Tag Archives: fresh water

World Water Week ~ Fun Water Facts

Image result for friday fun facts

PAISLEY SAND FILTERThe first municipal water filtration works opened in Paisley, Scotland in 1832.

 

CHLORINEMore than 79,000 tons of chlorine are used per year in the United States.

 

OCEAN WATEROf all the earth’s water, 97% is salt water found in oceans and seas. Only 1% of the earth’s water is available for drinking water. Two percent is currently frozen.

BODYAbout two thirds of the human body is water.
Some parts of the body contain more water than others.
For example,
70% of your skin is water.

 

PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIESPublic water suppliers process 38 billion gallons of water per day for domestic and public use.

A person can live more than a month without food, but only about a week, depending on conditions, without water.

Image result for 1 million miles of pipelines and aqueducts carry water in the United States and Canada.Approximately 1 million miles of pipelines and aqueducts carry water in the United States and Canada. That’s enough to circle the earth 40 times.

 

WATER WELL DRILLINGAbout 800,000 water wells are drilled each year in the United States for domestic, farming, commercial, and water testing purposes.

 

LAWNTypically, households consume at least 50% of their water by lawn watering.

 

TOILETInside, toilets use the most water,
with an average of 27 gallons
per person per day.

 

SAFE WATER ACTIn 1974, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act to ensure that drinking water is safe for human consumption. The Act requires public water systems to monitor and treat drinking water for safety.

PRIVATE WELLSMore than 13 million households get their water from their own private wells and are responsible for treating and pumping the water themselves.

 

TOXIC CHEMICAL IN WATER Industries released
197 million pounds
of toxic chemicals
into waterways in 1990.
PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES US AND CANADAThe average daily requirement for fresh water in the United States is about 40 billion gallons a day, with about 300 billion gallons used untreated for agriculture and commercial purposes.

INDOOR WATER USEEach person uses
about 100 gallons
of water a day at home.

 

SHOWERThe average five-minute shower takes between 15 to 25 gallons of water.

 

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDThere are more fun water facts to share

– check them out next Friday.

                            Have a great weekend everyone.

 

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WATER CRISIS! ~ TIME TO SAVE WATER!

 TIME TO SAVE WATER

PERCENTAlthough our earth is made of 20% land and 80% water, 97% of the water is salt water and only 3% of the water is fresh waterHowever, 3% of water contains 2% frozen water, which means there is only 1% of the water we can use.     

CRISISWater crisis is becoming a more serious now. 36% of the world’s population lacks access to improved sanitation. 780 million people live without access to save drinking water.

SAFE WATER TO CROPMortality rates remain high without fresh, potable drinking water.

SANITATIONEach year 3.6 million people die from water related disease. It’s time to save water now.

UNESCO2UNESCO has predicted that by 2020 water shortage will be a serious worldwide problem.”

Let us take the global picture into account. As per a recent study, by the year 2020 water shortage will be a serious worldwide problem. Our water resources will not be sufficient anymore.

SAVE WATER2So an environmental approach is not only a good thing, it is necessary if we want our children to have water when they grow up.

What can we do? In fact, we can do more things to protect our planet.

CHART

Now here’s a topic that should be generating great interest around the globe – something not just to think about, but rather put into action.  In Spain they are definitely working in the right direction – stop the devastating loss of water. As an example, the image below shows the water loss in the Aral Sea over only a 50 year time frame.  This is alarming!

ARAL SEA

Utilizing a greywater system – eco friendly water conservation and solutions.  Greywater systems can help you save 35% to 40% on your annual water bill, and while saving money, you will also help save the environment and provide a better future for our children and their children to come. With this amount of savings, your Greywater Recycling System pays for itself.

http://www.lambourneproperties.com/eco_friendly_grey_water.php

 Eternally Pure –  Water Systems
5450 Canotek Road, Unit 66-67
Ottawa, Ontario K1J 9G5
613-742-0058

IMG_0212

http://visual.ly/it%E2%80%99s-time-save-water-now

UNITED STATES CLEAN WATER ACT TURNS 40

 

October 18th marks the 40th anniversary of the United States Clean Water Act.

What Is the Clean Water Act?
Here’s a look at what the Clean Water Act is and how this legislation is intended to address water pollution.

Answer: The Clean Water Act or CWA is the primary legislation in the United States that addresses water pollution. The goal of the Clean Water Act is to limit the release of high volumes of toxic chemicals into the nation’s water and ensure that surface waters met standards for sports and recreational use.The present legislation is based on the Federal Water Pollution Control Amendments of 1972. Significant amendments were added in the Clean Water Act of 1977 and the Water Quality Act of 1987.

The following excerpts are from “A Bolder Clean Water Act for the Next 40 Years“, posted by Sandra Postel of National Geographic’s Freshwater Initiative in Water Currents on October 17, 2012.
We recommend you read the full article at: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2012/10/17/a-bolder-clean-water-act-for-the-next-40-years/

…As game-changing laws go, the 1972 U.S. Clean Water Act ranks high. With images of rivers like the Cuyahoga burning and fish floating belly up in Lake Erie still fresh in the public’s mind, the Act transformed the nation’s relationship with fresh water.  It forbade cities and industries from using rivers and lakes as waste receptacles… The Act also set an ambitious goal: by 1985 the nation’s waters should be “fishable and swimmable.”  Although we missed that deadline, we are two-thirds of the way to achieving that goal… This year, as we celebrate the Act’s 40th anniversary, we can take pride in its accomplishments.  But after four decades, the Act needs to be given new teeth and updated tools, both to meet its original goals as well as to address new water challenges that have emerged since its passage.”


Development of the EPA, uploaded by on Feb 5, 2010

The following YouTube video, “Clean Water Act turns 40” is 1&1/4 hours in length. From the National Press Club in Washington, DC during May 2012 ~ Published on May 31, 2012 by

FUN WATER FACTS

1. The first municipal water filtration works opened in Paisley, Scotland in 1832.
2. More than 79,000 tons of chlorine are used per year in the United States and Canada to treat water.
3. Of all the earth’s water, 97% is salt water found in oceans and seas.
4. Only 1% of the earth’s water is available for drinking water. Two percent is currently frozen.
5. About two thirds of the human body is water. Some parts of the body contain more water than others. For example, 70% of your skin is water.
6. There are more than 56,000 community water systems providing water to the public in the United States.
7. Public water suppliers process 38 billion gallons of water per day for domestic and public use.
8. Approximately 1 million miles of pipelines and aqueducts carry water in the United States and Canada. That’s enough to circle the earth 40 times.
9. About 800,000 water wells are drilled each year in the United States for domestic, farming, commercial, and water testing purposes.
10. Typically, households consume at least 50% of their water by lawn watering. Inside, toilets use the most water, with an average of 27 gallons per person per day.
11. In 1974, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act to ensure that drinking water is safe for human consumption. The Act requires public water systems to monitor and treat drinking water for safety.
12. More than 13 million households get their water from their own private wells and are responsible for treating and pumping the water themselves.
13. Industries released 197 million pounds of toxic chemicals into waterways in 1990.
14. The average daily requirement for fresh water in the United States is about 40 billion gallons a day, with about 300 billion gallons used untreated for agriculture and commercial purposes.
15. You can survive about a month without food, but only 5 to 7 days without water.
16. Each person uses about 100 gallons of water a day at home.
17. The average five-minute shower takes between 15 to 25 gallons of water.
18. You can refill an 8 oz glass of water approximately 15,000 times for the same cost as a six-pack of soda.
19. An automatic dishwasher uses approximately 9 to 12 gallons of water while hand washing dishes can use up to 20 gallons.
20. If every household in America had a faucet that dripped once each second, 928 million gallons of water a day would leak away.
21. A dairy cow must drink four gallons of water to produce one gallon of milk.
22. One gallon of water weighs approximately 8½ pounds.
23. One inch of rainfall drops 7,000 gallons, or nearly 30 tons of water, on a 60′ x 180′ piece of land.
24. 300 million gallons of water are needed to produce a single day’s supply of U.S. newsprint.
25. A person should consume 2½ quarts of water per day (from all sources of water, food, etc.) to maintain health.
26. A person can live more than a month without food, but only about a week, depending on conditions, without water.
27. 65% of the human body is water, 75% of the human brain is water.
28. 75% of a chicken, 80% of a pineapple, and 95% of a tomato is water.
29. The first water pipes in the U.S. were made of hollowed-out logs.
30. 352 days – record of consecutive days with no measurable precipitation in Sentinel, AZ (Feb 1901 – Jan 1902).
31. The world’s rainiest place is Mt. Wai’ale’ale, Kauai, Hawaii. During an average year, there are only 15 dry days.
32. The water in Lake Tahoe could cover a flat area the size of California 14 inches deep. This amount of water is enough to supply everyone in the U.S. with 50 gallons of water/day for 5 years.
33. Nevada is the driest state in the nation with an average annual rainfall of only about 7 inches

COULD TAP WATER CAUSE LOU GEHRIG’S DISEASE?

from Water Online, January 18, 2012, By Kevin Westerling, Web Editor

http://www.wateronline.com/article.mvc/Could-Tap-Water-Cause-Lou-Gehrigs-Disease-0001?sectionCode=TOC&templateCode=EnhancedStandard&user=2702840&source=nl:32982

In what could be a life-saving discovery, a toxic molecule sometimes found in drinking water has been linked to the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s.

As reported by Miller-McClune, botanist Paul Cox and biologist Sandra Banack have spearheaded a consortium of scientists in researching the effects of the toxic molecule beta-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) present in cyanobacteria, which blooms in water and is often referred to as blue-green algae (though, scientifically speaking, it bears no relation to algae). Their studies indicate that as the consumption of BMAA increases in humans, so does the incidence of ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

ALS has been the focus of the researchers because of its severe nature — victims are paralyzed and typically die within five years — and the ability to accurately diagnose the disease in living patients. However, the findings also link BMAA concentrations to increased incidence of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. Like ALS, they have no known causes and no cure.

The work of Banack, Cox, and their team first met with resistance from the scientific community, in part because funding and research has focused on genetics as the cause of these neurodegenerative diseases, and also due to the fact that BMAA is not one of the 20 “building block” amino acids that make up proteins in all living organisms. Additional research, however, showed how BMAA could accumulate in nerve cells, giving scientific credibility to the hypothesis.

One study, by neurologist Elijah Stommel of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, found that the rate of ALS doubles around lakes reported to have cyanobacterial blooms throughout New England, and he is building a database of ALS cases in the northeastern United States. There and elsewhere, sources of exposure to BMAA include direct drinking water, food (especially shellfish), or swimming in contaminated water.

According to the Miller-McClune article, no water treatment plants in the United States are known to test for BMAA. Standard water treatment methods such as sand filtration, powdered activated carbon, and chlorination have proven effective in removing the toxin, but flocculation was deemed less effective. Cox has lobbied for more BMAA monitoring, and the Institute for EthnoMedicine — which he cofounded with Banack in 2004 — has developed a dipstick-type water test to do so, as well as filter technology to remove the compound.

“People need to be very careful about the water they’re drinking,” the article quoted Cox. “At this point we suspect there may be a tie between cyanobacterial toxins and your risk of progressive neurodegenerative disease — but it’s still a hypothesis.”

If Cox and his colleagues are right, it would provide tremendous encouragement to the scores of people affected by these devastating illnesses. In fact, Phase II clinical studies are underway for a drug that could potentially remove BMAA from the body and slow the progression of ALS, which is diagnosed in around 5,600 Americans each year.

Needless to say, he has a lot of people rooting for him.

Comments

Scary stuff!!! This is why more and more people do not rely on city water. RainSoft Reverse Osmosis is the answer for our customers.

TELL JAPAN: NO FUKUSHIMA DISASTER FUNDS FOR BRUTAL WHALE SLAUGHTER!

WE HAVE TO DO OUT PART – THIS IS UNCONSCIONABLE!!!

Tell Japan: no #Fukushima disaster funds for brutal whale slaughter! Sign @Avaaz petition here: http://www.avaaz.org/en/japan_disaster_funds_whaling_d/?wdGJicb

SHOW YOUR HOLIDAY SPIRIT – PROTECT THE BOREAL CARIBOU!

SHOW YOUR HOLIDAY SPIRIT – PROTECT THE BOREAL CARIBOU!

 http://action.davidsuzuki.org/save-caribou

Photo credit: Mike Jones via Flickr.

It’s that time of year again – when everyone’s thoughts turn to the jolly old elf and his eight trusty reindeer. But what about the reindeer’s cousin, the boreal caribou? It’s time we thought about them too!

The boreal caribou are in serious trouble. As industrial operations like oil and gas extraction and timber harvesting activities expand and move farther north, they are fragmenting caribou habitat and driving the animals towards extinction.

The federal government’s new draft caribou recovery strategy is, on many fronts, a huge disappointment. Instead of protecting habitat, they want to allow business as usual in places like Alberta’s tarsands, “stabilizing” herd populations by killing predators like wolves while allowing for further habitat destruction. A plan like this will surely land the government on Santa’s naughty list.

While we continue to work with forestry companies through the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement to ensure caribou survival and forest sector competitiveness, the feds need to know that they will be getting a lump of coal in their stockings if they don’t strengthen their Strategy.

But it’s not too late to let them know what you think of the plan. Until February 22nd, 2012, they’re accepting comments on their recovery strategy. We’re telling them that we want a strong recovery plan based on sound science rather than politics.

Tell the government you care about caribou by sending the email below. Santa will love you for it.

4,481 messages have been sent. Let’s get to 5,000!