Tag Archives: Eternally Pure Water Systems Inc

Israel..a water power.

Back in the 1930’s British economists put it out there that the Jewish and Palestinian area that is now Israel had enough water to support a maximum 2 million people. So how does an area that is 60% desert, with a population increase of 10x since 1948 become a water exporter. The have enough water to export water to the Palestinians and Jordan. As well ,Israel exports billions of dollars of peppers, tomatoes, melons and other water intensive produce.

How did Israel do this? Early leaders recognized the importance of water. Centralized water planning was instigated, water prices were real, regulators were appointed, the citizens were educated to conserve, they desalinated sea water, drip irrigation was instituted, and all sewage was treated and recycled for the crops.

…and so a water power was born.

Being in a relatively arid area help people in the area be aware of water issues going back a long way. In the Mishnaic and Talmudic periods water laws developed pertaining to the specific ownership of wells, rules regarding public water pipes, canals, and reservoirs. Rights of travelers to water holes was dealt with, pollution at water holes was not allowed, sewage must be kept away. It sounds like the people who live in the present day Israel were primed for centuries as to the crucial importance of water as a resource.

 

Against the odds, with a growing population, growing economy,and a drop in rainfall Israel has become a world leader in water management. Unlike some of their neighbors they do not have a water crisis.

 

Certainly there are concerns as most wells are used for drinking water and irrigation. There is a fear that as waste water is returned to the fields, over time it makes the earth salinated and causes a drop off in agriculture.

Nunavut get $230 million for upgrades.

To improve drinking water and waste water systems in Nunavut the Federal and Territorial  Governments  are investing $230 million. Nine projects across nineteen Nunavut communities will receive the funding to make upgrades to their water , waste water, and solid waste systems. 

The investments will be in green infrastructure, protecting the environment, supporting local economic opportunities, improving family income and quality of life for those living and working in the North. 

Federal officials will be going to Nunavut to establish the priorities with the various territorial and community leaders. In Arviat, Chesterfield Inlet, and Sanikiluak storage capacity, and enhancing water treatment and distribution are the main issues. Kugaaruk and Kimmirut require upgrades to the waste water system are required. Grise Fiord, Gjoa Haven, and Igloolik need  better waste management and recycling services. 

The federal gov’t is supplying $170 million and Nunavut $58 million.

 

6 Reasons To Drink Water

Drinking water is essential to your health. Water is a nutrient your body needs that is available in plain water or foods and fluids. Loss of fluids are occurring continuously through the day, from evaporation through the skin, breathing, urine or in your stool. These losses must be replaced daily to maintain good health.

Let’s take a look at 6 reasons to make sure you are drinking enough water.

1. Drinking water helps maintain the balance of bodily fluids. We are about 60% water and need this amount to function in an optimum fashion. Less and our bodily systems tells us we are thirsty. More and we need to urinate.

2.Water helps control calories. Substitute water for high calorie fluids.

3. Water helps energize muscles. When muscle cells don’t have enough fluid they do not perform as well.

4. Water helps skin look good. Dehydration makes your skin look dry and wrinkled. This can be avoided with proper hydration.

5. Water helps your kidneys. Kidneys cleanse and rid the body of toxins as long as your intake of water is adequate. If you are getting enough fluids your urine should be clear and free of odor.

6. Water helps to maintain normal bowel function. good hydration keeps thing running smoothly in your gastrointestinal track..and helps prevent constipation.

Bottled Water Now More Popular Than Soda

Out of the USA, we have it that water has overtaken pop in popularity, but some feel it is worth highlighting the hidden cost in terms of plastic bottles.

Bottled water consumption last year hit 39.3 gallons per person vs pop consumption of 38.5 gallons per person. This is the first time bottled water has beat out pop.

Consider that per capita consumption of pop drinks was over 50 gallons in the 1990’s and early 2000’s. Soda is still more expensive with sales of 39.5 billion vs 21.3 billion for water. The decline for pop sales has been on a steady decline since 2003.This comes with the highlighted concerns of sugary beverages and the links to obesity and diabetes. Scares from possible water contamination also helped bottled water sales.

As for the makers of Coke and Pepsi don’t be to worried as they are also owners of Dasani and Aquafina…two of the largest brands of bottled water. They are in the game.

 

 

Seal Finger?

We all saw that video of the young girl being dragged into the water by a seal. There is more to that story.

The family of the girl is speaking out for the first time. The girl is being treated for a related infection called “seal finger”.

The Vancouver Aquarium reached out to the family to get in touch with them. They had heard that the girl had an injured finger and realized she was in danger of a possible hazardous infection called seal finger.

 

Apparently a bite from a seal or sea lion is different from the bite of a terrestrial animal because it has a host of bacteria uncommon to land animals. Seal finger can be caused by a bacteria called” mycoplasma phocacerebrale which must be treated promptly with tetracycline antibiotics.

Seal finger can make an area swell up and make an area look like it is inflated. It tends to affect the hands because it is there that people who work with seals or sea lions tend to get nipped. you can also get it from cuts when you are working on seal meat. The infection is resistant to some antibiotics and so it is important that the right ones be used.

In the past sealers historically lost their fingers or even their hands to the infection. Today, with the right treatment this is not an issue.

 

Cape Town water shortage…

Here is some water news out of Cape Town , South Africa.

Water usage must come down immediately by 100 million litres per day. Dam storage levels are at 20.7%, with the last 10% not really usable…so really there is only 10.7% left. The city has a consumption target of 600 million litres per day, but is 93 million litres a day over that target.

On Monday the drought stricken Western Cape area was declared a disaster area by the Premier. Everyone is being asked to keep their water usage to 100 litres per day. Cape Town is experiencing the effects of climate change, with reduced rainfall and abnormal water patterns. No significant rainfall is expected in the next three weeks.

Since the implementation of the water restrictions Cape Town’s call centre and first line responders have been inundated with calls about water faults and leaks. 75 new staffers have been brought on to increase response time to the some 800 calls per day.

With the call to restrict water usage some people have already reduced their consumption to less than a third of what it used to be….while others have decided their needs are more important than everyone else’s.

Residents are encouraged to use water solely for cooking , drinking and washing, and only flush the toilet when necessary. Shorter showers are also encouraged. Don’t run the water to brush teeth, shave, and drink. Wait for a full load before doing laundry or the dishes.

Everyone is urged to check for leaks on their property. A leaky toilet wastes 2600 to 13,000 litres per month. A leaky tap between 400 and 2600 litres a month

Every single water user must get down to 100 litres per person per day. This is non negotiable.

So this is the state of affairs in that part of the world when it comes to water. As Ottawa recovers from an overflowing Ottawa River, another part of the world suffers from a drought.

Water in Italy

To help understand the water situation in Italy let’s begin in the Alps. Global warming effects precipitation in the Alps,as well as snow and rain , and the timing of the snow melt. An overall decrease in the snow pack has been observed in the 20th century at low and mid level ranges. Trends are less significant at the higher ranges. The changes affect stream flow in the mountains with a general trend toward an earlier snow melt.

With respect to water access Italians are pretty good with 100% of city dwellers and 97% of rural dwellers having access. 70% of the population has access to sanitation. Water is becoming a social and economic emergency in Apulia, Basilicata, Sicily , and Sardinia due to increasing demand and lack of management. Decreases in precipitation will make things worse , with  possibly a 25% increase in stress on the water supply this century.

The expected impact of climate change in southern Europe will be affecting the quantity, quality, and over all availability. This means more droughts can be expected. Also, it is noted the groundwater resources are dwindling , recharging in not happening to the degree it once did.

Southern Italy is having more trouble meeting demand. with droughts and increase in demand, especially from farms…irrigation becomes even more problematic. Economic damage to agriculture , especially in the Po Valley could become extensive.

So with respect to water stress in the coming years, Italy may face….

  1. an increase of stress on the water supply by 25% this century.
  2. socio-economic emergency in some specific areas.
  3. reduced water supplies affecting drinking water, irrigation in the Po Valley , and less water for power generation.
  4. increased soil dryness and drought.
  5. water quality depletion.
  6. conflicts over the multiple uses of water.
  7. navigation of lakes and rivers becomes more difficult due to lack of water.