Tag Archives: India

WATER BROTHERS BACK FOR 2ND SEASON! – TVO

 WATER BROTHERS1

Beach brothers back in the water for second season on TVO

This article, by Jon Muldoon, appeared in Beach Metro Community News, September 10, 2013
 

Alex and Tyler Mifflin star in The Water Brothers, which launches its second season September 10 on TVO. Photo courtesy TVOAlex and Tyler Mifflin star in The Water Brothers, which launches its second season September 10 on TVO. Photo courtesy TVO

Beachers Alex and Tyler Mifflin care mostly about three things – one is oxygen, and the other two are hydrogen. The Water Brothers, as the siblings are more widely known, are proud to launch the second season of their eponymous television show tonight, Sept. 10, on TVO.
The brothers sat down last week to talk about all things wet and adventurous, including learning to sail large boats, travelling to the largest festival in the world, ever, in India, and of course focusing on problems in our own back yard, such as the lack of clean drinking water in northern First Nations communities, a national shame in a country blessed with as much fresh water as Canada.
“There’s a vastly disproportionate impact on First Nations,” said Tyler.
So why focus on water to begin with?
“Everything is interconnected through water,” said Alex.
Even though social, environmental, economic and political issues all tie in to clean water, “we don’t see the connections. It’s not always obvious to us,” said Tyler.
While the brothers are passionate about water issues, they realize that working in television, they need to keep their message entertaining, particularly to reach a younger audience. That’s where the travel and adventure comes into play.
INDIA FESTIVAL   In one episode, the brothers travel to India for the Kumbh Mela Festival on the Ganges River, one of the most celebrated yet polluted rivers in the world.
On the same trip they carried on to Bangladesh, which Alex says is “the canary in the coal mine in terms of climate change.”
PACIFIC GARBAGE PATCHOne adventure sees Alex and Tyler sailing to a remote area in the Pacific ocean, to visit “the great Pacific garbage patch.”
On a related recent trip in Lake Ontario, the boys travelled with a crew to measure the amount of plastic debris in their home waters.
PLASTIC BOTTLES“We don’t have the capacity to filter out small pieces of plastic in our wastewater stream,” said Tyler. “It’s being produced even faster than we can figure out where it’s going.”
Another episode involves farmed fish in British Columbia, which might also hit close to home, at least with Toronto seafood lovers.
“Salmon is such an iconic species in Canada, especially on the west coast. It’s a keystone species,” said Tyler.
AlexSALMON agrees, pointing out that what we eat in Ontario creates a measurable impact on water quality in western Canada.
“We aren’t necessarily directly connected to the ocean, but we make food choices every day which do connect us to the ocean,” he said.
Both brothers agree that presenting solutions is a key aspect to their show. From large scale changes to individual choices, Alex and Tyler always try to present viewers with tangible actions they can take to effect change.
Although the brothers are already in the early planning stages for season three, the current season is set to premiere on TVO tonight, Tuesday, Sept. 10, at 7:30 p.m. The episodes can also be streamed any time after broadcast at tvo.org and thewaterbrothers.ca.
QUENCH WATER FINDERAlex and Tyler are also working on redesigning and expanding Quench, their mobile app which offers users a map of the closest taps to fill up on clean water in the GTA, to help reduce reliance on plastic bottles. Quench can be downloaded for Android and iPhone.
Anyone interested in helping out directly alongside the Water Brothers can join Alex and Tyler, and many others, at Woodbine Beach on the morning of Saturday, Sept. 21 for the annual Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup.

http://www.beachmetro.com/2013/09/10/beachers-alex-tyler-mifflin-care-oxygen-hydrogen-water-brothers-siblings-widely-known-proud-launch-season-eponymous-television-show-tonight-sept-10-tvo-brothers-sat-week-talk-wet-adv/

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HOW EARTH MADE US – WATER ~ A MUST SEE VIDEO!!!

HOW EARTH MADE US_WATER

How Earth Made Us – The untold story of history.

This is part 2 in Professor Iain Stewart’s series, “How Earth Made Us”.  I highly recommend you take an hour to watch it as it is superlative!!!

Our planet has amazing power, and yet that’s rarely mentioned in our history books. This series tells the story of how the Earth has influenced human history, from the dawn of civilisation to the modern industrial age. It reveals for the first time on television how geology, geography and climate have been a far more powerful influence on the human story than has previously been acknowledged. A combination of epic story telling, visually stunning camerawork, extraordinary locations and passionate presenting combine to form a highly original version of human history.

Youtube video, “How Earth Made Us – Water”, uploaded on May 16, 2011 – Of all our planet’s forces perhaps none has greater power over us than water.  For me water is the most magical force on earth.  The presence of water shapes, renews and nourishes our planet.  It’s our planet’s life blood, that pumps through it continuously…

Water

This time he explores our complex relationship with water. Visiting spectacular locations in Iceland, the Middle East and India, Iain shows how control over water has been central to human existence. He takes a precarious flight in a motorised paraglider to experience the cycle of freshwater that we depend on, discovers how villagers in the foothills of the Himalayas have built a living bridge to cope with the monsoon, and visits Egypt to reveal the secret of the pharaohs’ success. Throughout history, success has depended on our ability to adapt to and control constantly shifting sources of water.

Discover why societies have succeeded or failed, and how the environment has influenced every aspect of our history from art to industry, religion to war, world domination or collapse. Visiting some of the most iconic places on Earth, How Earth Made Us overturns preconceptions about our civilisations and our cultures to offer a new perspective on who we are today.

~Youtube video presented by Professor Iain Stewart ~

Link to ~ How Earth Made Us—a masterly BBC documentary

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2012/04/eart-a21.html

 
Our heartfelt thanks to Professor Stewart
for his exceptional accomplishment!

HAVE YOU EVER SEEN THE RAIN?

Watching and listening to a summer’s gentle rainfall on the lake is so restorative.
Children around the world take great delight in splashing through puddles during a rainfall.
To many people rainfalls are uplifting, invigorating and soothing.

I uploaded the following video to YouTube on November 2, 2012 for this blog ~


There have been hundreds of popular songs written about the rain – for example: ‘Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head‘; ‘Dancing In the Rain’ and most recently “Have You Ever Seen The Rain?” performed by Phillip Phillips on American Idol.

 ~ Do you know how rain actually is formed? ~

The drops or ice crystals, in the form of cloud, become so heavy that the air cannot hold them up and they fall to the ground as rain… Since rain provides fresh water making the rivers flow, filling lakes and keeping plants alive, it is very significant. We cannot imagine our life without water ~ excerpt from The Benefits of Rain by Michael C Miller ~ http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Benefits-of-Rain&id=4795042

 ~ Interesting Cultural attitudes towards rain ~

Rain can bring joy, as some consider it to be soothing or enjoy the aesthetic appeal of it.
In dry places, such as India, or during periods of drought rain lifts people’s moods.
In temperate climates, people tend to be more stressed when the weather is unstable or cloudy.
In Botswana, the Setswana word for rain, “pula”, is used as the name of the national currency, in recognition of the economic importance of rain in this desert country
People find the scent during and immediately after rain pleasant or distinctive. The source of this scent is petrichor, an oil produced by plants, absorbed by rocks and soil, and later released into the air during rainfall –   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain

I know you’ll enjoy the following rendition of “Have You Ever Seen the Rain?”, performed by Phillip Phillips, American Idol’s 11th season finale winner this year.

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The following comments are from http://www.lacarte.org/songs/rain/

  Take along stroll down memory lane, no matter what your era or your preferred style of music, browsing almost 800 song titles relating to rain and rainy things, including over 50 named just ‘Rain.’ You will  probably be surprised how many of these songs from American popular culture you know.
.
This is not an attempt to catalog every possible song that merely happens to make a passing reference to rain, as so many do apparently because it’s the first thing the authors think of to rhyme with ‘pain.’ There are, in fact, according to off siteThe Muze (muze.com), over 5,000 albums containing at least one song with the word ‘rain’ in their title, just since 1960. The Virtual Flood, by contrast, hopes only to cover those songs which are likely to be known by wide audiences, and are significantly involved with rain, whether the word is in their title or not.

 

A MUST SEE! ~ STEPWELL IN RAJASTHAN, INDIA

CHAND BAORI STEPWELL ~ RAJASTHAN, INDIA

Stepwells, also called bawdi or baoli, are unique to India… and are often of architectural significance, just like Chand Baori.

Searching the web and YouTube I found numerous short videos of many different stepwells in India and chose this one as the photography seems to be the best:

Youtube video, “india, chand baori reservoir”, uploaded by  fluglehrer on Mar 25, 2008 ~ “gigantic sight ! a must!”


The following excerpts are taken from the article,  “Chand Baori Step Well in Rajasthan, India“, posted by MumbaiRock on October 16, 2012

Chand Baori in Abhaneri village in eastern Rajasthan, India, is one of the most overlooked landmarks in the country.  It is one of the oldest stepwells in Rajasthan… among the biggest in the  world… This incredible square structure is 13 stories deep, and lined along the walls on three sides are double flight of steps… Built during the 8th and 9th century by King Chanda of Nikumbha Dynasty, the well provided the surrounding areas with a  dependable water source for centuries before modern water delivery systems were introduced.  As the green water at the base attests, the well is no longer in use, but it makes for an interesting stop-over to an architecturally impressive structure that is over 1000 years old.  There’s also a temple adjoining the well for visitors to explore… The well’s sheer endlessly appearing geometric complexity made of stairs and steps ensured that Rajput people had access to water at any time of the year, and from all sides… The large mouth of the well functioned as a rain catching funnel that contributed to the water seeping in from the porous rock at the bottom… At the bottom the well the air is always about 5-6 degrees cooler than at the top.

The steps surround the well on three sides while the fourth side has a set of pavilions built one atop another.

The side that has the pavilions have niches with beautiful sculptures including religious carvings.  There is even a royal residence with rooms for the King and the Queen and a stage for the performing arts.

The well is now a treasure managed by the Archeological Survey of India.

http://www.mumbairock.com/profiles/blogs/chand-baori-step-well-in-rajasthan-india

AUSTRALIA ~ TO CREATE MARINE HAVEN ~ PART 2

In the following breathtaking video, “Australia Great Barrier Reef“, you get a glimpse into the magnitude of the thousands of species that inhabit Australia‘s surrounding ocean ~ Uploaded by on Oct 3, 2009; Music: Tiesto-A Tear in the Open, Chilling Crew-For Better Moments, Tribal Trance-Orance Leopard Moon. Quote from YouTube video information: “My intentions were to make a quality trip video. We took a 4 day liveaboard with Mike Ball Dive expeditions ending up at the amazing Osprey Reef. The diving was incredible.”
This is a truly spectacular video and a must see in FULL SCREEN.  I am so envious of the divers who experience this thrill of a lifetime!

Some interesting data about the species that inhabit the waters of Australia’s ocean and the Great Barrier Reef ~

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef in the world. It consists of more than 2,900 coral reefs, 600 continental islands, 300 coral cays and thousands of species making it one of the world’s most complex and diverse ecosystems. The animals of the Great Barrier Reef include some 1500 species of marine fish, 360 species of hard corals, between 5000 and 8000 species of mollusks, 600 species of echinoderms, 17 species of sea snakes, 1500 species of sponges, 30 species of whales and dolphins, 6 species of marine turtles, 22 species of seabirds and 32 species of shorebirds which breed on the reef’s many small islands.

Marine Fish of the Great Barrier Reef

There are more than 1500 species of fish that inhabit the Great Barrier Reef. They range in size from the tiny gobies, some of which weigh less than one gram, to the larger bony fishes such as the tuskfish and potato cod, to the massive cartilaginous fishes such as manta rays, tiger sharks and whale sharks. Damselfish, wrasses and tuskfish are among the most abundant fishes on the reef. Other fish of the Great Barrier Reef include blennies, butterfly fish, triggerfish, cowfish, pufferfish, angelfish, anemone fish, coral trout, seahorses, sea perch, sole, scorpion fish, hawkfish and surgeonfish.

Hard Corals of the Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is home to about 360 species of hard corals including bottlebrush coral, bubble coral, brain coral, mushroom coral, staghorn coral, tabletop coral and needle coral. Hard corals, also known as stony corals, are a group of marine animals that live in shallow tropical waters and are responsible for building the structure of a coral reef. Colonies of hard corals grow in various shapes and sizes such as mounds, plates and branches. As previous coral colonies die, new ones grow on top of the limestone skeletons of their predecessors. Over time, this growth creates the three-dimensional architecture of a coral reef. Colonies of hard corals consist of thousands of small individual invertebrates referred to as coral polyps. Each polyp is radially symmetrical with a tube-like body that has a tentacle-rimmed mouth at the tip that it uses to feed.

Sponges and Echinoderms of the Great Barrier Reef

Over 600 species of echinoderms and more than 1500 species of sponges inhabit the Great Barrier Reef.

Echinoderms are bottom-dwelling marine invertebrates. They exhibit a type of radial symmetry called pentamerous symmetry in which their body can be divided into five equal parts around a central axis. The echinoderms of the Great Barrier Reef include sea urchins, sea cucumbers, sea stars, feather stars and brittle stars.

Sponges of the Great Barrier Reef include the yellow burrowing sponge, tubular sponge, thick yellow fan sponge.

Marine Reptiles of the Great Barrier Reef

There are 23 species of marine reptiles that inhabit the Great Barrier Reef including 6 species of sea turtles and 17 species of sea snakes. Occasionally, the saltwater crocodile also ventures out to forage on the reef, although such visits are quite rare.

The sea turtles that inhabit the Great Barrier Reef include the green turtle, loggerhead turtle, hawksbill turtle, flatback turtle, leatherback turtle and the Pacific ridley turtle. Some sea turtle species, such as the green turtle, loggerhead turtle and hawksbill turtle, nest on coral cays. The flatback turtle nests on continental islands and the green and leatherback turtles nest on mainland Australia. When not nesting, these sea turtle species use the waters of the Great Barrier Reef as foraging grounds.

Among the sea snakes of the Great Barrier Reef are the olive sea snake, the turtle-headed sea snake and the sea krait. All sea snakes are venomous.

Marine Mammals of the Great Barrier Reef

About 30 species of whales and dolphins frequent the waters of the Great Barrier Reef including humpback whales, Irrawaddy river dolphins, minke whales and spinner dolphins. Dugongs also inhabit the reef, feeding on the sea grasses that grow in the shallow inshore waters.

Not all of these marine mammals are permanent residents of the Great Barrier Reef. Minke whales and humpback whales visit the reef in winter. Other rorqual whales such as blue whales, fin whales and sei whales also migrate through the Great Barrier Reef region but do not stay for extended periods of time.

Mollusks of the Great Barrier Reef

More than 5000 species of mollusks live in the Great Barrier Reef. These include giant clams, cone shells, nudibranchs, octopus, cuttlefish and squid.
 
 
 
 

In this video, “Australia to create marine haven”, Australia’s Environment Minister, Tony Burke, unveils plans for the world’s largest network of protective marine parks.  Published on Jun 14, 2012 by

 

VIDEO ~ “Australia to build biggest marine reserve“, posted to YouTube by Al Jazeera‘s Andrew Thomas from Sydney, Australia on Jun 15, 2012 ~ The Australian government has announced the creation of the world’s biggest network of marine parks (3.3 million square metres), covering an overall area the size of “India”

This video, “Marine Life off Perth, Western Australia”, just released by the Ocean’s Institute, University of  Western Australia, showing a sequence of video footage captured off Perth, Western Australia.  The marine life shown in this sequence now has a brighter future thanks to the plan for marine sanctuaries off Australia’s South West. Published on Jul 4, 2012 by

 Once again, I hope you all realize how vital the work being done by the World Resources Institute Insights is and will find a way to support their efforts ~ insights.wri.org. 

FIRST FRENCH “PEDAL POWERED” SUBMARINE: THREE VIDEOS

This is the first time I’ve tried adding a sound track to my blog and it works – thanks to soundcloud.com!  If you are enjoying the music you might like to read ‘my personal note to all my readers’ at the end of the blog before you watch the amazing videos – enjoy!

PEDAL POWERED SUBMARINE 

The world’s first pedal powered submarine, called, “The Scubster”, has been invented in France by Minh-Lôc Truong and Stéphane Rousson, a team of French designers and engineers.   The sub is powered by connecting a pedal belt to a twin-propeller system that can reach speeds of up to 8 km an hour (5 mph ). The Scubster can reach a depth of 6 meters (20 ft), ideal for peddling through rivers, and shallow ocean excursions.

france, pedal-powered submarine, submarine, yellow submarine, scubster, pedal-powered submarine, french pedal powered submarine, scubster pedal power, scubster french submarine

I have included three videos; “A Scubster Story”;  the under ice testing at Piau-Engaly in the Pyrenees mountains in France; and also one from the 2009 International Submarine Race in Bethesda, Maryland.

     Link to YouTube video, “A Scubster Story” –

      Link to Scubster web site –

http://www.scubster.org/eng-Home.html

      YouTube video of winter testing under ice at Piau-Engaly, France

      Link to YouTube video, 10th Biennial International Submarine Races, 2009 –

Personal note to all my readers –

After checking recent stats on our blog, I am absolutely blown away by the number of readers from around the globe who are sending best wishes and comments (which of course makes my work so much more rewarding).  Countries we’ve heard from so far (all 64 of them!) are listed below.  Rainsoft of Ottawa thanks everyone for your support and for showing your appreciation of my work ‘behind the scenes’. I hope to continue posting intriguing topics that pique your interest, inspirational posts for you to share, environmental concerns that will encourage you seek information from other sources and of course water related posts (conservation, environment, health, sports, marine biology, oceanography, etc.)  It’s also great to ‘tickle your funny bone’ with some of our “Fun Friday” posts from time to time.  Make sure to take time to check through our archives – many informative, enlightening, inspiring  and humourous articles await you…

      United States, Canada, India, Poland, United Kingdom, Australia, Philippines, Germany, Pakistan, South Africa, Lebanon, Dominica,  Costa Rica, Panama, Italy, Netherlands, Croatia, Denmark,  United Arab Emirates, Slovenia, Singapore, New Zealand, Republic of Korea, Hong Kong, Mexico, Greece, Bulgaria, Portugal, Albania, Venezuela, Czech Republic, Chile, Indonesia, Brazil, Turkey, Thailand, Bahamas,  Honduras, Trinidad and Tobago, Japan, Finland, Azerbaijan, Ukraine,  Belgium, Russian Federation, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Egypt, Ireland,  Peru,  Hungary, Switzerland, Malaysia, Bangladesh, Serbia, Norway,  Morocco,  Ghana, Colombia, Saudi Arabia, Macedonia, Cameroon,  Viet Nam,  Syrian Arab Republic, Ecuador.