Category Archives: Municipal water systems

USER FEES THAT PLEASE – KITCHENER, ONTARIO

USER FEES_WITH TEXT BOXThe following excerpts are taken from WaterCanada’s Mar/Apr issue article, ‘USER FEES THAT PLEASE’, by Nick Gollan – A new USER FEES SIGNuser pay and credit system helps Kitchener fund its municipal stormwater program.

assn of municipalitiesThe City of Kitchener received the Peter J. Marshall Municipal Innovation Award from the Association of Municipalities of Ontario and the Best Practices Award from Ontario Good Roads Association in 2011, for the implementation of its stormwater rate model.

GRAND RIVERStormwater flows within the Kitchener, Ontario are directed towards the Grand River, with Lake Erie acting as the ultimate receiver. Additionally, about 70 per cent of the drinking water for Kitchener residents comes from groundwater sources, with the balance from the Grand River; therefore, source water protection is critical, not only for the City, but across the watershed. In this respect, KSTORMWATER MANAGEMENTitchener is representative of many mid-sized Canadian communities. Located in southwestern Ontario, Kitchener has stormwater management (SWM) infrastructure assets valued at $300 million, covering a land mass of about 137 square kilometres. Property taxes are still the primary source of SWM program funding for Ontario municipalities. However, many municipalities recognize that some form of user pay approach needs to be developed in order to fairly and equitably distribute the increasing costs associated with this municipal service.
SHARED INITIATIVEImplementing user pay: The City of Kitchener, along with the adjacent City of Waterloo, collaboratively completed the SWM Program and Funding Review Study. AECOM was the lead consultant who undertook the feasibility study which included an extensive public consultation and review over the course of five years. CITY COUNCILBoth councils agreed to the study recommendations, and both adopted the overarching principles of a user pay approach. The implementation of a rate structure that rationally assigns costs of service to users is an innovative and important step forward and demonstrates the feasibility of an equitable and defendable stormwater rate structure… STORMWATER CREDIT PROGRAMUnder the utility structure, the impervious area is used as a surrogate to determine the amount of stormwater loading discharged to the municipal system and a credit policy provides financial incentives for property owners to implement and maintain private SWM best management practices (BMPs) to reduce stormwater loading.

KITCH COUNCILA tiered flat fee stormwater rate model has been in place since January 1, 2011. A rate tier is assessed to each land parcel based on their impervious area. The charge appears on the monthly municipal utility bill and is itemized as a SWM service. Moving to this type of funding model has allowed Kitchener to make significant improvements to the municipal stormwater infrastructure such as the Victoria Park Lake Improvements project completed in 2012. Other municipalities that fund stormwater programs in a similar fashion include the City of Waterloo, Ontario, the City of Edmonton, Alberta, and the City of Portland, Oregon, amongst hundreds of others in the United States.

BAG MONEYRewarding property owners for BMPs:  A key issue that arose during public debates related to the provision of credits for the adoption of BMPs by private property owners. The public wanted to be acknowledged and compensated for implementing BMPs such as vegetated swales, infiltration trenches, pervious pavement, extended detention stormwater basins, constructed wetlands, and other low impact development (LID) techniques. The objective of the city’s stormwater credit policy is to encourage the implementation of measures on private property in order to reduce total runoff volume and pollutant loading discharged to the city’s stormwater management system. Property owners qualify for stormwater rate credits when they demonstrate that their existing or proposed stormwater facilities or applied best management practices are functioning as approved. This policy enables the city to reward private property owners who are good stewards, in the  implementation of SWM best management practices while supporting the municipality’s SWM and sub-watershed policies…   

NICK GOLLANNick Gollan is manager of the stormwater utility at the City of Kitchener.

 

Topic related links –

http://www.waterloo.ca/en/living/creditprogram.asp

http://tpo-training.com/asset-management/kitcheners-stormwater-utility/

MUST READ! ~ RUST IN MUNICIPAL WATERPIPES

RUSTPHOTOPAD

CONCERNED ABOUT RUST DAMAGE CAUSED BY YOUR HOME WATER ? – SEE END OF BLOG.

Excerpts from “Rust Never Sleeps” – A lack of pipe cleaning standards contributes to perennial corrosion issues, from Mar/Apr issue of WaterCanada by Randy Cooper.

If a corroded metallic water pipe is cleaned but not coated or lined, it will simply corrode again, often at an accelerated rate. As aging water assets reach the end of their lives, leaks, breaks, and decreased hydraulic performance are increasingly evident across Canada. RUST6PHOTOPADOld metallic pipes are often rife with rust (due to corrosion), sediment, old coatings, and even biological growth that can negatively affect water quality. BURST WATER MAINAs pipes become clogged, greater pressures are required to deliver water… In water main systems, we have main bursts.

“Burst water main spout 250 ft. fountain”, published Oct. 29, 2012 – A burst water main sends a massive jet of water the height of a 13-story building raining down over a suburb in Melbourne, Australia.
TRENCHLESS2One solution for aging pipes is to clean them out and reline them using TRENCHLESStrenchless technologies.      These operations entail digging small surgical pits in the ground to gain access to buried water pipes. Once the pipe is opened and properly cleaned, a new liner can be installed and secured…
LINING2Liners are typically designed to last fifty years, greatly improving water quality and quantity, and substantially lowering maintenance costs, including leakage, main breaks, and pumping costs.
RUSTY WATER FROM PIPESA whole new set of challenges emerges as we prepare to install pipe liners. Firstly, if a corroded metallic water pipe is cleaned but not coated or lined, it will simply corrode again, often at an accelerated rate, producing foul-tasting, “red”(rusty) water in the process. In other words, while cleaning is necessary, it does not exactly solve the problem. Secondly, if the old pipe is not properly cleaned and prepared prior to lining, the new liner may eventually leak again or even fail prematurely. It is not enough to clean the pipe – it has to be cleaned properly, and this is no small 
task. SCRAPERThere are many old methods for pipe cleaning, each of which provides strikingly different outcomes. They vary from simply swabbing a pipe using a foam plug to radical intervention using a powered, metal scraper…  A judgment call determines what is actually clean. There is seldom, if ever, any quantitative measure of “clean” or “surface preparation,” or “dryness” or  “liner bond.” In fact, these terms are not defined anywhere. There is no federal,  provincial, or professional standard, nor is there any recognized manual of best practices that provides a substantive, quantitative measure for cleaning old water pipes. Given the challenge of failing  infrastructure, there simply must be.

RELINING PIPEEvery pipe liner that is brought into service will see variations in water pressure over its life, from system operating pressures to test pressures and transient surge pressures (also known as water hammer). In addition, these liners will have to stand up under soil and traffic loads, continued corrosion, temperature swings, and variations in water chemistry. In order to keep them leak-free over their design lives and tightly conforming to the old pipe, good cleaning practices need to be standardized with quantitative, measured outcomes… NACE LOGOFor instance, the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) is a professional body with expertise in pipeline corrosion.  NACE promulgates standards for the cleanliness and protection of metallic  substrates (including pipelines) against corrosion prior to coating in many related applications. Similarly, the American Society for Testing and Materials produces standards for the testing of cleanliness and bond. The adaptation and  Incorporation of these established practices and standards into a pipe cleaning  standard just makes sense. So, what are we waiting for? Government and  professional associations need to step forward now to develop and implement  a cleaning standard at the dawn of this renewal era.

 CONCERNED ABOUT RUST DAMAGE
CAUSED BY YOUR HOME WATER ???
– stains in sinks and tubs
– damage to pipes
– damage to appliances and fixtures
– health concerns – drinking water
– home resale value

 DON’T BE!
WE HAVE THE SOLUTION FOR YOU!
PLEASE SEE VIDEOS BELOW

RAINSOFTHOUSEWITHLOGO

RAINSOFT LOGO3ETERNALLY PURE WATER SYSTEMS, INC.
5450 CANOTEK ROAD, UNIT 66-67
OTTAWA, ON, K1J 9G5

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