Tag Archives: Israel

CELL PHONE SIGNALS ABSORBED BY WATER

DROPPED SIGNALS1

YouTube video experiments to explain cell phone signals absorbed by water and cell tower RF absorbed by water:

 

The following article, “Dropped Signals”,  is from WaterCanada’s March/April 2013 magazine issue.
What do phone calls have to do with raindrops?  Water absorbs cell phone signals.  RAINFALL ATTENUATESBased on that premise, a group of researchers in the Netherlands set out to see if cellular network data, collected over several days, could give an accurate estimate of how much rain fell in an area.  They found that data from the cell networks closely matched ground-based observations.
ATTENUATION BETWEEN CELL TOWERS“For a long time — decades, even from the sixties — we’ve known that rainfall can attenuate signals in telecommunication, but microwave links from cellular communication networks are of course relatively new,” AART OVEREEMsays Aart Overeem, weather service research and development, Wageningen University.  His team’s research builds upon previous research from Israel and the Netherlands.
Here’s how it works.  MOBILE PHONE ANTENNAS“Electromagnetic signals are transmitted from the antenna of one telephone tower to the antenna of another telephone tower,” says Overeem.  “In case of rainfall the signal is attenuated, which can be seen from a decrease in the received signal power at one end of such a microwave link.  From the decrease in the received signal level during rainy weather compared to the signal level during dry weather, the path-averaged rainfall intensity between the antennas can be estimated.”
WEATHER DATAOvereem says that networks could be used to gauge important climate rainfall data, especially in areas without ground based monitoring, which includes rain gauges and weather radar data.
Rainfall estimates from cellular communication networks could help to improve the number of surface rainfall observations, which could become important for agriculture and food production, water management, climate monitoring, et cetera,” says Overeem, who emphasizes that microwave link data are not meant to as a replacement, but as an addition to existing observational systems.

U of WATERLOOThe University of Waterloo has done similar work using GPS signals.

FRANK SEGLENIEKSFor an interview with Dr. Frank Seglenieks, UW’s weather station coordinator, visit watercanada.net.
—Staff

RAINFALL_MICROWAVE TOWER

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THE DEAD SEA ~ INTERESTING VIDEOS AND FACTS

The Dead Sea is unique not only because it is the lowest point on Earth, but also because it is filled with natural treasures, with zoological and botanic riches and because the region has witnessed remarkable historical events.  The following YouTube video, “The Dead Sea For New 7 Wonders”, uploaded by on Jul 6, 2011, is a wonder in itself ~ creatively crafted and narrated with impressive artistic sand art and accompanied by serene music.


Uploaded by on Aug 25, 2008

To reach the top of the world one would need to be an expert mountaineer, be willing to risk one’s life and be able muster almost superhuman strength. To reach the lowest place on earth, however, one only needs to be ready to enjoy sunshine, good weather and floating in the salty waters of the Dead Sea. 08/25/08

Time.com video ~ “Is the Dead Sea Dying?”
The Dead Sea has long attracted tourists for its mineral-rich waters. But now man-made problems are causing the sea to shrink.
http://www.time.com/time/video/player/0,32068,71715312001_2016083,00.html

“Land Sinking as Dead Sea shrinks” video

The Dead Sea in Jordan is shrinking at an alarming rate – a development that has led to the creation of some 3,000 sinkholes along the sea’s coasts. The sea has shrunk by a third since the 1960s when its major water source – the River Jordan – was diverted for upstream projects in Israel, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan. But for many people, the projects have backfired and the farmers who work near the sea say the once verdant and fertile land has become increasingly barren. Al Jazeera‘s Nisreen el Shamayleh reports from the village of Ghor Al Haditha.- Uploaded by on Feb 2, 2010

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT THE DEAD SEA ~ FROM EHOW and http://www.sfbsc.com/20-dead-sea-facts
The Dead Sea is 3 million years old and is located in the Jordan River Valley bordered by Israel and Jordan.
The Dead sea is 67 miles long and 11 miles wide at its widest point. It’s known as an endorheic (internally drained) lake and is one of the saltiest bodies of water on the planet.
The Dead Sea isn’t actually a sea at all! The Dead Sea is a saltwater lake (10 times saltier than any ocean) and is the lowest elevation on earth.
The shores of Dead Sea mark the lowest elevation on earth,
The atmosphere contains a unique UV filter that allows visitors to soak up therapeutic sunlight without the risk of burning.
Even if you can’t swim, you’ll never sink in the Dead Sea because the minerals make the water so dense you just bob on the surface like a cork.
Many visitors to the Dead Sea rub themselves with the salt or cover their bodies with the black mud, which are said to be good for relieving skin ailments and arthritis.
In 1947 a Bedouin shepherd discovered some of the oldest copies of books of the Bible in a cave above the Dead Sea. These 2,100-year-old manuscripts are known as the Dead Sea Scrolls.
The Dead Sea has been a part of human history since the Bedouin tribes lived in the area in 6,000 B.C.
Cleopatra had factories specializing in cosmetics and resorts built around the Dead Sea because it was one of her favorite places.
The Dead Sea was the most crowded leisure destination in Israel in 2011, with some 857,000 visitors during the year.
The BBC News reported in 2001 that environmentalists predict the sea will vanish by 2050 because the water that replenishes it is being rerouted to the countries of Jordan and Israel for various purposes.

Related link ~
The Telegraph – Can the Dead Sea be brought back to life?
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/9260302/Can-the-Dead-Sea-be-brought-back-to-life.html

UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST RESULTS

Here are the results (see my blog of April 11, 2012) of  the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science underwater photography contest. Some of you may have voted for the “Fun Favorite” category entry online.

Congratulations to Todd Mintz of Canada whose entry won first place in the Macro category! 

Best Overall
Headshield sea slug, Chelidonura hirundinina — St. Thomas USVI Ximena Olds, local Key Biscayne resident, has been named “Best Overall” winner of our 2012 Underwater Photography Contest. Olds captured an orange headshield sea slug with a beautiful green seagrass background in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

This year’s newest category was the online “Fan Favorite,” where the winner was determined by an online voting poll. The winner was Todd Aki, receiving nearly half of the 1,221 online votes, capturing a very colorful jellyfish.

Macro 1st Place
Todd Mintz, Canada
Yellownose gobies, Elacatinus randalli, in bolder brain coral — Bonaire, Dutch Caribbean

Macro 2nd Place
Davide Lopresti, Italy
Porcelain crab, Porcellanella sp. on feathery sea pen
Komodo National Park, Indonesia

Macro 3rd Place
Marcello DiFrancesco, Italy
Emperor shrimp, Periclimenes imperator
Ambon, Indonesia

Wide-angle 1st Place
Mark Fuller, Israel
Lionfish, Pterois sp
Eilat, Israel, Red Sea

Wide-angle 2nd Place
Matt Potenski, New Jersey
Red mangroves, Rhizophora mangle
South Bimini, Bahamas

 

Wide-angle 3rd Place
Bill Lamp’l, Florida
Soft corals and scalefin anthias, Pseudanthias squamipinnis
Bligh Water, Fiji

Fish or Marine Animal Portrait 1st Place
Douglas A. Kahle, Florida
Juvenile sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus — Dominica

 Fish or Marine Animal Portrait
2nd Place

Rockford Draper, Texas
Paddle flap Rhinopias, Rhinopias eschmeyeri
Bali, Indonesia

Fish or Marine Animal Portrait
3rd Place

Nicholas Samaras, Greece

Best Student Entry
Kyra Hartog
Whale shark, Rhincodon typus
Isla Mujeres, Mexico
Nudibranch, Cratena peregrina
Chalkidiki, Greece

Student 2nd Place
Phillip Gillette, Florida
Harlequin shrimp, Hymenocera picta
Similan Islands, Thailand

Student 3rd Place
Austin Gallagher, Florida
Juvenile tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, and lemon shark, Negaprion brevirostris
Bahamas

Student 2nd Place
Phillip Gillette, Florida
Harlequin shrimp, Hymenocera picta
Similan Islands, Thailand

Student 3rd Place
Austin Gallagher, Florida
Juvenile tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, and lemon shark, Negaprion brevirostris
Bahamas

Posted on April 19, 2012 byRSMAS

Link to RSMAS’ slideshow of winning entries – a must see!

http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/outreach/underwater-photography/2012-winners/#!facebox[uw]/11/