Tag Archives: Coral Reef Alliance

CORAL REEF ALLIANCE PHOTO CONTEST

Whether or not you are a photographer, I think you will be impressed with the mission of the Coral Reef Alliance non-profit organization and you will also appreciate seeing the stunning photography submitted by former contest winners.

If you think your photography can equal or surpass some of the amazing entries seen below then definitely you should be interested in submitting your ‘winning’ photo to the ongoing Coral Reef Alliance Photo Contest.

Originally founded in 1994 to galvanize the dive community for conservation, CORAL has grown from a small, grassroots alliance into the only international nonprofit organization that works exclusively to unite communities to protect our planet’s coral reefs. We provide tools, education, and inspiration to residents of coral reef destinations to support local projects that benefit both reefs and people. We currently work in Hawaii, Mexico, Honduras, Fiji, and Indonesia.

Enter your favorite coral reef photographs in CORAL’s ongoing E-Current Contest for a chance to win a copy of Reef ~ a gorgeous coffee table book featuring beautiful coral reef photographs.

NOVEMBER CONTEST DEADLINE: October 15, 2012

Each winning photograph will be featured in an edition of E-Current, CORAL’s free electronic newsletter. The names of winning photographers will also be posted on the CORAL website with their photographs, which will be available for download as desktop wallpaper. All entrants will receive a subscription to E-Current.

Some of my favorites are:

 Winner of the May 2011 E-Current Photo Contest: Mandarinfish (Synchiropus splendidus) in Laha, Ambon, Indonesia by Christopher J. Crowley

 Winner of the January 2009 E-Current Photo Contest: Southern stingray (Dasyatis americana), Grand Cayman Island, by Jeremy Ellis 

Winner of the May 2010 E-Current Photo Contest: Spine-Cheek Anemone fish (Premnas biaculeatus), Wakatobi, Indonesia, by Matt Grace

Links ~

Site for previous winning photographs ~ http://www.coral.org/wallpaper

Photo Contest .pdf document ~

http://www.coral.org/files/pdf/photo-contest-flier.pdf

Enter contest ~

http://www.coral.org/node/3965

We hope you enjoyed your visit with us today and if you are a photographer ~ we wish you the best of luck! 
Keep your comments coming ~ we love hearing from and learning about our readers.

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OMG!!! GREAT WHITE SHARK VERSUS SEA KAYAKER

Before we get to the “OMG” video of this blog I thought I’d share  some amazing background information, featured on the Discovery Chanel video uploaded to YouTube, on the great white shark –  length, weight, speed of travel, nature, favorite foods -“triple hot fudge ice-cream sundae with 3 cherries on top” (SAY WHAT??  I’m sure glad to hear that I taste like a lima bean!

The following is a YouTube video ‘Great White Shark’, uploaded by on Aug 30, 2007 – great white sharks leap out of the water in pursuit of their favorite food.

Breaching (fish and mammals jumping out of the water)

Cape Town, South Africa, “Great White Shark Jumping”.  A shark attacks a seal at Seal Island  – airborne shark jumps out off water 12′ – another YouTube video uploaded by on Sep 22, 2007.

In the past I’ve posted a few blogs concerning: The Great Barrier Reef; and Our Coral Reefs are in Crisis.  I have just learned about the very important role that great white sharks play in the life of the coral reefs.

Having received permission of the Coral Reef Alliance, I would like to share excerpts of their article, “CORAL Campaigns to Protect Sharks” (link provided at end of blog) with you:

Sharks are commonly misunderstood and widely feared. These remarkable animals, however, are incredibly important for overall ocean health and, in particular, for coral reefs.

Sharks are often “apex” or top predators, helping to regulate species abundance and diversity while maintaining balance throughout an ecosystem. Studies have shown that coral reef ecosystems with high numbers of apex predators tend to have greater biodiversity and higher densities of individual species.

The loss of apex predators in a reef ecosystem upsets the natural food web and changes the composition of the reef community, eventually leading to the decline of critical reef species like herbivorous fish. With fewer herbivores, algae can become overgrown, suffocating the reef and reducing the number of available niches for fish species. In addition to being important for overall ecosystem health, sharks are also valuable to the tourism industry and to the economic health of coral reef destinations.

Despite their ecologic and economic value, shark populations are declining at an alarming rate. Roughly thirty percent of shark species are threatened or nearly threatened with extinction, and the status of another roughly fifty percent is unclear due to insufficient data.

NOW WHAT YOU’VE WAITED FOR – THE “OMG’ PORTION of this blog – click on link below photo

“A fishing trip off the coast of Australia takes a frightening turn when a great white shark starts harassing a sea kayaker” Discovery Channel “Outdoor Thrills” – Untamed and uncut.

http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/outdoor-thrill-videos/

Link to the Coral Reef Alliance (a most worthy cause!) web site –

http://www.coral.org/sharks