Tag Archives: Norway

Arctic/Antarctic Photography ~ Exceptional!!!

“The Fragile Beauty of Earth’s Polar Regions” was posted to discovermagazine’s web site Fri. Oct. 31, 2014.

Our planet’s most extreme environments are also some of its most threatened. 

CAMILLEPhotographer Camille Seaman first traveled to the Arctic in 1999. Between 2003 and 2011, she visited the Arctic and Antarctic on a yearly basis, ranging from one pole to the other as an expedition photographer aboard science vessels and commercial ships.
In her new book Melting Away, Seaman collects the photographs and essays that resulted from this exploration of our increasingly fragile polar regions. Here are some of our favorites:
RUNNING TO SEE

Running to See
Of this photo, taken on the Ross Sea in Antarctica, Camille writes:
“I watched the penguins travel across the ice for hours. They would waddle and fall, waddle and slide, and little by little they came all the way over to see our massive ship wedged in the sea ice. They looked at us by turning their heads first to the left, then to the right. After thirty minutes of them looking at us and us looking at them, the penguins decided they still didn’t know what we were or why we were there. They turned around and began their long journey back to their home.”

WHALEWhale Remains
This beach in Svalbard, Norway, was used by whalers since the early 1600s. The large whale vertebra in the foreground is evidence of their activities, which ended in the 1930s.

SUNSETPainterly Sunset
This photo, taken in the Antarctic Sound, put Camille in mind of the sunsets painted by J.M.W. Turner.
“In late February, as we headed north through the Antarctic Sound, we were fortunate to experience an Antarctic sunset. The colors were epic. The sun set in front of us and was rising behind us at the same time. Truly an experience I will never forget.”

HARSH LANDSCAPEHarsh Landscape
These oil drums, photographed outside the Brazilian base in Antarctica in 2007, foreshadowed the destruction of the base in a fire in 2012. “Antarctica is an unforgiving place,” Camille says.

CRYSTAL CLEARCrystal Clear
The jaw-dropping vista of the Rasmussen Glacier in Scoresbysund, eastern Greenland.

ALL AFLUTTERAll Aflutter
Of this photo taken in eastern Greenland, Camille writes:
“As our ship passed by this iceberg, which stood some three hundred feet out of the water, the birds were disturbed enough to leave their resting spots. I love the elephant-skin quality of the surface of this berg.”

SLOW COLLISIONSlow Collision
John Palmer, a doctor from Australia, also serves as a traffic operator for the icebreaker’s two helicopters. Here, he looks off into the distance where two massive icebergs are about to collide in a strong swell. One of the helicopters (too small to see in this image) had flown out to observe the icebergs up close.

CLOUD COVERCloud Cover
Camille writes,
“Antarctica is big, but the sky is bigger. The clouds that cover Antarctica can seem enormous, and when the clouds are lit by the sun magic can happen. I tend to spend as much time as I can out on deck, always looking, always ready. On this evening my diligence was rewarded.”

WALRUSWalrus v. Hut
This hefty walrus in Svalbard, Norway, makes the nearby hut look tiny by comparison.

BLUE DIAMOND ICEBERGBlue Diamond
This iceberg, calved off the Kongsfjord Glacier in Svalbard, Norway, showed its “true colors” thanks to the overcast day.

POLAR BEARFond Farewell
Of this young bear, photographed in Svalbard, Norway, Camille writes: “She looked at us as we sat in our zodiac. The passengers were eating chocolate covered strawberries and sipping champagne from long-stemmed glasses. I wondered what she thought as she looked at us. Her mother was about a thousand feet away and raised her head every now and then to get a good whiff of her cub. She was almost two years old, almost ready to leave her mother and go off on her own. I will probably never see her again. I wished her luck as I took this photo.”

http://discovermagazine.com/galleries/2014/dec/arctic#74686

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CHRISTMAS/NEW YEARS QUIZ ~ HAVE FUN WITH THIS!

 CHRISTMAS QUIZ  

  CHRISTMAS BLOG ANIMATED4~ SCROLL DOWN FOR ANSWERS ~

1)  Who invented electric Christmas lights?
Thomas Edison
Gottlieb Daimler
James Naismith 

2)  How many people in the world know the carol “Silent Night”?
10 million
1 billion
3 billion

3)  What is the ninth candle in the Hanukkah Menorah for?
It lights the other candles
It’s blown out first
It’s a candle for children

4)  Who flies through the air and fills children’s stockings with candy and presents?
Santa Claus
La Befana

5)  British people wear paper crowns at Christmas events because of
The Three Kings
Queen Elizabeth
Christmas crackers

6)  What does “Auld Lang Syne” mean?
Old friends
Long, long ago
Good memories

7)  Why do Southerners eat black-eyed peas and greens on New Years’ Day?
To honor farmer forefathers
To cure a hangover

8)  Who first used live people in a Nativity scene?
St. Francis of Assisi
Queen Victoria
Pope Pius XII

9)  How much does the New Year’s Eve ball in Times Square weigh?
5,619 pounds
11,875 pounds
21,200 pounds

10)  Candied lotus seeds are a popular Chinese New Year’s treat and are said to bring:
Good luck
Better finances
Boy children

11)  Pointsettias get their name from?
Their lovely, pointed leaves
The Spanish word for flower
A U.S. minister to Mexico

12)  What sports activity is celebrated on Christmas Day in Ireland?
Cross country skiing
Skating
Swimming

13)  What do children leave outside the door in Germany on Nikolaustag on December 6th?
toque
mitten
boot

14)  In areas of France what burns in homes from Christmas Eve to New Year’s Day?
incense
simmering fruit
a log

15)  What do Norwegian families hide on Christmas Eve?
boots
knives
brooms

CHRISTMAS BLOG ANIMATED4      ~ Here are your answers ~ 

CHRISTMAS STRING LIGHTS1)  Thomas Edison – he not only invented the electric light bulb, He also created the first strand of electric lights. He hung them outside his New Jersey lab during Christmas season in 1880. Lights for Christmas trees weren’t sold to the public until 1917.

SILENT NIGHT2)  3 billion – Of the roughly 7 billion people on Earth about 3 billion are familiar with “Silent Night.” The carol was first heard on Christmas Eve 1818, in Oberndorf, Austria, and was written by Joseph Mohr and Franz Gruber. It has been translated into more than 300 languages

HANNUKKAH MANORAH3)  It lights the other candles – The ninth candle is the “shamash,” which is used to light the other candles. Hanukkah is an eight-day Jewish holiday marking the defeat of an army that had invaded Israel. After the victory, the Jews celebrated at the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. They found enough oil to light the lamp for only one day. But the oil lasted eight days and nights, and it’s celebrated as a miracle.

SANTA CLAUS4)  Both – American children know Santa, but Italian children wait for La Befana, the good witch who rides a broomstick the night ofLA BEFANA January 5th. The children wake up on January 6th – the Feast of the Epiphany – to find toys, candy, and fruit that she left. Some families in Hispanic communities in the U.S. practice traditions brought from Latin  American countries. Children place hay and water under their beds the night of January 5, for the camels of the Three Kings, and wake up to find presents.

CRACKERS5)  Christmas crackers (pretty paper tubes that you pull apart) – are a British tradition. The tubes pop open with a bang when pulled. Inside, there’s a small gift like a mirror and a joke written on a piece of paper. There’s also a paper crown, a nod to the Lord of Misrule, an old custom that put a peasant in charge of village Christmas events. Brits wear the crown and read the joke out loud.

AULD LANG SYNE6)  long, long ago – This well-known New Year’s Eve tune is from a poem by Robert Burns, based on a Scottish folk song. “Should old acquaintance be forgot, and never brought to mind? Should old acquaintance be forgot, and auld lang syne.” It’s a tribute to days gone by.  The words are in the Scots language, which today is spoken in the Lowlands and Northern Isles of Scotland.

PEAS AND GREENS7)  To bring wealth in the New Year – The black-eyed peas stand for coins. The greens or collards stand for paper money. Eating these dishes is supposed to bring good luck and wealth in the coming year.  Cultures around the world celebrate the New Year with foods meant to bring prosperity: fish in China, lentils in Italy, and gold-colored food in Peru. (The tint often comes from the spice turmeric.)

NATIVITY SCENE8)  St. Francis of Assisi – widely known today for his love of animals — created the first live nativity scene, in 1223 in the Italian village of Greccio. He recreated the scene of Christ’s birth with people playing Mary and Joseph and animals from the village as the creatures in the stable.

N Y EVE BALL9)  11,875 – It’s also covered with 2,688 Waterford crystal triangles. Americans began dropping a giant ball at New Year’s Eve in 1907. The first was a 700-pound iron-and-wood beauty lowered from a flagpole atop One Times Square.

LOTUS10)  Boy children – In China, lotus seeds symbolize male children. Eating the sweetened seeds is supposed to bring boy babies into your family.

POINTSETTIAS11)  U.S. minister to Mexico – The poinsettia is native to Mexico, where it’s used to decorate churches at Christmas. It gets its name from American diplomat Joel Poinsett, who introduced the flower to the U.S. in the 1800s. The red and white parts of the poinsettia — which some people think are petals — are actually colored leaves called bracts.

IRISH12)  Swimming!  There are some intrepid people who get out in the open air and away from all the excess on Christmas morning, though it can be fairly miserable out there at that time of year.  One long standing tradition in Sandycove, a suburb of South Dublin is the Christmas Day Swim – in the sea. Yes, in Ireland, in December, they swim in the freezing Irish sea – and let me tell you it is MUCH colder even that it looks in the picture! Crazy, but they say it’s fun!

BOOT13)  On December 6 is Nikolaustag, St. Claus day. A shoe or boot is left outside the door on Dec.5 with hopes the following morning you find presents, if you were good – or, unfortunately a rod if you had been bad.

BURNING LOG14)  In southern France, it is a tradition among some families to burn a log in their homes from Christmas Eve until New Year’s Day. In olden days, farmers would use a part of this log to make the wedge for the plough as good luck for the next harvest. In Lyon, December 8th is annually celebrated as the Festival of Lights or ‘fete des lumieres’ in honour of Mother Mary for all the blessings through the year. Other important French traditions include the Nativity Scene, the midnight feast called ‘le reveillon’ and Pere Noel.

BROOMS15)  Norwegian legend has it that when Christmas Eve arrives it brings with it a series of evil spirits and witches.  The evil spirits and witches could not just walk from place to place but needed a form of transportation to fly around and they often used brooms for this.  It is Christmas tradition for Norwegian families to hide all brooms, mops and brushes on Christmas Eve so that these trouble makers can not use them.

christmas_animated_gifs_05

link ~  http://www.webmd.com/balance/rm-quiz-holiday-traditions?ecd=wnl_wmh_122513&ctr=wnl-wmh-122513_ld-stry&mb=rHKmwhyk2PvM%40wJ88MZOheHnVev1imbCTxvaq5IOIhg%3d

     

 

VIDEO GONE VIRAL~ NORWAY ATLANTIC ROAD TRIP

It’s no wonder this video has gone viral ~
incredible, awesome, phenomenal!!!

This video was taken the day after the storm “Dagmar” hit the shore. This storm caused a lot of damage in the area. The Atlantic Road was built in 1983-1989 and has become a very popular road for tourists visiting the north-west coast of Norway.

Atlanterhavsveien or The Atlantic Ocean Road is a two-lane highway in Norway connecting the island of Averøy with the mainland at Eide ~ has been declared the world’s best road trip. ENJOY YOUR RIDE!

Interesting Facts about the Atlantic Road Highway

~ Road: Fv. 64 between Vevang in the municipality of Eide and Kårvåg in the municipality of Averøy in Møre og Romsdal.
~ Length: 8.27 kilometres. The Atlantic Road is part of the 36 kilometre long National Tourist Route between Bud and Kårvåg.
~ construction started 1 August 1983. During construction, the area was hit by twelve hurricanes. The highway opened 7 July 1989.
~ 8 bridges totaling a length of 891 metres
~ cost 122 million Norwegian kroner = 20.9449424 million Canadian dollars
~ 25 percent of the cost was financed with tolls and the rest from public grants. Collection of tolls was scheduled to run for 15 years, but by June 1999 the road was paid off and the toll removed.
~ There are four panoramic views and rest areas with facilities in bold architectural forms along the Atlantic Road.
~ people can enjoy the view of the Atlantic Ocean, a rich bird life, spotted seals and whales on rare occasions.

Links ~

 ~ http://www.visitnorway.com/the-atlantic-road

                    ~ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Ocean_Road

http://idharudhar.indiafanclub.com/the-atlantic-ocean-road-or-the-atlantic-road-drive-on-the-coastal-egde-of-norway/#sthash.21ld5bq0.5LP1dsg7.dpbs

NOWHEREISLAND (PART 2) – ABOUT THE PROJECT

Nowhereisland is a public art project conceived by artist Alex Hartley.

It is one of 12 arts projects across the UK, funded by the Arts Council of England, which will form part of the Cultural Olympiad in summer 2012.

Imagine an Arctic island travelling south – a landscape on the move. After leaving the Kingdom of Norway, the island enters international waters and is declared a new island nation – Nowhereisland. This new nation continues its journey to the south west coast of England, where it opens its embassy and participates in the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad.

This is the idea of Alex Hartley, an artist known for his photographic and sculptural depictions of remote landscapes. Alex’s proposal, made for the Cultural Olympiad, is on an epic scale and reflects the ambition and endeavor of the Olympic spirit.

 http://nowhereisland.org/about/

Furzy Cliff in Weymouth is the site of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic sailing events. On the 25th July 2012  Nowhereisland will be floating off-shore, accompanied by its land based Embassy and where it will begin a six-week journey around the south west coast of England, finishing in Bristol on the 9th September 2012.

This idea began back in 2004, when, Alex visited the High Arctic with the climate change organization, Cape Farewell. The artist explored the northernmost polar landmass – a landscape shaped by the rapidly receding ice cap and marked by a human history of prospecting and exploration. Here explorers have attempted extraordinary feats of endurance and many have failed. This is a place over which nations have fiercely debated their territorial and mining rights and an area to which migrants have flocked in search of a place to belong. And it is here that Alex Hartley discovered a new island.

In the autumn of 2011, he returned to the Arctic and with the permission of the Norwegian government, sailed a portion of this island territory north beyond the jurisdiction of the Kingdom of Norway.

Just above the 80th parallel, the territory reached international waters, where it was declared a new island nation – Nowhereisland. Joining Alex on the expedition were a team of young people and specialists in international law, environmental and political campaigning, human migration, anthropology and psychology, who worked together to produce a programme of ideas and resources to be used in the year-long schools and education programme

Nowhereisland has already come to represent the possibilities for thinking about our values and beliefs as citizens. 52 Resident Thinkers from around the world are contributing to a year-long programme of Letters to Nowhereisland. Over 4000 people have already signed up to become citizens of Nowhereisland and will begin collectively writing the island’s constitution from January 2012.

This is a real place on the move. But it belongs to nowhere. It is an island nation that has come from a place that is deeply implicated by global decisions. It offers us the chance to reflect on where we belong and what nationhood means, and, in a time of global crisis, it opens up an opportunity to debate and consider important global questions that affect us all.

Above all, it allows us to reflect on Alex Hartley’s original question – if we were to create a new nation, how might we begin?

The Nowhereisland programme is already in full swing. We are working with 20 community organisations in seven towns and cities across south west England to shape the host programme of events and activities set to reach 250,000 people. Schools are using Nowhereisland as a catalyst for teaching on citizenship, geography and politics over the next 12 months and 52 thinkers across the globe are sitting down to compose their Letters to Nowhereisland.

The Nowhereisland Embassy will exist in two forms – online and as a mobile museum accompanying Nowhereisland’s sea journey on land. The Embassy will be packed full of information and activities about the many different ideas inspired by the project from the origins of the island in the Arctic, to nationhood, citizenship, land grab, cllimate change and hospitality. The mobile museum will be staffed and parked up at a vantage point for Nowhereisland so that anyone can find out more, ask questions and get involved in activities. It will also be the site for events such as welcome ceremonies, expert talks and workshops.

For more information, on the project, check out the FAQs:

http://nowhereisland.org/about/#!/about/frequently-asked-questions/

AWESOME SCIENCE!: TOP VIDEOS FROM LAST NIGHT’S (JAN. 24, 2012) STUNNING NORTHERN LIGHTS SHOW

For the last few days, Earth has been bombarded with radiation as the strongest solar storm since 2005 raged. This geomagnetic storm has resulted in a wealth in stunning videos of the northern lights. The lights were most vibrant in northern Europe, but did reach into Canada and Alaska.

Some of the videos on this site you can enjoy!:
– extremely vibrant footage from Sweden by photographer Chad Blakley:
– footage compiled by the Associated Press:
– short but sweet clip taken from Old Knik River Bridge in Alaska:
– footage from Trondheim, Norway:
– the show from Finland:
And photographs sent to us from Jason, a Blaze reader, from Fairbanks, Alaska:
http://www.theblaze.com/stories/these-are-the-top-videos-from-last-nights-stunning-northern-lights-show/