Tag Archives: Manotick

Estrogen in drinking water – dangerous!

ESTROGEN IN WATER

The following excerpt from “Removing Estrogen From Drinking Water” appeared on June 25, 2012 on Water Online’s web site.

UNIVERSITY TEAMBielefeld University students participating in iGEM competition
A biological filter to remove estrogens from waste water and drinking water. The 15 Bielefeld students submitting this project to the ‘international Genetically Engineered Machine
IGEMcompetition’ (iGEM) at the MIT LOGOMassachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Boston, USA are setting their sights high. They are persuading internationally active companies and associations in the biotechnology and chemistry sector to contribute several ten thousands of Euros to cover the costs of entering this rapidly expanding global competition in synthetic biology. Since May, they have been spending their free time in the laboratory making new DNA building blocks, reproducing them, and producing enzymes. First results give reason for optimism.

BIRTH CONTROL PILLSThe birth control pill is a widespread contraception method. However, large amounts of these modified estrogens leave the body again in urine. The conventional methods inSEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT sewage treatment plants are unable to treat this waste water sufficiently because the most frequently used estrogen ETHINYL ESTRADIOLethinylestradiol is very difficult to break down. As a result, the hormone finds its way into rivers and lakes and also accumulates in drinking water with serious consequences for fish and other aquatic life. These range from reproductive and severe developmental disorders to the formation of female sexual characteristics in males. TheWATER GLASS long-term consequences of increasing estrogen pollution for human beings are still largely unknown. Nonetheless, declining sperm counts and thereby increasing infertility in men living in industrial nations may well relate to this hormonal pollution. In addition, testicular and prostate cancers as well as osteoporosis (a reduction in bone density) could be a consequence of overly high concentrations of estrogen in the human body.

Bio filters from tree fungi
The goal of the Bielefeld iGEM team is to develop a biological filter in which certain enzymes (so-called laccases) break down the estrogen. Laccases are to be found in many organisms, and one of their properties is an ability to break down aromatic compounds – to which the estrogens belong. One source of particularly efficient laccases for this process is the turkey tail, a type of fungus that likes to grow on trees. The Bielefeld students are aiming to manufacture this enzyme economically and safely with the help of methods from synthetic biology. It should also be possible to extend the concept to other, in part poisonous DRUGS IN WATERand carcinogenic pollutants in drinking and waste water. The students already have one first success to announce: they have managed to isolate the genes of several laccases from various bacteria and have placed them in a standard, allowing further PESTICIDES IN WATERdevelopment. By the time of the European Jamboree in October, they want to have confirmed how the enzymes break down
various substrates such as estrogens, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals and to be starting to immobilize them to filter materials.

Doing research in their own time
The Bielefeld team is composed of 15 students in the Genome-Based Systems Biology, Molecular Cell Biology, and Molecular Biotechnology degree programmes. Participating in the international competition means sacrificing many hours of their own free time, because the Bielefeld students have to carry out the research on top of their regular studies. Moritz Müller, a Master student of Molecular Biotechnology, explains why participating is nonetheless attractive: ‘Taking part in the competition gives you a chance to build up your own laboratory work while you are still studying, to pursue your own ideas, and even carry out your own project. These are the sort of challenges you will be facing in your professional career’. The students are being supported by Professor Dr. Alfred Pühler, Professor Dr. Erwin Flaschel, Dr. Jörn Kalinowski, and Dr. Christian Rückert from Bielefeld University’s CeBiTec (Center for Biotechnology)…

After reading paragraphs 2 and 3, you should be concerned.  Our drinking water – municipal or well is not as healthy for you as you are led to believe.  Also, if  your family is not enjoying the taste of your tap water, you would be wise to consider installing a Rainsoft Reverse Osmosis system (watch video below).  Not only will you enjoy the benefit of pure natural tasting water, but you will stop worrying about the harmful chemicals, pharmaceuticals, including modified estrogens, pesticides and herbicides that are present in your water.

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPED QUESTIONS? ~ Call us to help with your home’s water filtration needs.  More and more people realize that even though they are on municipal water, filtering your home water is a necessity now that evidence states more and more dangerous chemicals such as fluoride, trihalomethanes, lead and pharmaceuticals(i.e. altered estrogen) may be in your water.

RAINSOFTHOUSEWITHLOGO

Eternally Pure Water Systems, Inc.
5450 Canotek Rd., Unit 66-67
Ottawa, ON K1J 9G5
613-742-0058

Check out our customer reviews on Homestars site ~
http://www.rainsoft.homestars.com

http://www.wateronline.com/doc.mvc/removing-estrogen-from-drinking-water-0001?sectionCode=TOC&templateCode=SponsorHeader&user=2702840&source=nl:34337

Relaxing Friday – pool flashmob Gran Canaria

COLLAGE2

Here’s a lovely way to start your weekend by watching as more than 30 musicians from the Municipal School of Dance and Music play “Bolero” by Ravel poolside.

Youtube video,”Splashmob Hotel Cordial Mogán Playa”, Published on May 3, 2013
A flashmob straight from the wonderful pools of Hotel Cordial Mogan Playa, in Puerto de Mogan, Gran Canaria. More than 30 musicians from the Band of the Local Municipal School of Dance and Music of Mogan, surprise our guests playing “Bolero” (Ravel). Music splashes in Hotel Cordial Mogan Playa. Thank you for sharing it, we hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

Un flashmob desde las maravillosas piscinas del Hotel Cordial Mogán Playa, en Puerto de Mogán, Gran Canaria. Más de 30 músicos de la Banda Escuela Municipal de Música y Danza de Mogán sorprenden a nuestros huéspedes con una original interpretación de El Bolero de Ravel. La música se moja en el Hotel Cordial Mogán Playa. Gracias por compartirlo, que lo disfrute tanto como nosotros.

Have a great weekend and we look forward to having you visit with us a while next week.

http://www.cordialcanarias.com

Plastic pipe lining to “protect” drinking water from contamination

 LINE OF DEFENCE
Line of Defence
INPIPE FLEXLINERPipe lining is quickly becoming a cheaper alternative for protecting drinking water from corrosive material and contamination—so what are the benefits? written for Water Canada magazine by Rachel Phan

Who are the major players?
While this trenchless pipe lining technology is relatively new to North America, a number of Canadian companies are offering similar technologies and services to municipalities dealing with rapidly aging infrastructure. These companies include:
FER-PAL  • FER-PAL Infrastructure
INSTITUFORM• Insituform
LIQUIFORCE• LiquiForce Services

ROTHESAY LIGHTHOUSEWhen the town of Rothesay, New Brunswick began to receive complaints about dirty water, it was discovered that the source of the problem was a section of cast iron watermains constructed in the 1960s. Rather than digging up and replacing the pipes, the Town opted to explore other cheaper and less disruptive options. Pipe lining—a relatively new technology in North America—was chosen as the most convenient solution.
Liners are primarily used to solve the problem of municipal water pipe deterioration. When pipes are corroded over time, pipe liners are applied to the inside of unlined cast iron or cement mortar-lined pipes. While older structural spray lining, often called Cured-In-Place- Pipe, is slow setting and requires a minimum 16 hour cure period and an additional 36 hours of service shutdowns, the new generation polyurea pipe linings are rapid-setting and quick cure.
RENEWABLE PIPE LINER“Generally speaking, pipe liners have been specifically developed for the rehabilitation of potable water pipe infrastructure to help extend service life, reduce leaks, and improve water quality by preventing tuberculation—the build-up of corrosive material on the inside of iron piping—that can lead to colour, taste, and odour 3Missues,” says Sylvain Masse, the business development manager of the 3M Infrastructure Protection Division.
“Essentially, liners reduce the contact water has with piping, which in turn reduces the likelihood of water discolouration and poor pressure,” he adds.
Aside from acting as a thin layer of protection, liners can also be applied as a structural addition to the pipe, which means the layer of liner can act as a pipe in the event that the actual pipe fails due to age or corrosion.

PIPE CONTAMINATIONAs a result, pipe liners can prevent contaminants from reaching water in cases where the earth surrounding a corroding pipe is contaminated.
The Town of Rothesay came across the new lining technology after receiving complaints about poor pressure and water becoming yellowish or rusty during high flow events. While these issues are not generally health hazards, the discoloured water is often unsettling for customers. In 2011, Rothesay started a trial run project where 1,000 metres of cast iron pipe were relined in about three to four weeks.
“Initially, it was very attractive to do the relining versus digging up pipes and replacing them because there was minimal disruption to the customer and it was cost saving for the municipality,” says Bruce King, Rothesay’s utilities coordinator. “The benefit of relining outweighed the process of replacing the pipe.”
In Rothesay, approximately 100 metres of pipes were relined in a day, and for the most part, the water was back in service by night on sections that were relined that day (albeit on a boil water advisory while the process was ongoing). This made the process relatively pain-free for residents.
The original trial run was so successful that the Town of Rothesay applied the liner to an additional 1,600 metres of iron pipe in 2012, which took approximately four to five weeks to complete. An engineer estimates that the 2012 project was about 36 per cent of the cost to replace the pipe.
DIRTY WATER“There was a dramatic drop in dirty water complaints and the process was fairly easy,” King says. “We received a lot of immediate positive feedback, especially about the water quality improvement.”
He says Rothesay has plans to reline its last remaining cast iron mains in 2014. In the meantime, the technology continues to gain popularity with municipalities looking for a cost-effective alternative to replacing aging infrastructure. WC

RACHELRachel Phan is Water Canada’s managing editor

http://watercanada.net/2014/line-of-defence/

 

Cats steal dogs’ beds – funny and adorable!

Time for another fun Friday.
Enjoy and share.
Have a great weekend.

CATS STEAL DOGS' BEDS
Cats do what they want to do and sleep where they want to sleep regardless of who the bed belongs to.
 
Watch what these dogs when they discover the cat has stolen their bed.

The following youtube video “Cats Stealing Dog Beds” was published on 19 Oct 2013by ailaikvis.

Cats love cozying up in small spaces. Cats can also be furry little jerks. So, it’s safe to assume that when a cat decides to sleep in the (much larger) bed of a dog sibling, it’s done purely to screw with the dog.

Sadly, dogs are too polite for confrontation and resort to halfhearted pleas with their feline occupier. On the other hand, it appears as if the cats couldn’t care less.

Canada’s First Nations’ containerized sewage treatment

THINK INSIDE BOX

Thinking Inside the Box

For Canada’s remote First Nations, smaller towns, and suburban developments, containerized sewage treatment promises plenty of benefits. Are we ready to rethink small systems?
This article was written by Julie Stauffer and appeared in Jan/Feb 2014 issue of WaterCanada magazine.
SEWAGE LAGOONAcross the country, small towns are facing the problem of sewage lagoons nearing capacity or reaching the end of their lives. On First Nation reserves in particular, more than half the wastewater systems have been classified as high or medium risk. Meanwhile, urban Canadian municipalities are spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to connect new outlying developments to existing treatment plants.
TRISHAccording to Trish Johnson, a senior environmental consultant at R.V. Anderson Associates Ltd., the status quo approach to small sewage systems no longer makes sense. “We have to do
things differently,” she says.
Bullish on boxes. ECO LIBRA SYSTEM
More and more companies are betting the answer lies in packaged or containerized sewage treatment. The concept is simple. Fit your technology—complete with plumbing and electrical—into a shipping container or trailer, transport it to your site via truck or barge, hook everything up, and suddenly, you’ve got a functioning system in a matter of days at a fraction of the cost of conventional plants. As an added bonus, the effluent that comes out the other end is just as good—or better—than in traditional facilities.
ECOLIBRATake the example of EcoLibra Systems. A few years ago, this Saskatoon based company was building sewage treatment plants from scratch with all the contracting headaches and weather delays that accompany any construction project. CEO Jason Tratch then decided to package his company’s lime-based treatment technology in a standard 40-foot sea container. The resulting system serves roughly 300 people, and to scale up, the user simply adds another container.
FILTERBOXXMeanwhile, for the past 13 years, Calgary’s FilterBoxx Packaged Water Solutions Inc. has been providing water and sewage treatment in the work camps of Northern Alberta, “literally 500 miles north of nowhere,” CEO Larry Novachis says.CEO NOVACHIS
The packaged membrane bioreactor sewage treatment systems serve anywhere from 600 people to more than 5,000. Now, FilterBoxx is expanding its clientele to small communities, First Nations, resorts, and hotels. “If the camp people put their faith in a packaged approach day in and day out in –50°C, there’s no reason why a small town or an Indian reserve couldn’t either,” Novachis says.
There are dozens of other examples. Treatment containers from Canadian-owned Nomadic have seen action everywhere from fly-in fishing camps in British Columbia to mining camps in Siberia. Siemens has installed its Xpress system at Tsuu T’ina Nation’s Grey Eagle Casino in Calgary, while Quebec-based Bionest piloted their Kodiak system in the Arctic town of Iqaluit.
And whether the company uses an activated sludge process, rotating biological contractors, chemicals, or membrane technology to treat wastewater, the objectives remain the same: provide a packaged system that is effective, easy to transport, and simple to maintain.
‘It’s a slam dunk’
So how do boxed systems stack up against conventional approaches? When compared to lagoons—the go-to solution for most Canadian communities of 5,000 people or fewer—the big CCMENEWadvantage for small systems is performance. While lagoons are a well-established technology, a 2006 Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment report cites problems with odour issues and high ammonia levels in the treated discharge.
As environmental regulations get stricter, Novachis expects more towns to look for alternatives to lagoon systems. Packaged or WATERTREATMENT PLANTcontainerized systems are highly reliable, he says. They have a significantly smaller footprint than a lagoon, plus they’re enclosed, avoiding odour issues. Most importantly, they produce an effluent that can be reused for anything from washing equipment to watering golf courses. “Really, it’s a slam dunk going packaged versus lagoon,” Novachis says.
Packaged systems have advantages over bricks-and-mortar facilities, too. In remote communities where on-site construction costs can run 10 times as high as urban areas, packaged systems make financial sense. While the material costs are similar to a so-called “stick-built” system, Novachis says, the huge savings on installation cut total ownership costs between a half and two-thirds.
Tratch also points out the economies of scale created when a company manufactures standardized packages rather than constructing a custom-built facility. Packaged systems can be designed and installed much faster than the 18 to 24 months typically required to build a plant from scratch. “We can have a sea can at your door, ready to turn the key, within three to four months,” he says.
As for suburban settings, packaged systems allow municipalities to expand without the need to connect nodes of development to treatment plants dozens of kilometres away. Tratch says he’s
getting calls from developers putting in 100 or 150 houses on the outskirts of town. “This is a big new market,” he says.
And the advantages of small systems do not end there. Packaged systems don’t require specialized expertise, which is ideal for small communities where highly trained engineers and operational staff are not always available. Take the example of an EcoLibra system: “Every three to four days, someone’s going to have to go into the plant and add the green chemical to the green bin, the blue chemical to the blue bin, and then swap out the bag that was collecting the sludge,” Tratch says. Compared to more traditional systems, this process is relatively easy.
As for FilterBoxx, it has 35 certified water and wastewater professionals in Stony Plain, Alberta dedicated to running the plants it installs.
Moving forward
In a country still dominated by big pipe,
urban-focused thinking, manufacturers of packaged and containerized systems face a few hurdles. One of the biggest, according to Johnson, is policy. “Buttoned down” and “risk adverse” federal protocols require operators and backup systems that are exorbitantly expensive, she says.

And while some provinces do allow communities to manage private systems, others insist new suburban developments should be connected to existing sewage.
Then there’s the additional problem facing any new technology: unfamiliarity.
While the engineering companies that design and build municipal plants know all about bricks-and-mortar plants, plug-and-play systems are a different ballgame. “I think the next guys that need to change is the small and the large engineering firms,” Tratch says.
However, Johnson points to economic drivers, the data flowing in from pilot plants, the federal government’s willingness to look at alternatives for First Nations, and the growing number of qualified vendors as signs that attitudes are shifting. “Once we start to put out the information and the results, and the proof of the pudding is there, we’re going to see huge changes,” she predicts. WC
Julie Stauffer is an award-winning freelance writer and the owner of Cadmium Red Communications.

http://watercanada.net/2014/thinking-inside-the-box/

Fun Friday ~ Is it spring yet where you live???

These cartoons say it all! 

Enjoy and share.

145963 600 First Day of Spring cartoons

145996 600 Spring cartoons

145997 600 Spring fashions cartoons

145658 600 First Robin cartoons

145574 600 THE ARRIVAL OF SPRING cartoons

145728 600 Spring Snowflakes cartoons

129345 600 Stuck in Winter cartoons

 

129324 600 Spring Snow cartoons

129247 600 Winter March Madness cartoons

128955 600 Spring cartoons

129003 600 Spring cartoons

128907 600 First day of spring cartoons

 

Snow – an untapped commodity in Canada

Recently Updated3
MONTREAL SNOWSTORM

Waste Not, Want Not,
“Are Canadians turning a blind eye to the untapped potential of snow?” by Clark Kingsbury, assistant editor of WaterCanada.
IT IS NO SURPRISE that snow is cumbersome for cities. It must be removed from streets and disposed of as swiftly as possible, creating an organizational headache and a monetary burden. For example, the City of Montreal spent $120 million to remove 13 million cubic metres of snow in 2006.

WASTE NOT WANT NOT
Generally speaking, snow in Canadian cities is collected and dumped in a snow disposal facility (SDF), where it is left to melt over the course of the year. But alternatives where snow is treated as an untapped commodity rather than as an expensive nuisance are slowly being suggested both in Canada and abroad.
MONTREAL UNIVERSITYPatrick Evans is an architect and professor of environmental design at the Université de Québec à Montréal, as well as the author of the children’s book ‘Where the Snow Goes’. He believes that the snow Montreal receives can be used either as a source of energy, or as a “visible, celebratory, urban event.”  Evans traces his interest in snow removal and its possible re-use back to his first winter in Montreal in the 1990s.
“I think it was the sheer unadulterated awe of witnessing the late night winter choreography of snow removal in Montreal’s narrow urban streets,” he wrote in an email. “Even then, I was immediately struck by the question: where does the snow go?”
… Evans suggests that we take a more creative and useful approach to snow removal—an idea that has been gaining traction at different locations around the world.
SWEDISH HOSPITALIn their study, Potential Utilization of City Owned Snow Disposal STRANDARD SNOW DISPOSAL SITEFacilities for Seasonal Cooling in Ottawa, Canada, Paul Cipcigan and Frederick Michel state that more than 100 seasonal storage systems exist in Japan and China, as well as a seasonal cooling project at the county hospital in Sundsvall, Sweden, part of Västernorrland County.
SUNDSVALL HOSPITALPrior to the year 2000, the 190,000 metre-squared hospital used a conventional cooling system to control the indoor climate and to ensure technical equipment didn’t overheat. However, a new cooling facility was eventually constructed at a nearby repository for snow cleared from area streets. Snow is stored in a sever-metre-deep bowl-shaped asphalt basin and is insulated with wood chips during the spring and summer to slow the melting process.
VASTERNORRLANDSAccording to the Vasternorrland County Council’s website, meltwater is “pumped through the heat exchanger where the water cools the technical equipment as well as the ventilation air, which passes through the hospital.” The water warms through this process and is used to melt more snow on its way back through the system.
Efforts have been made to incorporate similar technologies in Canada. Cipcigan and Michel’s paper describes…
“The principle behind the seasonal storage of ice/snow technologies consists of utilizing the energy stored as latent heat in the phase change of water into ice during winter. The natural snow/ice collected during winter is then stored until summer when it is used as a sink for the heat removed during cooling of buildings or other industrial processes.”
“The heat transfer is done through a heat exchanger and the cooling agent can be either re-circulated or discharged after use. The most common cooling agents used are water, ice/snow meltwater, and air, which are more environmentally friendly than the ones used by the conventional chiller systems.”
Cipcigan and Michel’s study, conducted in the winter of 2008/2009, investigates the amount of potential cold energy available from the Conroy SDF in Ottawa. “The cold energy,” the report reads, “is the amount of heat that can be consumed or dissipated during cooling.”
CONROY SDFThe report determined that in the winter of 2008/2009, the Conroy SDF held around 500,000 cubic metres of snow, from which an estimated 30,430 MWh was available. The study goes on to assume a 30-per-cent loss of snow before temperatures would necessitate cooling, based on the experience at the Sundsvall hospital. Even after the snow loss, the facility would possess an estimated 21,300 MWh of available energy.
The report also presented energy use data from a city-owned office building with 39,000 square metres of floor space, which was cooled during the warmer months by a pair of rooftop chillers. The
average annual energy consumption of the two chillers from 2005 to 2009 was 512 MWh, costing $51,200 based on the cost of energy in 2009.
Comparing energy consumption figures at the office building and stored energy at the Conroy SDF, the report states that the volume of snow stored at the Conroy SDF “represents the equivalent cooling energy for over 40 buildings similar to the one analyzed, with a total floor space of approximately 1.6 million square metres and an estimated annual energy value of over $2 million.” The value was again based on energy prices in 2009.
“If all city SDFs were filled to capacity—approximately three million M3 – the energy potential after a 30 percent per season loss allowance represents roughly 130,000 MWh of cooling energy, currently worth an estimated $12.5 million annually,” the report continues.
Although the City of Ottawa, citing issues of cost and space for snow storage, decided not to pursue the exploitation of snow and ice for its cold energy potential, Cipcigan and Michel’s report, along with successful examples in Sweden and elsewhere, highlights the possibilities available to those cities lucky enough to exist in a northern climate.

It’s spring in Canada??? ~ BIG JOKE!

 “WHO STOLE OUR SPRING?
WE WANT IT BACK!”
YESTERDAY, MARCH 20th, WAS
THE FIRST DAY OF SPRING
AND SHOULD LOOK LIKE THIS - 

SPRING OTTAWA COLLAGE

NOT FROM WHAT WE SEE HERE!…

BREAKDANCING ARCHAEOLOGY

SKATE PARK PARKING ROMANCE

FAST FOOD

QWMNVb9 (2)

IMAGE7

IMAGE6

IT’S SPRING, EH!

CARDINAL

COULD’A FOOLED ME!!!

FRIGID SPRING

I don’t think I’ll see grass in my  front or back yard until July or August!

Thank you to Sandy Rinaldo of CTV Evening News for the opening quote.

Also, thanks to themetafile.com for all the great images!
http://themetapicture.com/things-are-somehow-different-in-canada/

“Bet you didn’t know water sponges are animals”!!!

SEA SPONGES

ROPE SPONGE2The title quotation, “Bet you didn’t know sponges are animals” is from Dr. Jonathan Bird, on his studies of living sea sponges.
TUBE SPONGESponges live at the bottom of the ocean attached to the surface – never moving.
ENCRUSTING SPONGESSponges look like plants, but are multi-cellular animals.
Sponges are found in the Arctic, Antarctic oceans and the tropics on many coral reefs. These ancient animals have been around for 1/2 billion years.
BARREL SPONGEThe most common is the barrel sponge, some of which can grow larger than a person.
According to Jonathan these sponges are “not as cool as sharks, but still fascinating animals.”

youtube video “Jonathan Bird’s Blue World: Sponges!” published on Mar 11, 2014

BASE SPONGEA sponge might not look like much, but these simple animals with no brain or ability to move have lived on Earth for hundreds of millions of years. They can hunt prey and spawn, and Jonathan demonstrates how in this fascinating segment about the biology of sponges!

There are more than 14,000 videos and webisodes on Jonathan Bird’s Blue World’s site and Youtube – all entertaining, amazing and thrilling!

Never, Ever Give Up!!! ~ Inspirational Friday with Diamond Dallas Page

NEVEFR GIVE UP

Arthur’s story is highlighted from the beginning, in the upcoming documentary, INSPIRED: The Movie.http://www.inspiredthemovie.com
(Thanks to filmmaker Steve Yu for putting this inspirational video together!) Published on Apr 30, 2012.

10 million views of the Youtube video (below) so far!

Arthur Boorman was a disabled veteran of the Gulf War for 15 years, and was told by his doctors that he would never be able to walk on his own, ever again.

He stumbled upon an article about Diamond Dallas Page doing Yoga and decided to give it a try – he couldn’t do traditional, higher impact exercise, so he tried DDP YOGA and sent an email to Dallas telling him his story.

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Dallas was so moved by his story, he began emailing and speaking on the phone with Arthur throughout his journey – he encouraged Arthur to keep going and to believe that anything was possible. Even though doctors told him walking would never happen, Arthur was persistent. He fell many times, but kept going.

Arthur was getting stronger rapidly, and he was losing weight at an incredible rate! Because of DDP’s specialized workout, he gained tremendous balance and flexibility – which gave him hope that maybe someday, he’d be able to walk again.

His story is proof, that we cannot place limits on what we are capable of doing, because we often do not know our own potential. Neither Arthur, nor Dallas knew what he would go on to accomplish, but this video speaks for itself. In less than a year, Arthur completely transformed his life. If only he had known what he was capable of, 15 years earlier.

Do not waste any time thinking you are stuck – you can take control over your life, and change it faster than you might think. 

Hopefully this story can inspire you to follow your dreams – whatever they may be.
Anything is Possible!
If this story can inspire someone you know,
please share it with them!

For more information about DDP YOGA, visit http://bit.ly/Kqewdp

To contact Arthur or Dallas Page about this incredible story, please visit http://www.ddpbang.com and contact them.

Related article link ~