Tag Archives: Gallon

WATER CONSERVATION TIPS

    WATER CONSERVATION

I am reblogging the following National Geographic article, ‘Water Conservation Tips’, and the link may be found at the end of the article.  Please read the full article as I am certain that you will find many new suggestions for conserving water in and around your home.

TOILETS, TAPS, LAUNDRY, SHOWERS AND DISHES
•1994 was the year that federally mandated low-flow shower heads, faucets, and toilets started to appear on the scene in significant numbers.
•On average, 10 gallons per day of your water footprint (or 14% of your indoor use) is lost to leaks. Short of installing new water-efficient fixtures, one of the easiest, most effective ways to cut your footprint is by repairing leaky faucets and toilets.
SHOWERHEAD•If you use a low-flow shower head, you can save 15 gallons of water during a 10-minute shower.
HOT WATER TANK•Every time you shave minutes off your use of hot water, you also save energy and keep dollars in your pocket.
running bath water•It takes about 70 gallons of water to fill a bathtub, so showers are generally the more water-efficient way to bathe.
TOILET•All of those flushes can add up to nearly 20 gallons a day down the toilet. If you still have a standard toilet, which uses close to 3.5 gallons a flush, you can save by retrofitting or filling your tank with something that will displace some of that water, such as a brick.
washing machine•Most front-loading machines are energy and water-efficient, using just over 20 gallons a load, while most top-loading machines, unless they are energy-efficient, use 40 gallons per load.
•Nearly 22% of indoor home water use comes from doing laundry. Save water by making sure to adjust the settings on your machine to the proper load size.
DISHWASHER•Dishwashing is a relatively small part of your water footprint—less than 2% of indoor use—but there are always ways to conserve. Using a machine is actually more water efficient than hand washing, especially if you run full loads.
ENERGY STAR SYMBOL•Energy Star dishwashers use about 4 gallons of water per load, and even standard machines use only about 6 gallons.
•Hand washing generally uses about 20 gallons of water each time.

FOOTPRINTYARDS AND POOLS
•Nearly 60% of a person’s household water footprint can go toward lawn and garden maintenance.
LAWN•Climate counts—where you live plays a role in how much water you use, especially when it comes to tending to a yard.
SWIMMING POOL•The average pool takes 22,000 gallons of water to fill, and if you don’t cover it, hundreds of gallons of water per month can be lost due to evaporation.

DIET
WATER USED IN FOOD•The water it takes to produce the average American diet alone—approximately 1,000 gallons per person per day—is more than the global average water footprint of 900 gallons per person per day for diet, household use, transportation, energy, and the consumption of material goods.
QUARTER POUNDER•That quarter pounder is worth more than 30 average American showers. One of the easiest ways to slim your water footprint is to eat less meat and dairy. Another way is to choose grass-fed, rather than grain-fed, since it can take a lot of water to grow corn and other feed crops.
POULTRY•A serving of poultry costs about 90 gallons of water to produce. There are also water costs embedded in the transportation of food (gasoline costs water to make). So, consider how far your food has to travel, and buy local to cut your water footprint.
PORK•Pork costs water to produce, and traditional pork production—to make your sausage, bacon, and chops—has also been the cause of some water pollution, as pig waste runs into local water sources.
•On average, a vegan, a person who doesn’t eat meat or dairy, indirectly consumes nearly 600 gallons of water per day less than a person who eats the average American diet.
COFFEE•A cup of coffee takes 55 gallons of water to make, with most of that H2O used to grow the coffee beans.

ELECTRICITY, FUEL ECONOMY, AND AIRLINE TRAVEL
ELECTRICITY•The water footprint of your per-day electricity use is based on state averages. If you use alternative energies such as wind and solar, your footprint could be less. (The use of biofuels, however, if they are heavily irrigated, could be another story.) You would also get points, or a footprint reduction, for using energy-star appliances and taking other energy-efficiency measures.
WASH CAR•Washing a car uses about 150 gallons of water, so by washing less frequently you can cut back your water use.
GAS•A gallon of gasoline takes nearly 13 gallons of water to produce. Combine your errands, carpool to work, or take public transportation to reduce both your energy and water use.
FLYING•Flying from Los Angeles to San Francisco, about 700 miles round-trip, could cost you more than 9,000 gallons of water, or enough for almost 2,000 average dishwasher loads.
•A cross-country airplane trip (about 6,000 miles) could be worth more than 1,700 standard toilet flushes.
•Traveling from Chicago to Istanbul is just about 10,000 miles round trip, costing enough water to run electricity in the average American home for one person for more than five years.

INDUSTRY—APPAREL, HOME FURNISHINGS, ELECTRONICS, AND PAPER
•According to recent reports, nearly 5% of all U.S. water withdrawals are used to fuel industry and the production of many of the material goods we stock up on weekly, monthly, and yearly.
COTTON TEE SHIRT•It takes about 100 gallons of water to grow and process a single pound of cotton, and the average American goes through about 35 pounds of new cotton material each year. Do you really need that additional T-shirt?
RECYCLE•One of the best ways to conserve water is to buy recycled goods, and to recycle your stuff when you’re done with it. Or, stick to buying only what you really need.
LAPTOP•The water required to create your laptop could wash nearly 70 loads of laundry in a standard machine.
PAPER•Recycling a pound of paper, less than the weight of your average newspaper, saves about 3.5 gallons of water. Buying recycled paper products saves water too, as it takes about six gallons of water to produce a dollar worth of paper.

Link to article ~ http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/freshwater/water-conservation-tips/

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WATER ~ NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION ~ YES!!!

WATER WEIGHT LOSS

Is losing weight one of your 2013 New Year’s resolutions?

Perhaps the following article, The Water Weight Loss Cure from Care2, posted by Annie B. Bond, September 2005 will help.

Water can be one of your best friends during a weight loss regime. Although beauty is largely a matter of inner radiance, physical treatments can help keep us feeling and looking our best. Water remedies can be quite effective in maintaining the figure and skin in particular.

WATER WEIGHT LOSS7
Weight gain from overeating can cause unflattering changes to the figure, but it can be fought with a water remedy. By drinking generous amounts of water (more than a half-gallon (or 2 liters) a day, you can reduce the amount of food consumed and also eliminate false hunger pains.

Furthermore, good hydration of the tissues encourages enzymatic activity and therefore the burning of fat deposits. To lose weight drink 2.5 to 3.5 liters a day, on the higher side the more you weigh and eat.

WATER WEIGHT LOSS10Water is an essential ingredient for skin regeneration. The skin of a 130-pound individual contains around 2 gallons of water, and the skin of a 160-pound individual contains almost 2.5 gallons of water. This water is retained by special molecules capable of holding in place a thousand times their weight of the skin and the loss of a fresh youthful appearance. When the skin lacks water, it becomes dull, dry, and wrinkled and loses its elasticity, firmness, and color, and glands eliminate toxins poorly and become congested causing skin problems. Hydrating skin properly by drinking enough prevents these assaults on the skin. To maintain youthful skin, around 2.5 liters of water a day should be sufficient.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/the-water-weight-loss-cure.html#ixzz2INoHuXbV

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WALKING WATER: H20 AND THE HUMAN BODY

Posted by Brian Richter of The Nature Conservancy and University of Virginia in Water Currents on March 6, 2012

Fourteen gallons of water.

That’s how much water I’m walking around with in my body mass.  Imagine carrying 120 pounds of water –that’s three nearly full 5-gallon water jugs — around with you all day long, every day of the year.

No wonder I’m so tired at the end of the day.

You can do this math for yourself.  An average adult’s body is 60-70% water; for children it’s closer to 75% but it can get as low as 45% if you’re overweight.

Take your body weight and multiply it by the appropriate percentage of water and you’ll see how many pounds of water you’re packing.  If you want to convert those pounds of water into gallons, just multiply by 8.4.

Add another 24 pounds of skin and what you’ve basically got is hundreds of thousands of years of human evolution producing an ambulatory water balloon wrapped in flesh.

University of Chicago scientist Neil Shubin writes in his book Inner Fish that we hiccup because of a design malfunction in our nervous system and a breathing apparatus passed down from fish and tadpoles.  It appears that when our animal ancestors crawled out of the ocean they somehow forgot to purge their water ballast as well.

Fortunately, we also have a three-pound brain that can tell our body balloon where to go.  How to fall in love.  How to launch fellow balloons into space.

Before your brilliant cerebral cortex starts thinking that dehydrating yourself would be a smart diet plan, I’ll caution you that our highly evolved body balloons run on a very thin tolerance for water loss.

During a normal day, we breathe, pee, and sweat out about three quarts of water, amounting to 5-10% of our body’s water. Note that if you’re running the 150-mile Marathon Des Sables across the Saharan Desert in Morocco, you’re likely leaking more than 12 quarts a day.  If you’re not continuously replenishing your body’s water you can run into trouble in a hurry.

With a deficit of as little as one quart you’re likely going to start losing some cognitive function, alertness, and ability to concentrate.  If you lose a gallon you’ll start feeling pretty lethargic, and you’ll likely have a bad headache.  If you’re down two gallons you’re going to be sick enough to be in the hospital.  Three gallons and you’re in the morgue.

Yet our water needs are so much greater than simply keeping our bodies hydrated, and therein lies the great water challenge of the 21st century.  We use water to grow our food, generate our electricity, and manufacture our clothes.  If you visit National Geographic’s Water Footprint Calculator you’ll see that it takes about 2,000 gallons of water per person each day to support an American lifestyle.  That places a lot of strain on the freshwater systems of our planet, a theme that I’ll return to repeatedly in the coming weeks and months in my Water Currents blogs.

Water is at the very core of our being.  John Muir once said, “The rivers flow not past, but through us.”

How right he was.

http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2012/03/06/human-body-water/