Tag Archives: Arctic

Arctic/Antarctic Photography ~ Exceptional!!!

“The Fragile Beauty of Earth’s Polar Regions” was posted to discovermagazine’s web site Fri. Oct. 31, 2014.

Our planet’s most extreme environments are also some of its most threatened. 

CAMILLEPhotographer Camille Seaman first traveled to the Arctic in 1999. Between 2003 and 2011, she visited the Arctic and Antarctic on a yearly basis, ranging from one pole to the other as an expedition photographer aboard science vessels and commercial ships.
In her new book Melting Away, Seaman collects the photographs and essays that resulted from this exploration of our increasingly fragile polar regions. Here are some of our favorites:
RUNNING TO SEE

Running to See
Of this photo, taken on the Ross Sea in Antarctica, Camille writes:
“I watched the penguins travel across the ice for hours. They would waddle and fall, waddle and slide, and little by little they came all the way over to see our massive ship wedged in the sea ice. They looked at us by turning their heads first to the left, then to the right. After thirty minutes of them looking at us and us looking at them, the penguins decided they still didn’t know what we were or why we were there. They turned around and began their long journey back to their home.”

WHALEWhale Remains
This beach in Svalbard, Norway, was used by whalers since the early 1600s. The large whale vertebra in the foreground is evidence of their activities, which ended in the 1930s.

SUNSETPainterly Sunset
This photo, taken in the Antarctic Sound, put Camille in mind of the sunsets painted by J.M.W. Turner.
“In late February, as we headed north through the Antarctic Sound, we were fortunate to experience an Antarctic sunset. The colors were epic. The sun set in front of us and was rising behind us at the same time. Truly an experience I will never forget.”

HARSH LANDSCAPEHarsh Landscape
These oil drums, photographed outside the Brazilian base in Antarctica in 2007, foreshadowed the destruction of the base in a fire in 2012. “Antarctica is an unforgiving place,” Camille says.

CRYSTAL CLEARCrystal Clear
The jaw-dropping vista of the Rasmussen Glacier in Scoresbysund, eastern Greenland.

ALL AFLUTTERAll Aflutter
Of this photo taken in eastern Greenland, Camille writes:
“As our ship passed by this iceberg, which stood some three hundred feet out of the water, the birds were disturbed enough to leave their resting spots. I love the elephant-skin quality of the surface of this berg.”

SLOW COLLISIONSlow Collision
John Palmer, a doctor from Australia, also serves as a traffic operator for the icebreaker’s two helicopters. Here, he looks off into the distance where two massive icebergs are about to collide in a strong swell. One of the helicopters (too small to see in this image) had flown out to observe the icebergs up close.

CLOUD COVERCloud Cover
Camille writes,
“Antarctica is big, but the sky is bigger. The clouds that cover Antarctica can seem enormous, and when the clouds are lit by the sun magic can happen. I tend to spend as much time as I can out on deck, always looking, always ready. On this evening my diligence was rewarded.”

WALRUSWalrus v. Hut
This hefty walrus in Svalbard, Norway, makes the nearby hut look tiny by comparison.

BLUE DIAMOND ICEBERGBlue Diamond
This iceberg, calved off the Kongsfjord Glacier in Svalbard, Norway, showed its “true colors” thanks to the overcast day.

POLAR BEARFond Farewell
Of this young bear, photographed in Svalbard, Norway, Camille writes: “She looked at us as we sat in our zodiac. The passengers were eating chocolate covered strawberries and sipping champagne from long-stemmed glasses. I wondered what she thought as she looked at us. Her mother was about a thousand feet away and raised her head every now and then to get a good whiff of her cub. She was almost two years old, almost ready to leave her mother and go off on her own. I will probably never see her again. I wished her luck as I took this photo.”

http://discovermagazine.com/galleries/2014/dec/arctic#74686

GREEPEACE MEMBERS JAILED IN RUSSIA ~ PLEASE HELP!

GREENPEACE CREW JAILED

ARCTICAna Paula and 29 of her Greenpeace crewmates are trapped in a Russian jail for trying to save the Arctic from oil drilling. But our community could set them free if we help Greenpeace build a massive global outcry targeting Russia’s biggest global partners.

AVAAZLet’s reach 1 million to free the Arctic 30 — sign now by clicking below to add your name to this global petition:

http://www.avaaz.org/en/free_the_arctic_30_loc/?blTFScb&v=30369

The following Youtube videos provide additional background information on Greenpeace members charged with piracy and jailed in Russia.

Published on Oct 5, 2013 by Real World News, “Russia charges Greenpeace crew with piracy” – Russian investigators have charged the entire 30-member crew of a Greenpeace ship with piracy for a protest at an oil platform in the Arctic. The charge, which carries a 15-year prison term, was filed on Thursday against 16 members of the crew, including a prominent Russian freelance photographer.

Published on Oct 5, 2013 by News World, “Greenpeace protests worldwide for release of activists held in Russia”, – From Hong Kong’s harbour to London and Toronto, supporters of Captain Pete Wilcox and his crew of imprisoned Greenpeace activists are sending a message to Russia today: “Free the Arctic 30.”

LISTEN TO YOUR (PENGUIN) HEART ~ HOW PRECIOUS!!!

EMPEROR PENGUINSPHOTOPAD

LISTEN TO YOUR HEART ~ Mike Rowland, Film by Ruedi & Priska Abbühl Uploaded on Jan 29, 2011

Credit for this beautiful Emperor Penguin film goes to Ruedi & Priska Abbühl… And the Music … All glory goes to composer Mike Rowland from the album “My Elfin Friends,” who is currently compiling a book about the power of healing through music…I have the impression that to penguins, man is a different kind of penguin, unpredictable, occasionally violent, but tolerable company when he sits still and admires Nature and leaves it as he found it. ~Aetopus/AC

ANTARCTICA GLOBE FUZZY BORDER WHERE PENGUINS LIVE: Penguins do not live in the Arctic. They live on the shores of Antarctica and they also live in the south of Australia, New Zealand, America & Africa. The most northerly place that penguins live is on the Galapagos Islands which is near Ecuador in South America. Even though there is ice in Canada and the Arctic, penguins don’t live there or in the northern half of the world.

PENGUIN LIFE CYCLE LARGE IMAGENo other animal other than penguins can draw attention to the environmental damaged caused by oil and gas drilling (fracking and mountaintop removal), my reason for ending this video with the message “NO TO ARCTIC DRILLING!” ~Aetopus/AC
Please see my previous blog, “Fracking Hell ~ A Catastrophe!”                    

Here is a great YouTube video, “Birth and March of Emperor Penguins“, from Nature’s Great Events – In the coldest part of the planet, Emperor Penguins breed and give birth to their young, only to begin a great march toward the coast.

Links:
– PlanetSave: http://www.planetsave.com/
GreenpeaceUSA: http://www.youtube.com/greenpeaceusa

– Mike Rowland website: http://www.mikerowland.co.uk/
iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/mik…
Ambient Classical Mike and Jana Rowland: http://www.ambientclassical.com/

VIDEO ICONCROPPED

WASTEWATER AND THE CANADIAN ARCTIC ~ DO THEY MIX?

   BREAKING THE ICE

The following excerpts are taken from WaterCanada’s magazine article, “Breaking the Ice” – The trouble with implementing national wastewater standards in our country’s coldest climates, by Rob Jamieson and Wendy Krkosek

Managing sewage in Canada’s Arctic communities is very different than in the more populated southern regions of Canada. Arctic communities tend to have small populations of 100 to 2,000 people and many can only be accessed by air or by sea during the brief summer season. The cold climate and permafrost conditions generally prevent the use of underground pipes for transporting sewage from homes and buildings to a centralized sewage treatment plant. Therefore, people living in the Arctic often have to rely on a trucked system for water delivery and wastewater collection. Homes and other buildings are often equipped with two tanks: one for potable water, the other for wastewater. Drinking water deliveries and wastewater collection are usually conducted around every one to two days.

[Here is a very short YouTube video featuring the Sewage Lagoon and Windmills at Hooper Bay, Alaska, uploaded on Mar 18, 2010 ~ Temps +8F and 15 kt wind. 360 deg panorama of sewage lagoon and windmills, cemetery, and parts of Old Town.]

BREAKING THE ICE15In the majority of communities in the Canadian Arctic, the collected sewage is then transported to lagoons (or waste stabilization ponds) located on the outskirts of town. The lagoons are typically designed to hold a full year’s worth of sewage and are frozen for approximately nine months of the year. The lagoon contents thaw during the short summer season, which is approximately two to three months long. At the end of the summer, around early September, the water in the lagoon is pumped out into a natural tundra wetland, or directly into a lake, a river, or the ocean… The main advantages of these types of systems, and the reasons why they are used in small Arctic communities, are they are simple to operate and maintain, do not require energy inputs, and do not use mechanical equipment that would be susceptible to malfunction and failure in extreme cold climates. The problem, however, is that while these types of treatment systems have been well studied and tested in temperature climates, very little research has been conducted on how they perform in extreme arctic climates.
The impact of new regulations  Environment Canada has recently implemented new Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (WSER). The regulations include National Performance Standards (NPS) for municipal wastewater facilities, and specific timelines for upgrading facilities based on an environmental risk assessment framework. However, Environment Canada has specifically acknowledged the challenges that remote, northern communities will face in complying with the WSER. It was recognized that little information exists on the performance of wastewater systems operating in Canada’s far north, and the risk they pose to human and environmental health (CCME, 2009). Therefore, the regulations do not immediately apply to wastewater systems located in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and north of the 54th parallel in the provinces of Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador. A five-year grace period (ending in 2014) was provided to conduct research on northern wastewater system performance, and to propose alternative effluent quality guidelines….

BREAKING THE ICE18In response to the impending federal wastewater regulations and the need to identify cost-effective approaches for sewage management, the Government of Nunavut and Dalhousie University have developed a long-term research program focused on municipal wastewater management in Nunavut. The goals of the five-year project, currently in its third year, are to characterize the performance of existing lagoon and wetland wastewater treatment systems in Nunavut, assess the risks these systems pose to both human and environmental health, and identify and test strategies for improving the performance of passive treatment systems in Arctic climates. This work is also meant to provide the information needed to develop appropriate wastewater treatment standards for northern regions…

BREAKING THE ICE17To address this issue, Dalhousie University has collaborated with the Nunavut Research Institute to establish a water quality laboratory in Iqaluit. The lab is equipped to analyze for all primary wastewater parameters, and is also used to provide training to students enrolled in the VThe research conducted to date has produced some very interesting results. The unique summer arctic climate, where some communities receive up to 24 hours of sunlight, can have a number of advantages.

BREAKING THE ICE14CROPPEDFor example, extended daylight can stimulate a tremendous amount of algae growth in sewage treatment lagoons. These algae populations are capable of adding considerable amounts of oxygen to the lagoons through photosynthesis, which helps facilitate biological treatment processes. Trying to understand and harness the natural processes that occur within lagoons and tundra wetlands will be key to predicting and optimizing the performance of these systems.

BREAKING THE ICE16As these types of “open” treatment systems are heavily influenced by environmental factors such as ambient temperature and solar radiation, it will also be important to understand how their performance may be influenced by climate change. Initial findings also indicate that the characteristics of the water bodies which receive the treated effluent must be carefully considered in the establishment of appropriate treatment standards for the Arctic.

Interesting factoid for you all–did  you know Canada is has more kilometers in distance North-South than East-West…..

NATO PETITION ~ ARCTIC COUNCIL ~ WORTHWHILE!!

I’ve copied information I received from care2.com, regarding the petition I signed.  In my collage I’ve included a map of Greenland and Canada to point out the close proximity of the two countries and I find it rather alarming now that China’s interest in the area has been confirmed.

The Arctic Council is supposed to protect this incredible part of the earth from exploitation and destruction. But with climate change melting Greenland‘s waters, China is aggressively looking for a profit from mining and new shipping routes. Yet, it also wants to be an observer on the Council. Talk about conflict of interest!

I signed a petition voicing my concerns to NATO and Arctic Council officials and urged them to make sure they keep protecting the Arctic‘s natural resources.

I know you care about the health of our planet too, so I thought you’d want to join me and sign.

Here’s the link:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/869/770/954/dont-pave-the-arctic/

Greenland’s once frozen waters are now nearly ice-free. China’s not worried about the effect of global warming on the environment, though. They’re more concerned about getting first dibs on profiting from the area’s decline. 

China’s vying to become a permanent observer for the Arctic Council, a position that would allow them a say in decisions involving minerals and shipping
So far, they’ve been incredibly aggressive in the move to gain unclaimed Arctic regions. China has shown they’re uniquely qualified to access gas and oil sources in tricky locations in the northern Arctic. Since China also has an interest in exploring potential commercial shipping short-cuts through the area, they sent a ship to scout out possible routes.
Allowing countries to use the Arctic for shipping routes and mining will only expose Greenland waters to worse environmental distress.
Urge NATO and the Arctic Council to protect the Arctic and its natural resources!
 
If you did sign the petition thank you so very much.
 
 

CHINESE “SNOW DRAGON” ICEBREAKER FIRST

Chinese icebreaker sails to Atlantic Ocean and back via Arctic route, marking first for China

 

In this photo, provided by China’s Xinhua News Agency, Chinese icebreaker Xuelong, or Snow Dragon, is harbored in Shanghai, after an 85-day scientific quest across the Arctic ocean, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. The Chinese icebreaker has docked at Shanghai after becoming the first Chinese vessel to cross the Arctic Ocean. (AP Photo/Xinhua, Pei Xin)  

BEIJING, China – A Chinese icebreaker docked Thursday at Shanghai after becoming the first vessel from China to cross the Arctic Ocean, a landmark trip that is part of Beijing’s efforts to expand its presence in the Arctic.  With melting icecaps accelerating the opening of new shipping routes and the exploration of oil, gas and mineral deposits in the Arctic, China has been eager to gain a foothold in the region.   The icebreaker Snow Dragon returned to Shanghai after wrapping up a three-month mission that took it from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic via the Arctic, the Shanghai-based Polar Research Institute of China said in a statement. The vessel’s 119 crew members completed an oceanic survey in waters around Iceland with their Icelandic counterparts.  Though it has no territorial claims in the Arctic, China has been lobbying for permanent observer status on the eight-member Arctic Council in a bid to gain influence.  During summer months when they are passable, Arctic shipping routes between China and Europe are 40 per cent faster than travelling through the Indian Ocean, the Suez Canal and the Mediterranean Sea.  The institute’s statement said Snow Dragon gained “first-hand information about navigation in Arctic sea lanes as well as the oceanic environment, and carried out useful exploration and practice for our nation’s ships that use Arctic passages in the future.”

The following excerpts are taken from ShanghaiDaily.com, ‘Bai steers a steady course to an Arctic first’, by Evan Liang, 9.27.12

A LOCAL university teacher has become the country’s first woman to have sailed across the Arctic Ocean.  Bai Xiang’en, 28, was one of four people at the helm of China’s only icebreaker Xue Long, or Snow Dragon, on an expedition from July to September… be part of the 90-day science exploration… “The journey has greatly improved my navigation skills,” she said… Bai was the only woman among four people selected due to her extensive knowledge and experience of sea travel… while teaching at the university’s Merchant Marine College… Bai said sailing in the East Siberian Sea presented an enormous challenge, with its floating pack ice and icebergs. She had to exercise extreme caution at all times to avoid hitting icebergs or getting trapped between sheets of ice.

Link ~  http://www.calgaryherald.com/technology/Chinese+icebreaker+sails+Atlantic+Ocean+back+Artic+route+marking/7305937/story.html#ixzz28Ab4d5rV

http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/09/28/chinas-snow-dragon-icebreaker-makes-85-day-voyage-to-become-countrys-first-vessel-to-cross-arctic-ocean/

LET’S COOL OFF ~ ARTIC / ANTARCTICA ~ AH-H-H!

At this very moment so many of us are experiencing the unprecedented current heat wave that I thought it would be a great idea to be able to watch some videos to help us cool off ~ hope you enjoy your armchair visits to the top and bottom of our world ~ the Arctic and Antarctica.

Experience the peacefulness of the icebergs in the Arctic and belugas beneath the waves while listening to singer Demetra Penner’s beautiful voice ~ from explore.org

http://explore.org/#!/videos/player/belugas-power-of-the-sea

Crowning the top of the world, the frozen Arctic Ocean provides an unlikely home for a spectrum of enchanting creatures. Above the ice and below, beluga whales, narwhals, bowhead whales, walruses, and murres prosper ~ from nationalgeographic.com.

Lyn Jarvis, contributing editor of Across the Fence, travels to Punta Arenas Chile and then to beautiful Antarctica and presents two videos of his amazing journey.

“If Antarctica were music it would be Mozart; art and it would be Michael Angelo; literature and it would be Shakespeare and yet it is something greater ~ the only place on earth that is still as it should be ~ may we never tame it…”

Lyn Jarvis travels to Antarctica ~ among the highlights; penguins, seals, humpback whales, and a rolling iceberg!

These videos are so refreshing and cooling for me ~ hope they cooled you off as well. 

NOWHEREISLAND PART 3 – VIDEO AND UPDATE

CULTURAL OLYMPIAD ARCTIC ART PROJECT

You might like to review my 2 previous WordPress blogs on this subject before you enjoy this post – expecially the video!: “Nowhereisland …Just In Time For The Olympics (Part 1)”, published Feb. 27/12; and “Nowhereisland (Part 2) – About The Project”, published Mar. 5/12.  Thank you.

The creative idea itself is actually rather captivating: find an Arctic island that has recently been exposed by melting ice and then break off some rocks to form a new “island nation” which can then be transported to the waters off the UK in time for the 2012 Olympics. During its conception, Hartley billed it as a “travelling embassy” intended to highlight issues such as climate change and land ownership. Here’s how Alex Hartley’s website explains it:

In 2004, artist Alex Hartley discovered an island in the High Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, whilst on the Cape Farewell expedition. The island revealed itself from within the melting ice of a retreating glacier and Alex was the first human to ever stand on it and with the help of the Norwegian Polar Institute, the island, named Nyskjaeret, is now officially recognised and included on all maps and charts subsequent to its discovery. In September 2011, Alex returns to the Arctic to retrieve the island territory. Once in international waters, Alex will declare Nowhereisland a new nation.

Nowhereisland is one of 12 “Artist Taking the Lead” projects commissioned for the Culture Olympiad next year.

…The Guardian Environment Blog, Sept. 22, 2011

An Arctic island travels south. Nowhereisland will arrive off the coast of Weymouth for the opening of the Olympic sailing events and, hosted as a visiting island nation, the island will make a 500-mile journey around the south-west coast. An art project by Alex Hartley, produced by Situations at the University of the West of England.

Link to Video –

http://vimeo.com/23107392

A short film about Nowhereisland

This has footage from the 2011 Arctic expedition and you’ll hear from Alex Hartley and Claire Doherty, Director of Situations, who are the producers of Nowhereisland.

NOWHEREISLAND (PART 2) – ABOUT THE PROJECT

Nowhereisland is a public art project conceived by artist Alex Hartley.

It is one of 12 arts projects across the UK, funded by the Arts Council of England, which will form part of the Cultural Olympiad in summer 2012.

Imagine an Arctic island travelling south – a landscape on the move. After leaving the Kingdom of Norway, the island enters international waters and is declared a new island nation – Nowhereisland. This new nation continues its journey to the south west coast of England, where it opens its embassy and participates in the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad.

This is the idea of Alex Hartley, an artist known for his photographic and sculptural depictions of remote landscapes. Alex’s proposal, made for the Cultural Olympiad, is on an epic scale and reflects the ambition and endeavor of the Olympic spirit.

 http://nowhereisland.org/about/

Furzy Cliff in Weymouth is the site of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic sailing events. On the 25th July 2012  Nowhereisland will be floating off-shore, accompanied by its land based Embassy and where it will begin a six-week journey around the south west coast of England, finishing in Bristol on the 9th September 2012.

This idea began back in 2004, when, Alex visited the High Arctic with the climate change organization, Cape Farewell. The artist explored the northernmost polar landmass – a landscape shaped by the rapidly receding ice cap and marked by a human history of prospecting and exploration. Here explorers have attempted extraordinary feats of endurance and many have failed. This is a place over which nations have fiercely debated their territorial and mining rights and an area to which migrants have flocked in search of a place to belong. And it is here that Alex Hartley discovered a new island.

In the autumn of 2011, he returned to the Arctic and with the permission of the Norwegian government, sailed a portion of this island territory north beyond the jurisdiction of the Kingdom of Norway.

Just above the 80th parallel, the territory reached international waters, where it was declared a new island nation – Nowhereisland. Joining Alex on the expedition were a team of young people and specialists in international law, environmental and political campaigning, human migration, anthropology and psychology, who worked together to produce a programme of ideas and resources to be used in the year-long schools and education programme

Nowhereisland has already come to represent the possibilities for thinking about our values and beliefs as citizens. 52 Resident Thinkers from around the world are contributing to a year-long programme of Letters to Nowhereisland. Over 4000 people have already signed up to become citizens of Nowhereisland and will begin collectively writing the island’s constitution from January 2012.

This is a real place on the move. But it belongs to nowhere. It is an island nation that has come from a place that is deeply implicated by global decisions. It offers us the chance to reflect on where we belong and what nationhood means, and, in a time of global crisis, it opens up an opportunity to debate and consider important global questions that affect us all.

Above all, it allows us to reflect on Alex Hartley’s original question – if we were to create a new nation, how might we begin?

The Nowhereisland programme is already in full swing. We are working with 20 community organisations in seven towns and cities across south west England to shape the host programme of events and activities set to reach 250,000 people. Schools are using Nowhereisland as a catalyst for teaching on citizenship, geography and politics over the next 12 months and 52 thinkers across the globe are sitting down to compose their Letters to Nowhereisland.

The Nowhereisland Embassy will exist in two forms – online and as a mobile museum accompanying Nowhereisland’s sea journey on land. The Embassy will be packed full of information and activities about the many different ideas inspired by the project from the origins of the island in the Arctic, to nationhood, citizenship, land grab, cllimate change and hospitality. The mobile museum will be staffed and parked up at a vantage point for Nowhereisland so that anyone can find out more, ask questions and get involved in activities. It will also be the site for events such as welcome ceremonies, expert talks and workshops.

For more information, on the project, check out the FAQs:

http://nowhereisland.org/about/#!/about/frequently-asked-questions/

NOWHEREISLAND IS A NEW NATION ON A NEWLY DISCOVERED ISLAND, JUST FOR THE OLYMPICS (PART 1)

London’s 2012 Olympics have an artistic component and NowhereIsland has to be the most cerebral of all the projects.

PART 1 OF 2 BLOGS

Nowhereisland is an island which will be towed 500 miles from the high Arctic to the south coast of England. It was discovered by Alex Hartley, a British artist, when he visited there with the Cape Farewell project in 2004. The island had been revealed due to the melting ice of a retreating glacier. He was the first person to ever stand on it.

Hartley has created a floating sculpture/island out of the stones and earth and matter collected from the island.

http://www.treehugger.com/culture/nowhere-island-new-nation-newly-discovered-island-just-olympics.html

How does this work?

In September, aboard the good ship Noorderlicht, an expedition consisting of a team of young people and specialists in international law, environmental and political campaigning, human migration, anthropology and psychology went back to the island. With the permission of the Norwegian government, they removed material from the island territory, sailing it into international waters, where it was declared a new nation before travelling south to England.

With the help of the Norwegian Polar Institute, this new land was registered on all subsequent maps and charts and it was declared to be a new nation: Nowhereisland.

The island measures 40 by 8 metres and will arrive in Weymouth, UK in time for the opening of the sailing competitions of the Olympics on July 25, 2012. It is being constructed in the UK so that it can withstand the winds. Everything that you see when viewing the island will have come from the Arctic.

The new country will travel around the coast of England for six weeks, hitting 6 port towns and cities. It will end up in Bristol on September 8, 2012 for the final weekend of the Paralympic Games.

Who can Join?

Nowhereisland now has 4,640 citizens (you can become one) and its own constitution which is being developed. It “seeks to redefine what a nation can be. Nowhereisland embodies the global potential of a new borderless nation, which offers citizenship to all; a space in which all are welcome and in which all have the right to be heard. Nowhereisland’s constitution is and will be cumulative and consensual, open to all citizens and subject to change during the nation’s lifetime.”

Through this project the artist is trying to create a forum for thinking about our values and beliefs as citizens. The question Hartley is trying to make people think about is “If we were to create a new nation, how might we begin?”

A year-long programme of debates, discussions and activities is already taking place. Every week an eminent thinker is contributing a ‘Letters to Nowhereisland’ online. These Thinkers are drawn from different fields: environmentalism, peace, broadcasting, comedy. They include people such as Tim Smit (Eden Project), Vidal Sassoon, Yoko Ono, and Tania Kovats.

  Nowhereisland project, FAQs, be a citizen, to follow in BLOG 2