Category Archives: Water

Student Ke Shuai wins high praise at World Water Week in Stockholm

For 18 years, Stockholm Junior Water Prize has congregated the world’s most imaginative young minds for an outstanding competition in the capital of Sweden, encouraging their continued interest in water and sustainability issues.

Each year, thousands of participants in over 30 countries all around the globe join national competitions in hopes of earning the chance to represent their nation at the international final held during the World Water Week in Stockholm.

The national and international competitions are open to young people between the ages of 15 and 20 who have conducted water-related projects of proven environmental, scientific, social or technological significance. The projects range from local or regional to national or global topics.


Chinese student Ke Shuai wins high praise at World Water Week event

STOCKHOLMStockholm, Sweden 

The following youtube video, was published on Aug 24, 2015 by New China TV, It’s not the whims of a 15-year-old, Ke Shuai.  Instead, it’s his UAV water quality monitoring project that has stirred a sensation at World Water Week.  And it caught the attention of experts.  UAV is the short form for unmanned aerial vehicle.        



Stockholm Water Prize celebrates
its Silver Jubilee

To celebrate the Silver Jubilee of the Stockholm Water Prize, we’ve created a video that sums up 25 years of honouring extraordinary water achievements. Since 1991, the Stockholm Water Prize Laureates have represented a broad range of water-related activities, professions and scientific disciplines from all over the world. Watch and share the video!

Canadian Drinking Water Tests Failing

Investigation finds Canada’s drinking water testing falls short – posted on Water Technology on JUNE 19, 2015

OTTAWA, Ontario — A CBC News investigation found that many Canadian cities’ drinking water is not tested for harmful contaminants, according to

Out of 18 cities, only Ottawa tested for all 75 substances outlined in the country’s drinking water guidelines, noted the article. The cities were asked to provide a list of health-related contaminants tested in water.

Calgary, Edmonton and Hailfax test for all but one of the substances, stated the article, while Quebec City tests for 62, Regina 52 and Winnipeg 49. Iqaluit and St. John’s test water for 20 contaminants.

Countries like the U.S. have mandatory requirements for water testing, reported the article, and experts believe Canada’s voluntary guidelines should be made enforceable as well. Currently, each province decides the frequency of its municipalities’ testing.

“They should be testing for everything, maybe not all the time, but at least on a periodic basis, rather than never testing for them at all,” said Eva Pip, a University of Winnipeg professor specializing in water quality and toxicology, in the article. “There is no such thing anymore as a pristine environment anywhere on this planet.”

The article reports that while some substances may not present an immediate threat, they do present long-term risks, even when present in low doses.

“Many of the chemicals which are of industrial origin could affect the liver, and in some cases they are carcinogens,” explained Chris Metcalfe, a Trent University professor in environmental and resource studies, in the article. “They can lead to the development of cancer if we’re exposed over a very long period of time.”

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDOnce again it seems that health issues relating to the water we drink are increasing and I along with many many others can breathe a sigh of relief. Although I am very concerned with this news, I do not have to worry about my drinking water.  Our Rainsoft Reverse Osmosis water treatment system removes the dangerous chemicals, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and herbicides leaving pure delicious tasting drinking and cooking water.

To learn more about our system please watch Martin’s video (below) and call for more information.

Eternally Pure Water Systems, Inc.
 5450 Canotek Rd, 66-67
 Ottawa, Ontario  K1J 9G5
Tel – (613) 742-0058
Fax – (613) 742-4209

Hours: Mon. – Fri. 9:00  – 5:00 

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Click here to read the entire article.

Wild Canadian Fish Party on Cocaine and Oxycodone



The blog title may seem frivolous to you folks, but our drinking water is next in line for these dangerous drugs leaching into our water. The three drugs mentioned are three of many abusive drugs.

The following article link to Munchies_ Food by VICE appeared in Drinking Water Canada’s newsletter,  ~ “Why Wild Canadian Fish Are on Cocaine and Oxycodone” by Alex Swerdloff July 27, 2015

   GRAND RIVERBust out your rhinestone snuffboxes and hit up your favorite restroom, party people. It’s time to head up to Ontario’s Grand River. Cocaine, morphine, and oxycodone—among other drugs of abuse, as the scientists call them—apparently flow freely in the waters there.

JOURNALThat’s right. A study recently published in the journal Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry shows that way more fish have been getting their Tony Montana on than we previously believed.

The study, which comes out of McGill University’s Department of Chemical Engineering, focused on the Grand River Watershed in Southern Ontario. The research shows that water discharged from wastewater treatment plants in the area has low levels of the aforementioned drugs in it, which could affect marine life and contaminate local sources of drinking water.

PLANTHere’s the problem. Households and chemical plants discharge both figurative and literal crap into the river. A wastewater treatment plant is supposed to clean out most of these contaminants. And some distance downstream, the water then goes through an additional water treatment plant that cleans it further and prepares it for human consumption.

DRUGSBut the study showed that small quantities of drugs were found in the river water coming out of the water treatment plant, and their concentration did not decline with distance downstream from the plant. To make matters worse, the drugs were not removed completely during drinking water treatment.

In short, plants, fish and other living things in the river were swimming in water dosed with small amounts of recreational and prescription drugs. Screw Nemo—these fish seem to have more in common with Rick Ross!

YARGOBut there could be a solution. Professor Viviane Yargeau, who was the lead author of the study, argues, “Improving our wastewater treatment processes can help clean up our drinking water.”

FISH BESTWhat’s new about this research is that the scientists found drugs in the water between the wastewater treatment plant and the drinking water treatment plant. Sure, the drinking water treatment plants got most of the drugs out of the water, but not all. Improvements upstream would keep the life aquatic—including plants, insects, and fish—from inadvertently indulging.

It seems to me, however, that the researchers forgot to ask one all-important question: How in the hell does a fish line up a rail without an opposable thumb?

Back to Professor Yargeau. She explains, “We believe that if improvements are made to wastewater treatment plants to protect the sources of drinking water, this will prove a more effective way of dealing with the problem in the long run—as this strategy would also protect the aquatic environment and all the plants, insects and fish that are found there.”

WATERNext to come will be a five-year project to look into improving wastewater treatment to keep contaminants like cocaine out of Canada’s drinking water. But five years is a while away, so the fish will keep partying on in the meantime.

After all, even marine life deserves some booger sugar once in a while.

So folks now the choice is up to you ~ wait for the hammer to fall  ~ or be proactive and protect your family’s health right now.  We have great options for you as a water treatment system company.

WATER DROPLET1_FOR BLOG ICONOur RainSoft Reverse Osmosis Water system is exactly what you and I need right now.  Martin, owner of Eternally Pure Water Systems, Inc. explains how this system works to provide you with safe, delicious and refreshing drinking water.  Watch the video below (truly worth your while) and call us.  We’re here to solve all your water treatment problems.

Eternally Pure Water Systems, Inc.
 5450 Canotek Rd, 66-67
 Ottawa, Ontario  K1J 9G5
Tel – (613) 742-0058
Fax – (613) 742-4209

Hours: Mon. – Fri. 9:00  – 5:00 

Consumers Choice Gold Winners – 2006, 07, 08, 09, 10 
Web Site –
Twitter –  
Blog –
Facebook –
A+ Rating with BBB

Hilarious Mr. Bean ~ Water Summer Fun

We are still not getting a break from the persistent intense heat wave here in Ottawa and surrounding area. According to an Environment Canada Meteorologist, we broke the all time record for Ottawa (set in 1949) a few days ago – sweltering heat plus the humidity!

YouTube video intro: ‘Now that summer is most definitely here, people are realizing how hot it can really get. So to cool off and relax, French compilation artist zapatou (Luc Bergeron) made this Water Time compilation from famous online videos involving H2O.’

“Water Time – Compilation” – Published on Jul 2, 2012 by
Music: Neopolitan Dreams by Lisa Mitchell (Sound Remedy Remix)
Lisa Mitchell site:
Video Editor: Zapatou (Luc Bergeron)

Luc Bergeron facebook:
Zapatou site:

Zapatou’s comments:
I really love to discover other people. I’m the kind of person who thinks that you can grow up from other people’s experience.
I have an unconditional passion for video editing, because by this medium I can share my emotions, my feeling to my audiences. By this medium, I can get you into my world.”

Je suis une personne qui adore découvrir les autres, car je trouve que c’est le meilleur moyen de m’enrichir moi-même. Depuis l’âge de 2 ans que je vis dans ma bulle et que je m’invente des histoires imaginaires drôles ou dramatiques.
J’ai une passion inconditionnelle pour les montages vidéo, puisque par ce médium je peux faire ressentir des émotions aux autres, en leur partageant une parcelle de mon monde.”

Now for the most hilarious YouTube video I’ve watched in a long, long time ~ Mr Bean at the Swimming Pool“, Uploaded by on Aug 25, 2009

Mr Bean goes to the swimming pool and tries to use the children’s slides. When he gets told off he heads off to the high dive board but is too scared to jump off. Classic Mr Bean clip from ‘The Curse of Mr Bean’.

The first episode of the original Mr Bean series starring Rowan Atkinson was first broadcast on 1st January 1990. Since then Mr Bean has become known all over the world. Created by Rowan Atkinson, Richard Curtis and Robin Driscoll, there were only 14 episode of the live action series ever made.

To find out more about Mr Bean visit:
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WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDA great cool down video and lots of ‘Mr. Bean’ laughs –                                 hope you enjoyed!

Why not organize your own H2O fun event?
Have a great weekend everyone.

Pouring Water From The Air – Award Winning Invention

This is a re-post of one of our popular blogs. 



For those facing water shortages, there is much to be thankful for when it comes to the inventive spirit. Thanks to young Australian inventor Edward Linacre, there may one day be no such thing as a water shortage for Australian farmers.

He recently won the £10,000 international James Dyson Award for a “low-tech” device – the Airdrop – that can draw water from the air, besting the work of 500 other inventors.

Linacre, a graduate of Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, says he wanted to solve the drought problem afflicting farmers in parts of Australia suffering from drought conditions. His solution, Airdrop, can harvest 11.5 milliliters of water for every cubic meter of air in the driest deserts such as the Negev in Israel, which has an average relative air humidity of 64 percent. A small-scale prototype Linacre installed at his parents’ house created about a liter of water a day. Linacre will use his prize money for further testing on increasing the yield.

As reported in The Sydney Morning Herald, instead of using complex, energy-intensive methods such as desalination, Airdrop’s source of water is abundant – the air – and so it can be used anywhere in the world.

Linacre’s Airdrop delivers water to the roots of crops in dry areas by pushing air through a network of underground pipes, cooling it down to the point where water condenses. The water can then be pumped to the roots of plants using drip irrigation methods.

This video interview,

posted by gizmag, helps explain the invention and the sound reasoning behind it. Linacre say he was inspired by the Namib beetle, which survives in landscapes that get just half an inch of rain per year by consuming the dew it collects on the hydrophilic skin of its back. Similarly, the desert rhubarb can harvest 16 times the amount of water than other plants in its region by using deep water channeling cavities in its leaves.

James Dyson, whose charity sponsors the award, said that the device is a low-tech solution that could be installed and maintained by the farmers themselves; it powers itself using solar panels. Dyson offered this insight into the clever invention:

“Biomimicry is a powerful weapon in an engineer’s armory. We chose Edward’s project because it was a very good and original solution to what has become a real problem.”

In addition to Linacre’s cash prize, a further £10,000 has been awarded to Swinburne University. Linacre said without the university’s help he would never have got his idea off the ground.

The James Dyson Award is run by the James Dyson Foundation and each year students of product design, industrial design or design engineering from around the world are invited to enter.

Image: James Dyson Awards

Source: EcoLocalizer (

Universal Water Access ~ “Muddled Policy…”

The following article, “Is Water A Right, Commodity, Or Service?”, Sara Jeromewritten by Sara Jerome, is taken from Water Online, posted June 12, 2015


Is water a commodity, a service, or a right? Recently, the debate has raged.

Daniel Van Abs, a water policy professor at Rutgers University,raised that question in a recent editorial published in NJ Spotlight. Van Abs is a water policy professor at Rutgers University who served as senior director for planning and science with the New Jersey Highlands Council, a water-protection implementation body. He has since retired from state government.

VAN ABS TO CROPVan Abs posed this question in his post: “Is water, as the U.N. states, a fundamental human right? Or is it a commodity that must be purchased at the going rate? Or is it a public service, in which the focus is on satisfying a social goal for provision of general needs?”

WATER HUMAN RIGHT TO CROP“Our history shows us that water supply has aspects of all three, which makes for a muddled policy setting. What do we do when basic water services exceed a customer’s ability to pay? As water rates rise to address the costs of system rehabilitation, enhanced drinking-water treatment, and source-water protection, we need to make sense of this mess,” he continued.Image result for Detroit water service
DETROITDetroit officials sparked protests last year by shutting off water service for thousands of delinquent customers, a move that prompted questions about whether shutoffs violate human rights. “The city, which continues to close as many as 400 accounts a day, has been widely criticized for its actions,” CBS News reported. United Nations advisers have argued that Detroit violated human rights during a frenzy of water shutoffs.

Image result for Detroit water serviceCities other than Detroit have also used water shutoffs to handle ratepayer delinquency. “In Michigan, Hamtramck, Warren, Pontiac, Eastpointe, Romulus and other cities have shut off delinquent customers as a way to improve collections. Elsewhere, so have other big cities such as Baltimore and St. Louis,” the Detroit Free Press reported.

Van Abs noted that New Jersey is no stranger to ratepayer delinquency. “New Jersey has areas of high poverty that have lost most of their industrial water customers. And much of the state’s water-supply infrastructure is old, if not decrepit,” he wrote.

Maude Barlow: “Water a right, not a commodity”, uploaded on Mar 18, 2009 – Canadian water activist Maude Barlow, leading protesters at the World Water Forum in Istanbul, says access to water is a fundamental human right.

To Van Abs, there are problems with calling water a guaranteed public service. “The costs could be handled like many other public services (such as police or courts), through the property tax, with local governments paying the water utility to provide the service. Doing so would remove incentives for efficient water use, unless provisions are made to limit the service by household to only what is necessary. Just imagine the problems with this approach. Government would have to track the number of people per household to ensure that a single-person household and a five-person household are provided for equitably,” he said.

There are also problems with calling water a commodity, since it means water shutoffs if customers cannot pay. “Clearly, this approach is not socially acceptable for those of limited means,” Van Abs writes.

Image result for water a guaranteed public serviceWhat if water were treated as a basic human right? For utilities to be empowered to treat service as such, policy changes would be needed in many places, including New Jersey.

“The problem is that New Jersey has no routine system for helping poor households afford water (and sewer) services. For residential energy, the NJ Board of Public Utilities regulates essentially all providers, and New Jersey has established several programs for temporary and long-term assistance. The same is not true of water supply utilities, since there are hundreds of government and privately owned water utilities in New Jersey. Establishing a unique household assistance program in each of these utilities would be an administrative nightmare, and some are too small or serve too poor an area to provide this aid,” Van Abs wrote.

“A broader approach is needed. New Jersey needs to take a hard look at how its poorest households will maintain access to water utility services as water and sewer rates increase. We shouldn’t allow the Detroit question to become the New Jersey problem,” Van Abs wrote.

Image credit: “running faucet,” Steve Johnson © 2010, used under an Attribution 2.0 Generic license:


This is a very serious universal topic – one that affects each and everyone of us.  Let’s make it a priority to be pro-active – do research, access local resources, attend meetings, lobby your Members of Parliament. There is a plethora of related videos on Youtube – well worth viewing!

World Oceans Day 2015 ~ Must See Videos

ocean dayThe following article, “4 Must-See Videos on World Oceans Day” was posted yesterday on EcoWatch 
The PEW Charitable Trusts | June 8, 2015

The ocean covers nearly three-fourths of the globe and is home to nearly half of the world’s known species—with countless yet to be discovered. It helps support more than 250 million people who depend directly or indirectly on fishing for their livelihoods. Still, human activities increasingly threaten its health. Although 72 percent of the world is covered by the ocean, less than 2 percent of these waters are fully protected.

Global Ocean Legacy, a project of Pew and its partners, works with local communities, governments, and scientists around the world to protect and conserve some of our most important and unspoiled ocean environments. These efforts have helped double the amount of protected marine habitat worldwide over the last nine years. That includes two recent achievements: expansion of the U.S. Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument in September 2014 and the British government’s announcement in March 2015 that it will create the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve in the Pitcairn Islands in the South Pacific Ocean.

Research shows that large, fully protected marine reserves are essential to rebuilding species abundance and diversity and protecting overall ocean health. To commemorate World Oceans Day on June 8, we invite you to watch four videos that highlight why fully protected marine reserves are critical to safeguarding these waters and the broader environment.

Caring for the environment has long been an important element of Palau’s culture. For centuries, chiefs have acted to protect these Pacific waters through the traditional “bul,” a moratorium on catching key species or fishing on reefs that provide critical habitat. Commonly referred to as “one of the seven underwater wonders of the world,” Palau’s ecosystems contain remarkable biodiversity, including more than 1,300 species of fish, more than 700 species of hard and soft coral, seven of the world’s nine types of giant clam, and non-stinging jellyfish. Pew was invited by Palau’s president to help create a large fully protected marine reserve in the island nation’s exclusive economic zone.

Located in the southeastern Pacific nearly 2,500 miles (4,000 kilometers) from mainland Chile, Easter Island has a rich cultural and environmental heritage. The island’s monumental sculpted heads have stood sentinel over this natural wonder, known as Rapa Nui in local Polynesian language, for centuries. Ancient Polynesians traveled through Easter Island’s waters for thousands of years using only the stars and the ocean for navigation. While largely unexplored, these seas are known to contain geological hot spots and areas of rare biodiversity that sustain highly migratory fish species. They also are known for ancient seamounts, 8.4 million to 13.1 million years old. Pew is working with the Rapa Nui community and the Chilean government to protect these ecologically important waters.

In March 2015, the British government announced its commitment to create the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve in the waters surrounding the Pitcairn Islands. A small U.K. overseas territory in the South Pacific, Pitcairn has one of the largest exclusive economic zones in the world. Within these waters lies one of the best-preserved ecosystems, a complex community of hard and soft corals that is home to hundreds of species of fish, including two found nowhere else on Earth. Pew, on behalf of the Global Ocean Legacy campaign partners, is working with the British government and the Pitcairn Island community to implement the Pitcairn Islands Marine Reserve to safeguard this important habitat for future generations.

The Kermadec region, a remote area between New Zealand’s North Island and Tonga, includes some of the most geologically active and biologically unusual features on Earth. Extending in places to a depth of more than 6.2 miles (10 kilometers), the Kermadec-Tonga Trench is the deepest in the Southern Hemisphere, five times deeper than the Grand Canyon. The waters are teeming with birds, whales, dolphins, fish, turtles, and many unique sea creatures, some that exist only there. The area provides important habitat for deep-diving mammals such as sperm whales. Half of the known beaked whales—at least 10 species—are thought to inhabit these waters, perhaps the world’s richest habitat for these rare and elusive animals.