Tag Archives: Bolivia

WORLD’S UGLIEST ANIMAL CONTEST

 Which would you choose??? 

The blobfish, the pig-nosed turtle or the proboscis monkey: Which of these is the world’s ugliest animal?

WORLD'S UGLIEST ANIMALS

YouTube video, “Blobfish wins ugliest animal vote”, published on Sep 13, 2013 ~ The grumpy-looking, gelatinous blobfish has won a public vote to become the official mascot of the Ugly Animal Preservation Society.

The Ugly Animal Preservation Society has launched campaign to find the ugliest.  Celebrities including Stephen Fry and Simon Pegg have given support.  The project hopes to encourage young people to get involved in conservation projects, and to raise the profile of some of the world’s least cutesy animals, ‘challenging our love-affair with the poster-boys of conservation like the panda and the red squirrel’.
BLOBFISHBLOBFISH No beauty: The blobfish, which inhabits the deep waters off the coasts of the Australia and Tasmania, is one of a list of unusual creatures the Ugly Animal Preservation Society hopes to help save from extinction. The blobfish lives at depths between 600 and 1,200 metres where the pressure is several dozen times higher than at sea level. Its gelatinous appearance aids it buoyancy, as it spends its life gently bobbing around the deep sea. Although they are inedible, the blobfish suffers a significant threat from fishing trawlers, hunting the crabs and lobsters living at the same depth.

AXOLOTLAXOLOTL: This freaky cross between Peter Pan and the Xmen, is endangered because of urbanisation in Mexico City and polluted waters. The best-known of the Mexican neotenic mole salamanders belonging to the Tiger Salamander complex. Larvae of this species fail to undergo metamorphosis, so the adults remain aquatic and gilled. The axolotl is a type of salamander, which remain aquatic for their entire life, and has the amazing ability to regenerate lost limbs. This freaky cross between Peter Pan and the Xmen, is endangered because of urbanisation in Mexico City and polluted waters.

SLUGDROMEDARY JUMPING SLUG: The dromedary jumping slug wriggles its way out of danger, avoiding predators with a quick flick. It’s part of the Aronidae family and lives mainly in the Americas. The dromedary jumping slug wriggles its way out of danger, avoiding predators with a quick flick. It’s part of the Aronidae family and lives mainly in the Americas. Tom Toal (comedian and actor) thinks the slug deserves far more recognition than it currently gets… ‘It’s a slug, with a hump on its back, that can jump! Where’s its Disney movie?? You’ve got the Hunchback of Notre Dame… where’s the dromedary jumping slug and the princess?’

TURTLEPIG-NOSED TURTLE: The most unique feature of the animal is the elongated, pig-like snout, which acts like a snorkel, allowing the turtle to breathe while the rest of the body remains underwater. The pig-nosed turtle is the sole surviving member of an ancient and once widespread family of animals. The most unique feature is the elongated, pig-like snout, which acts like a snorkel, allowing the turtle to breathe while the rest of the body remains underwater (perhaps so it never has to show the world its ugly face?).

EELEuropean eels: Young eels are pictured in a basket at the Rhine river in Woerth Am Rhein, Germany. A favourite cockney snack, the European eel is threatened by overfishing and environmental changes. Its unusual life cycle sees it change colour as it grows, from transparent to yellow to dark grey.

FROGTITICACA WATER FROG: aka the ‘scrotum frog’, which is only found in Lake Titicaca on the border of Peru and Bolivia. The largest truly aquatic frog, the Titicaca water frog is found only in Lake Titicaca in South America. Its Latin name literally translates as “aquatic scrotum” – the multiple folds in its skin enable it to breathe underwater without needing to surface for air. The Titicaca frog, also known as the ‘scrotum frog’, is found on the border of Peru and Bolivia. Locals make a frappe of the frog, which is considered an aphrodisiac, by cooking it and running it through a blender. Comedian Iszi Lawrence highlighted the critter’s inherent comedy value. “Scrotum frog, you heard me right, scrotum frog. Even better than being called scrotum frog, it lives in Lake Titicaca!”

Other entries (non amphibian) were:

British bat, great short-horned lizard, flightless Kakapo parrot, Proboscis monkey and pubic louse.

WORLD'S UGLIEST ANIMALS

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2402159/The-blobfish-pig-nosed-turtle-proboscis-monkey-Which-worlds-ugliest-animal.html#ixzz2ggCgQ95r

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Central American Water Resource Management Network (CARA)

CARA, founded in 1999, is a water resources training network funded primarily by CIDA (Canada‘s equivalent to USAID), the Canadian International Development Agency.  It is run by the Universities of Calgary and Waterloo, with the former the lead university. David Bethune is the coordinator. CARA is a water resource training network focusing on building local capacity to improve the management and protection of Central American water resources.  

The following excerpts are taken from a Water Canada’s September/October 2012 article,  “Making It Local.  The CARA program empowers students in Central america to manage groundwater resources in their own backyards.” by Kerry Freek and Brendan Mulligan.

Eighty-percent of Central America’s water supply comes from groundwater, and that includes some huge urban water supplies, says University of Calgary’s David Bethune. “With population growth, deforestation, and poverty, the stress on watersheds in central america is huge,” he says. “the natural water balance is being altered, and a reduced natural recharge is affecting the groundwater supply.”  For a region that relies so heavily upon threatened groundwater supplies, central america, like many developing countries, desperately lacks qualified individuals to make decisions about water use and management … With funding from Canada’s International Development Research Centre, Farvolden initiated a program to train future hydrogeologists at the University of Costa Rica.  In 1995, Bethune and Ryan travelled south to help begin the first project. In the first cycle, they had students from Colombia to Guatemala.  Soon, there was a strong consensus that other countries would like to have similar programs.  They continued the program in Guatemala, Nicaragua and, later, El Salvador, Honduras, and Bolivia. As the current project director for the Central American water resource management network (CARA), Bethune now manages the Canadian International development agency (CIDA) funded program that supports six master of science programs in Central America … Within a short period of time, the CARA programs are becoming self-sustaining.  That, says Bethune, is the key. “The intention is independence from Canadian support. the people managing and developing water supplies are from their own country.”  The program in Nicaragua has been particularly successful.  CIDA has rewarded the initiative with additional funding for a project titled community water management in Nicaragua and Central America, which Ryan is directing.  The two are also involved in Hydrogeologists Without Borders (HWB), an organization formed to provide further assistance to CARA students and other similar programs and NGOs.  HWB is currently funding five Central American master’s students in the field of hydrogeology in their own regions.