Tag Archives: Al Jazeera

AUSTRALIA ~ TO CREATE MARINE HAVEN ~ PART 2

In the following breathtaking video, “Australia Great Barrier Reef“, you get a glimpse into the magnitude of the thousands of species that inhabit Australia‘s surrounding ocean ~ Uploaded by on Oct 3, 2009; Music: Tiesto-A Tear in the Open, Chilling Crew-For Better Moments, Tribal Trance-Orance Leopard Moon. Quote from YouTube video information: “My intentions were to make a quality trip video. We took a 4 day liveaboard with Mike Ball Dive expeditions ending up at the amazing Osprey Reef. The diving was incredible.”
This is a truly spectacular video and a must see in FULL SCREEN.  I am so envious of the divers who experience this thrill of a lifetime!

Some interesting data about the species that inhabit the waters of Australia’s ocean and the Great Barrier Reef ~

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef in the world. It consists of more than 2,900 coral reefs, 600 continental islands, 300 coral cays and thousands of species making it one of the world’s most complex and diverse ecosystems. The animals of the Great Barrier Reef include some 1500 species of marine fish, 360 species of hard corals, between 5000 and 8000 species of mollusks, 600 species of echinoderms, 17 species of sea snakes, 1500 species of sponges, 30 species of whales and dolphins, 6 species of marine turtles, 22 species of seabirds and 32 species of shorebirds which breed on the reef’s many small islands.

Marine Fish of the Great Barrier Reef

There are more than 1500 species of fish that inhabit the Great Barrier Reef. They range in size from the tiny gobies, some of which weigh less than one gram, to the larger bony fishes such as the tuskfish and potato cod, to the massive cartilaginous fishes such as manta rays, tiger sharks and whale sharks. Damselfish, wrasses and tuskfish are among the most abundant fishes on the reef. Other fish of the Great Barrier Reef include blennies, butterfly fish, triggerfish, cowfish, pufferfish, angelfish, anemone fish, coral trout, seahorses, sea perch, sole, scorpion fish, hawkfish and surgeonfish.

Hard Corals of the Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is home to about 360 species of hard corals including bottlebrush coral, bubble coral, brain coral, mushroom coral, staghorn coral, tabletop coral and needle coral. Hard corals, also known as stony corals, are a group of marine animals that live in shallow tropical waters and are responsible for building the structure of a coral reef. Colonies of hard corals grow in various shapes and sizes such as mounds, plates and branches. As previous coral colonies die, new ones grow on top of the limestone skeletons of their predecessors. Over time, this growth creates the three-dimensional architecture of a coral reef. Colonies of hard corals consist of thousands of small individual invertebrates referred to as coral polyps. Each polyp is radially symmetrical with a tube-like body that has a tentacle-rimmed mouth at the tip that it uses to feed.

Sponges and Echinoderms of the Great Barrier Reef

Over 600 species of echinoderms and more than 1500 species of sponges inhabit the Great Barrier Reef.

Echinoderms are bottom-dwelling marine invertebrates. They exhibit a type of radial symmetry called pentamerous symmetry in which their body can be divided into five equal parts around a central axis. The echinoderms of the Great Barrier Reef include sea urchins, sea cucumbers, sea stars, feather stars and brittle stars.

Sponges of the Great Barrier Reef include the yellow burrowing sponge, tubular sponge, thick yellow fan sponge.

Marine Reptiles of the Great Barrier Reef

There are 23 species of marine reptiles that inhabit the Great Barrier Reef including 6 species of sea turtles and 17 species of sea snakes. Occasionally, the saltwater crocodile also ventures out to forage on the reef, although such visits are quite rare.

The sea turtles that inhabit the Great Barrier Reef include the green turtle, loggerhead turtle, hawksbill turtle, flatback turtle, leatherback turtle and the Pacific ridley turtle. Some sea turtle species, such as the green turtle, loggerhead turtle and hawksbill turtle, nest on coral cays. The flatback turtle nests on continental islands and the green and leatherback turtles nest on mainland Australia. When not nesting, these sea turtle species use the waters of the Great Barrier Reef as foraging grounds.

Among the sea snakes of the Great Barrier Reef are the olive sea snake, the turtle-headed sea snake and the sea krait. All sea snakes are venomous.

Marine Mammals of the Great Barrier Reef

About 30 species of whales and dolphins frequent the waters of the Great Barrier Reef including humpback whales, Irrawaddy river dolphins, minke whales and spinner dolphins. Dugongs also inhabit the reef, feeding on the sea grasses that grow in the shallow inshore waters.

Not all of these marine mammals are permanent residents of the Great Barrier Reef. Minke whales and humpback whales visit the reef in winter. Other rorqual whales such as blue whales, fin whales and sei whales also migrate through the Great Barrier Reef region but do not stay for extended periods of time.

Mollusks of the Great Barrier Reef

More than 5000 species of mollusks live in the Great Barrier Reef. These include giant clams, cone shells, nudibranchs, octopus, cuttlefish and squid.
 
 
 
 

In this video, “Australia to create marine haven”, Australia’s Environment Minister, Tony Burke, unveils plans for the world’s largest network of protective marine parks.  Published on Jun 14, 2012 by

 

VIDEO ~ “Australia to build biggest marine reserve“, posted to YouTube by Al Jazeera‘s Andrew Thomas from Sydney, Australia on Jun 15, 2012 ~ The Australian government has announced the creation of the world’s biggest network of marine parks (3.3 million square metres), covering an overall area the size of “India”

This video, “Marine Life off Perth, Western Australia”, just released by the Ocean’s Institute, University of  Western Australia, showing a sequence of video footage captured off Perth, Western Australia.  The marine life shown in this sequence now has a brighter future thanks to the plan for marine sanctuaries off Australia’s South West. Published on Jul 4, 2012 by

 Once again, I hope you all realize how vital the work being done by the World Resources Institute Insights is and will find a way to support their efforts ~ insights.wri.org. 
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THE DEAD SEA ~ INTERESTING VIDEOS AND FACTS

The Dead Sea is unique not only because it is the lowest point on Earth, but also because it is filled with natural treasures, with zoological and botanic riches and because the region has witnessed remarkable historical events.  The following YouTube video, “The Dead Sea For New 7 Wonders”, uploaded by on Jul 6, 2011, is a wonder in itself ~ creatively crafted and narrated with impressive artistic sand art and accompanied by serene music.


Uploaded by on Aug 25, 2008

To reach the top of the world one would need to be an expert mountaineer, be willing to risk one’s life and be able muster almost superhuman strength. To reach the lowest place on earth, however, one only needs to be ready to enjoy sunshine, good weather and floating in the salty waters of the Dead Sea. 08/25/08

Time.com video ~ “Is the Dead Sea Dying?”
The Dead Sea has long attracted tourists for its mineral-rich waters. But now man-made problems are causing the sea to shrink.
http://www.time.com/time/video/player/0,32068,71715312001_2016083,00.html

“Land Sinking as Dead Sea shrinks” video

The Dead Sea in Jordan is shrinking at an alarming rate – a development that has led to the creation of some 3,000 sinkholes along the sea’s coasts. The sea has shrunk by a third since the 1960s when its major water source – the River Jordan – was diverted for upstream projects in Israel, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan. But for many people, the projects have backfired and the farmers who work near the sea say the once verdant and fertile land has become increasingly barren. Al Jazeera‘s Nisreen el Shamayleh reports from the village of Ghor Al Haditha.- Uploaded by on Feb 2, 2010

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT THE DEAD SEA ~ FROM EHOW and http://www.sfbsc.com/20-dead-sea-facts
The Dead Sea is 3 million years old and is located in the Jordan River Valley bordered by Israel and Jordan.
The Dead sea is 67 miles long and 11 miles wide at its widest point. It’s known as an endorheic (internally drained) lake and is one of the saltiest bodies of water on the planet.
The Dead Sea isn’t actually a sea at all! The Dead Sea is a saltwater lake (10 times saltier than any ocean) and is the lowest elevation on earth.
The shores of Dead Sea mark the lowest elevation on earth,
The atmosphere contains a unique UV filter that allows visitors to soak up therapeutic sunlight without the risk of burning.
Even if you can’t swim, you’ll never sink in the Dead Sea because the minerals make the water so dense you just bob on the surface like a cork.
Many visitors to the Dead Sea rub themselves with the salt or cover their bodies with the black mud, which are said to be good for relieving skin ailments and arthritis.
In 1947 a Bedouin shepherd discovered some of the oldest copies of books of the Bible in a cave above the Dead Sea. These 2,100-year-old manuscripts are known as the Dead Sea Scrolls.
The Dead Sea has been a part of human history since the Bedouin tribes lived in the area in 6,000 B.C.
Cleopatra had factories specializing in cosmetics and resorts built around the Dead Sea because it was one of her favorite places.
The Dead Sea was the most crowded leisure destination in Israel in 2011, with some 857,000 visitors during the year.
The BBC News reported in 2001 that environmentalists predict the sea will vanish by 2050 because the water that replenishes it is being rerouted to the countries of Jordan and Israel for various purposes.

Related link ~
The Telegraph – Can the Dead Sea be brought back to life?
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/9260302/Can-the-Dead-Sea-be-brought-back-to-life.html