Category Archives: International Event

Remembrance Day Canada ~ Standing Strong & True!

I’ve decided to add this 2010 Youtube music video, “Standing Strong & True (For Tomorrow)” to a previous blog as it reflects our young men and women in the Canadian Forces facing more recent conflicts on our behalf.  The song lyrics and the performing  Canadian artists are impressive.  “Standing Strong and True (For Tomorrow),” is an all-star Canadian country single dedicated to fallen Canadian soldiers and their families.

link for “Standing Strong and True” lyrics ~

http://www.metrolyrics.com/standing-strong-and-true-lyrics-various-artists.html

“In a war, everyone suffers…
never let it happen again.”

Music played an important role in the lives of Canadian soldiers. It also plays an integral part of The War Amps military heritage documentaries.

Accompanied by archival war footage and period photographs, several well-known Canadian musicians have used their talents to create beautiful and touching songs. The songs recall the sadness of families separated during wartime, as well as the courage and heroism of the Canadian troops who volunteered to go off to war.

“War is not heroics nor is it pride
It’s a shame to lose all those precious lives
Life is too short. We could love for so long
                                 Where’s the glory? NEVER AGAIN!”
Please see below for composer’s photo and short bio. 

YouTube video, “Never Again The War Amps

Sun Media photographer Pete Fisher presents a video tribute to our fallen Canadian soldiers ~ uploaded by on Jan 1, 2009.   It warms my heart to see that 351,228 viewers have watched this video. 

I, along with thousands of other Canadian families, suffered the loss of loved ones during WWI.  My father served in WW1 and was gassed in the Battle of Ypres, France.  He died as a direct result years later.  (See footnote with details of this battle).  It’s so very heart warming to witness the obvious heartfelt gratitude and thanks expressed for fallen members of our Canadian Military as people turn out by the thousands to honor our fallen as they make their journey home, along the Highway of Heroes, to their final resting place.

YouTube video, “Highway of Heroes Tribute” ~

Links ~

http://www.waramps.ca/military/resource_kit.html 

Robin Moir is the composer of the song in the video, “Never Again”.  Robin is a writer, producer, director who began her career as a singer/songwriter spending many years performing concerts across Canada and the USA. In 1967 she performed for Queen Elizabeth II on July 1st during Canada’s centennial celebrations on Parliament Hill. In the late 1970s, she was nominated for a Juno Award for Best New Female Vocalist.  We were very fortunate to have Robin sing her memorable song at our Remembrance Day Service at church a number of years ago with my choir.

This is a time of grateful remembering. We are grateful for the privilege of living in this great country of ours complete with its many freedoms. We remember with grateful hearts, those who fought so valiantly so that we might enjoy these freedoms and live at peace. Many paid the supreme sacrifice for our freedom. To them we say “Thank you. We will never forget you.” To the families of those who fought and lost, please know that we will forever keep you in our thoughts and prayers.

I leave you with a very moving video/music uploaded to YouTube by on Oct 26, 2010, “Remembrance Day Canada (‘Soldiers Cry’ by Roland Majeau)”.

Please read the story behind the video on YouTube.

Footnote ~ Information from Wikipaedia ~  (In the First Battle of Ypres (12 October to 11 November 1914), the Allies captured the town from the Germans. The Germans had used tear gas at the Battle of Bolimov on 3 January 1915. Their use of poison gas for the first time the on 22 April 1915 marked the beginning of the Second Battle of Ypres, which continued until 25 May 1915. They captured high ground east of the town. The first gas attack occurred against Canadian, British, and French soldiers; including both metropolitan French soldiers as well as Senegalese and Algerian tirailleurs (light infantry) from French Africa. The gas used was chlorine. Mustard gas, also called Yperite from the name of this city, was also used for the first time near Ypres, in the autumn of 1917.   Ruins of Ypres -1919.  Of the battles, the largest, best-known, and most costly in human suffering was the Third Battle of Ypres (21 July to 6 November 1917, also known as the Battle of Passchendaele), in which the British, Canadians, ANZAC, and French forces recaptured the Passchendaele Ridge east of the city at a terrible cost of lives. After months of fighting, this battle resulted in nearly half a million casualties to all sides, and only a few miles of ground won by Allied forces. During the course of the war the town was all but obliterated by the artillery fire.)

Remembrance Day Canada – Standing Strong & True!

I’ve decided to add this 2010 Youtube music video, “Standing Strong & True (For Tomorrow)” to a previous blog as it reflects our young men and women in the Canadian Forces facing more recent conflicts on our behalf.  The song lyrics and the performing  Canadian artists are impressive.  “Standing Strong and True (For Tomorrow),” is an all-star Canadian country single dedicated to fallen Canadian soldiers and their families.

link for “Standing Strong and True” lyrics ~

http://www.metrolyrics.com/standing-strong-and-true-lyrics-various-artists.html

“In a war, everyone suffers…
never let it happen again.”

Music played an important role in the lives of Canadian soldiers. It also plays an integral part of The War Amps military heritage documentaries.

Accompanied by archival war footage and period photographs, several well-known Canadian musicians have used their talents to create beautiful and touching songs. The songs recall the sadness of families separated during wartime, as well as the courage and heroism of the Canadian troops who volunteered to go off to war.

“War is not heroics nor is it pride
It’s a shame to lose all those precious lives
Life is too short. We could love for so long
                                 Where’s the glory? NEVER AGAIN!”
Please see below for composer’s photo and short bio. 

YouTube video, “Never Again The War Amps

Sun Media photographer Pete Fisher presents a video tribute to our fallen Canadian soldiers ~ uploaded by on Jan 1, 2009.   It warms my heart to see that 351,228 viewers have watched this video. 

I, along with thousands of other Canadian families, suffered the loss of loved ones during WWI.  My father served in WW1 and was gassed in the Battle of Ypres, France.  He died as a direct result years later.  (See footnote with details of this battle).  It’s so very heart warming to witness the obvious heartfelt gratitude and thanks expressed for fallen members of our Canadian Military as people turn out by the thousands to honor our fallen as they make their journey home, along the Highway of Heroes, to their final resting place.

YouTube video, “Highway of Heroes Tribute” ~

Links ~

http://www.waramps.ca/military/resource_kit.html 

Robin Moir is the composer of the song in the video, “Never Again”.  Robin is a writer, producer, director who began her career as a singer/songwriter spending many years performing concerts across Canada and the USA. In 1967 she performed for Queen Elizabeth II on July 1st during Canada’s centennial celebrations on Parliament Hill. In the late 1970s, she was nominated for a Juno Award for Best New Female Vocalist.  We were very fortunate to have Robin sing her memorable song at our Remembrance Day Service at church a number of years ago with my choir.

This is a time of grateful remembering. We are grateful for the privilege of living in this great country of ours complete with its many freedoms. We remember with grateful hearts, those who fought so valiantly so that we might enjoy these freedoms and live at peace. Many paid the supreme sacrifice for our freedom. To them we say “Thank you. We will never forget you.” To the families of those who fought and lost, please know that we will forever keep you in our thoughts and prayers.

I leave you with a very moving video/music uploaded to YouTube by on Oct 26, 2010, “Remembrance Day Canada (‘Soldiers Cry’ by Roland Majeau)”.

Please read the story behind the video on YouTube.

Footnote ~ Information from Wikipaedia ~  (In the First Battle of Ypres (12 October to 11 November 1914), the Allies captured the town from the Germans. The Germans had used tear gas at the Battle of Bolimov on 3 January 1915. Their use of poison gas for the first time the on 22 April 1915 marked the beginning of the Second Battle of Ypres, which continued until 25 May 1915. They captured high ground east of the town. The first gas attack occurred against Canadian, British, and French soldiers; including both metropolitan French soldiers as well as Senegalese and Algerian tirailleurs (light infantry) from French Africa. The gas used was chlorine. Mustard gas, also called Yperite from the name of this city, was also used for the first time near Ypres, in the autumn of 1917.   Ruins of Ypres -1919.  Of the battles, the largest, best-known, and most costly in human suffering was the Third Battle of Ypres (21 July to 6 November 1917, also known as the Battle of Passchendaele), in which the British, Canadians, ANZAC, and French forces recaptured the Passchendaele Ridge east of the city at a terrible cost of lives. After months of fighting, this battle resulted in nearly half a million casualties to all sides, and only a few miles of ground won by Allied forces. During the course of the war the town was all but obliterated by the artillery fire.)

OMG! My heart just jumped up to my throat!

BALLOON HIGHLINE

Hold on to your your favorite squeeze and/or whatever furniture you can grab and you might also want to take your heart medicine if necessary – you’re not going to believe this!
O.k. so my collage above is not what you’d expect for this post’s topic, but I didn’t want to give away the secret too soon!)

“You won’t get much closer to Skylining than this!…
We left winter behind and headed to the sun to try and turn our latest dream into reality…

All of the Skyliners team was excited to put their skills to the test on such an amazing line…
BALLOON HIGHLINE2
Thanks to the talent of the pilots, we came really close…
We’ll be going back again very soon to make it happen – watch this space!”

Youtube video, “The Balloon Highline” published on Feb 6, 2014 

Published on Feb 7, 2014 Globus Kon Tiki s’ajunta amb Skyliners per assolir un nou repte: passar per una cinta (Slack Line), d’un globus a un altre des de una alçada de 600 metres. L’event va tenir lloc a la comarca de la Noguera a Catalunya el 31 de gener de 2014. Translation: Globus Kon Tiki meets Skyliners to achieve a new challenge: to spend a tape (Slack Line), a balloon one other from from a height of 600 meters. The event took place in the region of Catalonia in Walnut January 31, 2014

O.K. Now breathe………….
Ah-h-h – this is more my style – magnificent and breathtaking panoramic videography,  colourful balloons, and gentle calming music – Enjoy! ~ 
Youtube video, “Hot air ballooning in Cappadocia, Turkey”, published on 5 Nov 2013 by GaborVids ~

Support our team by watching our feature documentaryhttps://www.reelhouse.org/seb.montaz/…

http://www.facebook.com/theSkyliners
http://www.globuskontiki.com
http://www.sebmontaz.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHRISTMAS/NEW YEARS QUIZ ~ HAVE FUN WITH THIS!

 CHRISTMAS QUIZ  

  CHRISTMAS BLOG ANIMATED4~ SCROLL DOWN FOR ANSWERS ~

1)  Who invented electric Christmas lights?
Thomas Edison
Gottlieb Daimler
James Naismith 

2)  How many people in the world know the carol “Silent Night”?
10 million
1 billion
3 billion

3)  What is the ninth candle in the Hanukkah Menorah for?
It lights the other candles
It’s blown out first
It’s a candle for children

4)  Who flies through the air and fills children’s stockings with candy and presents?
Santa Claus
La Befana

5)  British people wear paper crowns at Christmas events because of
The Three Kings
Queen Elizabeth
Christmas crackers

6)  What does “Auld Lang Syne” mean?
Old friends
Long, long ago
Good memories

7)  Why do Southerners eat black-eyed peas and greens on New Years’ Day?
To honor farmer forefathers
To cure a hangover

8)  Who first used live people in a Nativity scene?
St. Francis of Assisi
Queen Victoria
Pope Pius XII

9)  How much does the New Year’s Eve ball in Times Square weigh?
5,619 pounds
11,875 pounds
21,200 pounds

10)  Candied lotus seeds are a popular Chinese New Year’s treat and are said to bring:
Good luck
Better finances
Boy children

11)  Pointsettias get their name from?
Their lovely, pointed leaves
The Spanish word for flower
A U.S. minister to Mexico

12)  What sports activity is celebrated on Christmas Day in Ireland?
Cross country skiing
Skating
Swimming

13)  What do children leave outside the door in Germany on Nikolaustag on December 6th?
toque
mitten
boot

14)  In areas of France what burns in homes from Christmas Eve to New Year’s Day?
incense
simmering fruit
a log

15)  What do Norwegian families hide on Christmas Eve?
boots
knives
brooms

CHRISTMAS BLOG ANIMATED4      ~ Here are your answers ~ 

CHRISTMAS STRING LIGHTS1)  Thomas Edison – he not only invented the electric light bulb, He also created the first strand of electric lights. He hung them outside his New Jersey lab during Christmas season in 1880. Lights for Christmas trees weren’t sold to the public until 1917.

SILENT NIGHT2)  3 billion – Of the roughly 7 billion people on Earth about 3 billion are familiar with “Silent Night.” The carol was first heard on Christmas Eve 1818, in Oberndorf, Austria, and was written by Joseph Mohr and Franz Gruber. It has been translated into more than 300 languages

HANNUKKAH MANORAH3)  It lights the other candles – The ninth candle is the “shamash,” which is used to light the other candles. Hanukkah is an eight-day Jewish holiday marking the defeat of an army that had invaded Israel. After the victory, the Jews celebrated at the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. They found enough oil to light the lamp for only one day. But the oil lasted eight days and nights, and it’s celebrated as a miracle.

SANTA CLAUS4)  Both – American children know Santa, but Italian children wait for La Befana, the good witch who rides a broomstick the night ofLA BEFANA January 5th. The children wake up on January 6th – the Feast of the Epiphany – to find toys, candy, and fruit that she left. Some families in Hispanic communities in the U.S. practice traditions brought from Latin  American countries. Children place hay and water under their beds the night of January 5, for the camels of the Three Kings, and wake up to find presents.

CRACKERS5)  Christmas crackers (pretty paper tubes that you pull apart) – are a British tradition. The tubes pop open with a bang when pulled. Inside, there’s a small gift like a mirror and a joke written on a piece of paper. There’s also a paper crown, a nod to the Lord of Misrule, an old custom that put a peasant in charge of village Christmas events. Brits wear the crown and read the joke out loud.

AULD LANG SYNE6)  long, long ago – This well-known New Year’s Eve tune is from a poem by Robert Burns, based on a Scottish folk song. “Should old acquaintance be forgot, and never brought to mind? Should old acquaintance be forgot, and auld lang syne.” It’s a tribute to days gone by.  The words are in the Scots language, which today is spoken in the Lowlands and Northern Isles of Scotland.

PEAS AND GREENS7)  To bring wealth in the New Year – The black-eyed peas stand for coins. The greens or collards stand for paper money. Eating these dishes is supposed to bring good luck and wealth in the coming year.  Cultures around the world celebrate the New Year with foods meant to bring prosperity: fish in China, lentils in Italy, and gold-colored food in Peru. (The tint often comes from the spice turmeric.)

NATIVITY SCENE8)  St. Francis of Assisi – widely known today for his love of animals — created the first live nativity scene, in 1223 in the Italian village of Greccio. He recreated the scene of Christ’s birth with people playing Mary and Joseph and animals from the village as the creatures in the stable.

N Y EVE BALL9)  11,875 – It’s also covered with 2,688 Waterford crystal triangles. Americans began dropping a giant ball at New Year’s Eve in 1907. The first was a 700-pound iron-and-wood beauty lowered from a flagpole atop One Times Square.

LOTUS10)  Boy children – In China, lotus seeds symbolize male children. Eating the sweetened seeds is supposed to bring boy babies into your family.

POINTSETTIAS11)  U.S. minister to Mexico – The poinsettia is native to Mexico, where it’s used to decorate churches at Christmas. It gets its name from American diplomat Joel Poinsett, who introduced the flower to the U.S. in the 1800s. The red and white parts of the poinsettia — which some people think are petals — are actually colored leaves called bracts.

IRISH12)  Swimming!  There are some intrepid people who get out in the open air and away from all the excess on Christmas morning, though it can be fairly miserable out there at that time of year.  One long standing tradition in Sandycove, a suburb of South Dublin is the Christmas Day Swim – in the sea. Yes, in Ireland, in December, they swim in the freezing Irish sea – and let me tell you it is MUCH colder even that it looks in the picture! Crazy, but they say it’s fun!

BOOT13)  On December 6 is Nikolaustag, St. Claus day. A shoe or boot is left outside the door on Dec.5 with hopes the following morning you find presents, if you were good – or, unfortunately a rod if you had been bad.

BURNING LOG14)  In southern France, it is a tradition among some families to burn a log in their homes from Christmas Eve until New Year’s Day. In olden days, farmers would use a part of this log to make the wedge for the plough as good luck for the next harvest. In Lyon, December 8th is annually celebrated as the Festival of Lights or ‘fete des lumieres’ in honour of Mother Mary for all the blessings through the year. Other important French traditions include the Nativity Scene, the midnight feast called ‘le reveillon’ and Pere Noel.

BROOMS15)  Norwegian legend has it that when Christmas Eve arrives it brings with it a series of evil spirits and witches.  The evil spirits and witches could not just walk from place to place but needed a form of transportation to fly around and they often used brooms for this.  It is Christmas tradition for Norwegian families to hide all brooms, mops and brushes on Christmas Eve so that these trouble makers can not use them.

christmas_animated_gifs_05

link ~  http://www.webmd.com/balance/rm-quiz-holiday-traditions?ecd=wnl_wmh_122513&ctr=wnl-wmh-122513_ld-stry&mb=rHKmwhyk2PvM%40wJ88MZOheHnVev1imbCTxvaq5IOIhg%3d

     

 

MOTHERS DAY ~ A TRIBUTE TO MOTHERS EVERYWHERE

FLOWERS FUZZY COLLAGE

COLUMBINE2I thought it would be interesting to check into the history of Mothers Day and also thought it would be nice to create a YouTube video with inspirational quotes on motherhood. I’d appreciate you watching it on YouTube and ‘liking it’. I dedicated my Mothers Day tribute to my amazing daughter who is the fabulous Mom of my 5 year old grandson and is my inspiration, “my hero” and “the wind beneath my wings” ~ I hope you enjoy it and you are welcome to share with all the Moms near (or far) and dear to you.

EARLIEST HISTORY OF MOTHERS DAY:
CRONUSThe earliest history of Mothers Day dates back to the ancient annual spring festival the Greeks dedicated to maternal goddesses. CRONYS AND RHEAThe Greeks used the occasion to honor Rhea, wife of Cronus and the mother of many deities of Greek mythology. Ancient Romans, too, celebrated a spring festival, called Hilaria dedicated to Cybele, a mother goddess. It may be CYBELEnoted that ceremonies in honour of Cybele began some 250 years before Christ was born. The celebration made on the Ides of March by making offerings in the temple of Cybele lasted for three days and ROMAN CELEBRATIONSincluded parades, games and masquerades. The celebrations were notorious enough that followers of Cybele were banished from Rome.

History of Mother’s Day in England:
MOTHERING SUNDAYThe more recent history of Mothers Day dates back to 1600s in England. Here a Mothering Sunday was celebrated annually on the fourth Sunday of Lent MOTHERING SUNDAY2(the 40 day period leading up to Easter) to honor mothers… Custom of celebrating Mothering Sunday died out almost completely by the 19th century. However, the day came to be celebrated again after World War II, when American servicemen brought the custom and commercial enterprises used it as an occasion for sales.

Mother’s Day in the United States:
JULIE WARD HOWEThe idea of official celebration of Mothers day in US was first suggested by Julia Ward Howe in 1872. An activist, writer and poet Julia shot to fame with her famous Civil War song, “Battle Hymn of the Republic“. Julia Ward Howe suggested that June 2 be annually celebrated as Mothers Day and should be dedicated to peace.
ANNA JARVISAnna Jarvis is recognised as the Founder of Mothers Day in US. Though Anna Jarvis never married and never had kids, she is also known as the Mother of Mothers Day, an apt title for the lady who worked hard to bestow honor on all mothers… The hard work paid off. By 1911, Mother’s Day was celebrated in almost every state in the Union and on May 8, 1914 President Woodrow Wilson signed a Joint Resolution designating the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.

Mother’s Day in Canada:
TULIPSIn North American country of Canada, Mothers Day is the most popular festival after Christmas and Valentines Day. Just as in USA, Mothers Day in Canada is celebrated in the second Sunday in the month of May. People pay tribute to their mothers on the day and thank them for their constant support and love.  Here in Ottawa we have the Tulip Festival which coincides with Mother’s Day.

http://www.conservapedia.com/Mother’s_Day

fLORAL GREETING FOR BLOG

COURAGE DOESN’T ALWAYS ROAR ~ IWD 2013

WOMEN'S DAY 2013PHOTOPAD

When we think about courage, it’s usually stories of heroism that come to mind. But for millions of women around the world, courage comes in a very different way. It’s a quiet voice that gives them the strength to go on for another day. Take 3 minutes and be inspired by this new movie celebrating the courage and strength of women just like you.

As today, March 8th is International Women’s Day observed around the world, I thought it would be most fitting to share this Simple Truths video, ” Courage Does Not Always Roar” with you. 

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY CROPPED

I’m surprised, but pleased to read that it is an official  holiday in many countries  ~ the following excerpts are from http://www.internationalwomensday.com/about.asp                                                                         “IWD is now an official holiday in Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China (for women only), Cuba, Georgia, Guinea-Bissau, Eritrea, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Madagascar (for women only), Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Nepal (for women only), Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and Zambia. The tradition sees men honouring their mothers, wives, girlfriends, colleagues, etc with flowers and small gifts. In some countries IWD has the equivalent status of Mother’s Day where children give small presents to their mothers and grandmothers…

Annually on 8 March, thousands of events are held throughout the world to inspire women and celebrate achievements. A global web of rich and diverse local activity connects women from all around the world ranging from political rallies, business conferences, government activities and networking events through to local women’s craft markets, theatric performances, fashion parades and more.

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY CROPPEDMany global corporations have also started to more actively support IWD by running their own internal events and through supporting external ones. For example, on 8 March search engine and media giant Google some years even changes its logo on its global search pages. Year on year IWD is certainly increasing in status. The United States even designates the whole month of March as ‘Women’s History Month‘.

So make a difference, think globally and act locally !! Make everyday International Women’s Day. Do your bit to ensure that the future for girls is bright, equal, safe and rewarding.