a reblog of Leslie Carter’s (my all time #1 favorite blogger!) from her Bucket list publications.  (http://bucketlistpublications.org)- posted Jan.27, 2014
Thank you, Leslie  for this wonderful and magical armchair travel journey.

A Photo Journey through Atlantis, Bahamas.

Royal Tower, Atlantis, Bahamas

Trying to explain everything that Atlantis, Paradise Island has to offer in one post would be impossible. Surprises and unique adventures were around every corner. From water slides, marine habitats, adventure currents, nightly entertainment, spas, sports, and a casino, it was important to pick favorites and cover those activities first because the endless adventures would provide a lifetime of entertainment. Follow our Atlantis journey through a series of my favorite photos.

Celebrity Transfers picked us up at the airport and drove us to The Reef, Atlantis in style.

Celebrity Transfers, Atlantis, Bahamas

The Reef provided us with all the comforts of home including a kitchen, garden tub, amazing ocean views, a semi-private pool, and easy access to the white-sand beaches.

The Reef, Atlantis

The Reef, Atlantis

Our View from The Reef, Atlantis Bahamas

Aquaventure, Atlantis Paradise Island’s water park, is a 141-acre waterscape with non-stop aquatic thrill ride features over twenty million gallons of water, thrilling high-speed water slides, a mile-long river ride with rolling rapids and wave surges, 20 swimming areas, a spectacular kids water-play fort, and 11 unique and refreshing swimming pools. We rode The Current and somehow managed to stay in the tube even when everyone around us was falling out.

Aquaventure, Atlantis Paradise Island

The Current, Atlantis

Aquaventure, Atlantis Paradise Island

The Marine Habitat offers a unique opportunity to explore lagoons, caves, coral formations, and underwater ruins designed to showcase exotic marine life ranging from dolphins and sea lions to sharks, rays, barracuda, to piranha, and eels. Athena loved the sharks the most; amazed by their graceful movements.

Atlantis, The Dig

The Dig, Atlantis

Playing with sea lions and dolphins was a first for my sister, Gabriella. The smile never left her face during the entire time we were in the extraordinary, almost dreamlike, environment.

Funny Sea Lion, Atlantis, Bahamas

Swimming with Dolphins at Atlantis, Bahamas

Every beach at Atlantis has its own unique allure and charm. Mom relaxed during her morning stroll on Atlantis Beach where she rubbed her feet in the fine powder-sand and we all splashed in the waves of The Cove Beach while looking at the spectactular vista of azure water.  Beaches, Atlantis Bahamas

Beaches, Atlantis Bahamas

Visiting Atlantis included adventure, relaxation, family-fun, and side splitting entertainment with Sherri Shepherd. It also included over-coming one of my greatest fears – swimming with sharks through Sea Trek.

Sea Trek Walk with Sharks

Sea Trek Walk with Sharks

The options at Atlantis are endless. When you book your vacation, start thinking about what you’d like to do the most immediately because you’re in for a non-stop, dream-like experience.

Designing water reclaiming and recycling programs – green technology

ROOFTOP GARDEN

This article, ‘Function and Beauty – A new reality for watershapes’, by Aviram Müller, appeared in the Jan/Feb issue of WaterCanada magazine.

Please note that I’ve added a YouTube video, uploaded Sept. 15, 2010 by Aviram Muller, regarding the BioReSys – Bionic Regeneration Systems which I definitely recommend – should be a must for our current school curriculum.  This video is the first of five parts which you can access after watching Part 1.

In recent centuries , designers have done a tremendous job of figuring out how water looks and sounds. As environmental concerns become increasingly important, however, we’re being challenged to think differently about water – how it affects us physically and the essential role it plays in maintaining a healthy world.
2ND PARAAs a species, we’ve done a great deal to squander water as an asset, whether by contaminating and otherwise polluting natural bodies of water or by treating pools and other watershapes with harsh chemicals. Isn’t it ironic that spas, which exist primarily so we can take advantage of their healthful benefits, are commonly sanitized with chlorine or other powerful oxidizers that may be hazardous to our health?
3RD PARAIn trying to use water to achieve healthful or recreational ends, we have in fact turned away from its natural value and benefits. And it’s not just spas or swimming pools—even with decorative, purely visual water features such as fountains, we have for years turned our backs on natural processes while
pursuing our aesthetic goals.
Point of crisis
Today’s culmination of economic and environmental crises presents an amazing opportunity for watershapers to step back and set the foundations for a fresh, sustainable direction.
5TH PARAWhen water features emerged in Classical times, Islamic and later European societies, they introduced fountains as the public source for potable water. It was only after centuries of performing this public function that fountains moved decisively away from their original purpose and became more or less purely decorative.

6TH PARAThe time has come for water feature to come full circle. Not only must water features be beautiful and soothing, but henceforth, they must be functional, purposeful in the reclamation and decontamination of water. And if water features as part of water management also remediate existing environmental damage or contribute to the cooling of interior spaces, even better.
Increased scope
7TH PARAIn recent years, the typical water feature (fountain, pool, spa, pond or stream) has essentially been a standalone unit in which water is circulated, filtered and treated in a closed loop. As such, these features have very little (if anything at all) to do with the overall performance of adjacent buildings or spaces.
8TH PARABut water features could be part of a much larger system. Water could be reclaimed from roofs and other impermeable surfaces, moved into storage in various cisterns or reservoirs and then treated biologically in planted pond or wetland areas or used as part of a water feature. Then, this same water can be used for irrigation, firefighting, air conditioning or the cooling of manufacturing, industrial and power-generating systems.
Some of the pioneering work has already been done. What may seem revolutionary to some in North America is, in fact, already widely practiced in Europe and has been part of the designer approach for more than 20 years. In some places, natural resources and environments are so restricted by population density that designers have already moved in this direction out of necessity.
For years, they’ve dealt with acid rain, groundwater contamination and rivers so polluted that swimming in them has become hazardous or impossible. Under those constraints, system designers think differently about how they manage, reclaim and reuse water.
Using biology
In North America, we have been taught that water can only be effectively treated through use of chemicals and mechanical filtration. But in Europe, the effluent from car washes, water discharged from nuclear power plants, cooling water from large office buildings, and even the water that emerges from zoological exhibits are treated biologically. In addition, the European experience has shown that biological filtration using specific types of plants can help remediate contaminated water by removing heavy metals and organic compounds introduced into water supplies via the fertilizers used by agricultural or industrial operations.
Whether they take the form of ponds with wetland areas and planted floating islands or of green roofs that bring park like features to urban settings, biological systems can be beautiful. Once humdrum settings, such as retention basins, are now accented with plants, pathways, docks, floating fountains, floating islands and diverse varieties of wildlife.
Specific measures
PARA 14Currently, there are no classifications or criteria in the LEED certification program referring specifically to water feature designs. The Water Efficiency category, however, emphasizes reducing the use of potable water supplies and thus presents several opportunities for creative applications.
PARA 15Already, according to current LEED provisions, a green roof can be used to capture rainwater. Once captured, the water is treatment by flowing either to a gravel-based wetlands zone/retention basin or into a body of water that contains floating islands and myriad plants that take up contaminants.
PARA 16When water exits these basins, no matter its condition, it can be used for water features, irrigation, or numerous other reasons. Alternatively, this water can be channeled into an “infiltration” basin where water is injected into the ground to help recharge aquifers. This can be helpful in areas where there are issues with seawater intrusion or underground plumes of pollution.
PARA 17Some LEED projects seek designs that involve remediation of environmentally damaged areas. Indeed, contaminated soil can be helped by properly designed water management – for instance, designs can include choosing plants specifically meant to biologically treat water containing certain contaminants.
Active participation
In sizing up the LEED point potential of water features, it’s important to recognize that the water features will help earn credits relative to specific situations. The LEED point system and the relative value a “functional” water feature can bring opens the discussion of the role the designer can play in the final design of commercial complexes and residential developments.
PARA 20  Traditionally, designers in their more aesthetic or recreational roles are among the last consulted in a project. Until recently, in fact, fountains, swimming pools, spas, ponds, cascades or interactive water features have been seen as separate and divorced from everything else on site.
LAST PARAWith this new green philosophy, designers are becoming integral participants in the process of designing water reclaiming and recycling programs, and providing beauty with function.

MULLERAviram Müller is the founder of Karajaal, a Quebec-based company that designs and engineers distinct and interactive venues using water, lighting effects, fountains and pools.
A graduate of Frankfurt University, Aviram has dedicated 25 years to the creation and development of water-based art. Aviram is recognized by his peers as an artist and sculptor with a strong engineering and technical foundation.

 

HOW EARTH MADE US – WATER ~ A MUST SEE VIDEO!!!

HOW EARTH MADE US_WATER

How Earth Made Us – The untold story of history.

This is part 2 in Professor Iain Stewart’s series, “How Earth Made Us”.  I highly recommend you take an hour to watch it as it is superlative!!!

Our planet has amazing power, and yet that’s rarely mentioned in our history books. This series tells the story of how the Earth has influenced human history, from the dawn of civilisation to the modern industrial age. It reveals for the first time on television how geology, geography and climate have been a far more powerful influence on the human story than has previously been acknowledged. A combination of epic story telling, visually stunning camerawork, extraordinary locations and passionate presenting combine to form a highly original version of human history.

Youtube video, “How Earth Made Us – Water”, uploaded on May 16, 2011 – Of all our planet’s forces perhaps none has greater power over us than water.  For me water is the most magical force on earth.  The presence of water shapes, renews and nourishes our planet.  It’s our planet’s life blood, that pumps through it continuously…

Water

This time he explores our complex relationship with water. Visiting spectacular locations in Iceland, the Middle East and India, Iain shows how control over water has been central to human existence. He takes a precarious flight in a motorised paraglider to experience the cycle of freshwater that we depend on, discovers how villagers in the foothills of the Himalayas have built a living bridge to cope with the monsoon, and visits Egypt to reveal the secret of the pharaohs’ success. Throughout history, success has depended on our ability to adapt to and control constantly shifting sources of water.

Discover why societies have succeeded or failed, and how the environment has influenced every aspect of our history from art to industry, religion to war, world domination or collapse. Visiting some of the most iconic places on Earth, How Earth Made Us overturns preconceptions about our civilisations and our cultures to offer a new perspective on who we are today.

~Youtube video presented by Professor Iain Stewart ~

Link to ~ How Earth Made Us—a masterly BBC documentary

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2012/04/eart-a21.html

 
Our heartfelt thanks to Professor Stewart
for his exceptional accomplishment!

A MUST SEE! ~ STEPWELL IN RAJASTHAN, INDIA

CHAND BAORI STEPWELL ~ RAJASTHAN, INDIA

Stepwells, also called bawdi or baoli, are unique to India… and are often of architectural significance, just like Chand Baori.

Searching the web and YouTube I found numerous short videos of many different stepwells in India and chose this one as the photography seems to be the best:

Youtube video, “india, chand baori reservoir”, uploaded by  fluglehrer on Mar 25, 2008 ~ “gigantic sight ! a must!”


The following excerpts are taken from the article,  “Chand Baori Step Well in Rajasthan, India“, posted by MumbaiRock on October 16, 2012

Chand Baori in Abhaneri village in eastern Rajasthan, India, is one of the most overlooked landmarks in the country.  It is one of the oldest stepwells in Rajasthan… among the biggest in the  world… This incredible square structure is 13 stories deep, and lined along the walls on three sides are double flight of steps… Built during the 8th and 9th century by King Chanda of Nikumbha Dynasty, the well provided the surrounding areas with a  dependable water source for centuries before modern water delivery systems were introduced.  As the green water at the base attests, the well is no longer in use, but it makes for an interesting stop-over to an architecturally impressive structure that is over 1000 years old.  There’s also a temple adjoining the well for visitors to explore… The well’s sheer endlessly appearing geometric complexity made of stairs and steps ensured that Rajput people had access to water at any time of the year, and from all sides… The large mouth of the well functioned as a rain catching funnel that contributed to the water seeping in from the porous rock at the bottom… At the bottom the well the air is always about 5-6 degrees cooler than at the top.

The steps surround the well on three sides while the fourth side has a set of pavilions built one atop another.

The side that has the pavilions have niches with beautiful sculptures including religious carvings.  There is even a royal residence with rooms for the King and the Queen and a stage for the performing arts.

The well is now a treasure managed by the Archeological Survey of India.

http://www.mumbairock.com/profiles/blogs/chand-baori-step-well-in-rajasthan-india

National Aquarium - WATERblog

A Blog for the National Aquarium Community

Bucket List Publications

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National Aquarium - WATERblog

A Blog for the National Aquarium Community

Bucket List Publications

Indulge- Travel, Adventure, & New Experiences

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.