Tag Archives: PBS

Adorable Movie Star! ~ Sea Otter 501

1-OTTER 501Saving Otter 501 aired Wednesday, October 16, 2012 .  A baby sea otter abandoned on the beach was brought in to the Monterey Bay Aquarium. This is the aquarium’s 501st attempt to save an orphan otter. Against all odds, will she be able to return to her home in the wild?

Meet Otter 501 | Saving Otter 501 | PBS, published on Oct 14, 2013 – This little sea creature is the star of the documentary film Otter 501, which tells the story of a sea otter who was rescued after she lost her mom as a young pup in Monterey Bay. As she is being dried off, she gets a bit sneezy! There must be something in the air.
href=”//www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddm5bbeqHVA&w=560&h=315]”>

Baby otter squeaks when introduced to water

Sea Otter Orphan Gets Adopted | Nature | PBS – published on Oct 11, 2013 – Can an orphan sea otter pup be accepted by a surrogate mother to learn how to survive and thrive back in the wild?
href=”//www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdy7DEhvsVU&w=560&h=315]”>

After about 3 months, Otter 501 begins to master otter lessons, but there are plenty of other challenges to face in the wild. 

Toola Feeds 501 – Toola shows lil’ 501 how to use tools to open shells containing delicious food, a crucial skill for sea otter survival in the wild

Otter 501 Tries Solid Food – About this video: Are we wrong to think that she’s not impressed? After being bottle fed, Otter 501 was offered solid food in the form of shellfish. Monterey Bay Aquarium caretakers beat shells together to mimic the sound a mother otter makes when she breaks open prey.

Otter 501 Eats Crab on Her Own – After months of help from caretakers and her surrogate mother, Otter 501 has finally developed the skills to eat a live crab all on her own! This is a critical step – once she’s returned to the wild she’ll have to find and consume foods like this all on her own.
 

Otter 501’s Release Back to the Wild – published on Jun 22, 2012 – About this video: June 22, 2012: Otter 501, the star of our feature-length film of the same name, has been living back in the wild for a full year. Her release was the end of an amazing story, but the beginning of her second chance.

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDUnfortunately the full length video, “Saving Otter 501” is no longer available, however you can purchase the video at:

http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=24534426&utm_source=PBS&utm_medium=Link&utm_content=naat_savingotter501_covebuyit&utm_campaign=cove_buyit

Film Description: A storm grows, a sea otter pup is separated from her mother, and a young woman bound for adventure blows in to town. On a windswept beach these lives collide and an entire species’ survival gets personal. Katie and our playful pup, otter number 501, learn to navigate the opportunities and risks of life without anchor while we see the incredible efforts people have undertaken to return sea otters from the brink of extinction. Framed against the strikingly beautiful Monterey Bay coastline we discover just how serious this threat remains. Their adventure, unexpected as it was, illustrates what we can do to protect the southern sea otter…and ourselves.

BASIC FACTS ABOUT SEA OTTERS

http://www.defenders.org/sea-otter/basic-facts

WATER DROPLET HAPPY ICON GIMPCROPPEDI’ve enjoyed these mini videos so much that I will purchase the full length video to enjoy with my grandchildren.

Happy 1st Day of Spring! 

Have a great weekend everyone.

Advertisements

THE BIZARRE AND COLOURFUL WORLD OF SEA STARS

Starfish, also known as sea stars are a ubiquitous ocean species, with around 1,800 living species occurring in all the world’s oceans, and can be found at ocean depths greater than 6,000 meters.

“The Sunflower Sea Star”  is one of OceanFutures Society’s many videos ~ Uploaded on Oct 27, 2009 – When people think of sea stars, they don’t typically think of voracious predators scouring the seabed, leaving carnage and fear in their wake, but this may simply be a matter of perspective. To the scallop or clam, this sea star is a pure nightmare. This whimsical look at one of the ocean’s less known predators may change your perception of sea stars forever. For more unique insights into the ocean realm, watch America’s Underwater Treasures, a two-hour episode of the PBS series Jean-Michel Cousteau: Ocean Adventures

Some 2,000 sea star species live throughout the world’s oceans. Some weigh as much as 11 pounds (5 kilograms) and stretch more than 2 feet (65 centimeters) across, but others are only half an inch (1 centimeter) in diameter. These animals reproduce prolifically, and some sea stars can release millions of eggs into the water for fertilization at the same time.

Starfish can go from soft (able to squeeze into small spaces) to rigid in a split second. In fact, their entire anatomy is surprisingly complex, including their nervous system.

The undersides of starfish have many tube feet capable of grasping on to things with amazing force. They work on a hydraulic water vascular system which aid the starfish’s movement – some species very slowly while others can move up to 9 feet in one minute. The tube feet are also used to grasp and deal with food.

Uploaded by on Mar 13, 2011 ~ This star fish is walking around my tank all the time, it just cruises the entire tank. Excellent to watch.

Secondly, the underside is where their mouth is located. They can swallow their prey whole and down it goes in a short esophagus to a cardiac stomach, and then on to a second pyloric stomach. But they don’t have to swallow… when dealing with prey larger than its mouth, many species of starfish can also spit out their stomachs to engulf the food and begin to digest it before pulling everything back into its body – eueew! (In this photo the sea star is eating a clam!)

Green Brittle Star at feeding time ~ Uploaded by on Nov 8, 2008.  This is my 2 year old green brittle star at feeding time.

Starfish species don’t all come with five arms. Several species have 10 to 15 arms, and some other species have as many as 50.

These bottom-dwellers play important roles in the ocean ecosystem, including keeping populations of shellfish in check, and, according to recent studies, absorbing large amounts of carbon in the world’s oceans.

Ever wonder what happens to a starfish when it is flipped upside down? ~ Uploaded by on Jun 8, 2010

NUDIBRANCHS UPDATE ~ INCREDIBLE FACTS AND VIDEOS

Since I first posted “NUDIBRANCHS – SAY WHAT?”,  May 14, 2012), I’ve found the time to delve further into these fascinating and exotic ocean creatures.  You will be thrilled and amazed with the facts shared on these YouTube videos and the awesome video footage from around the world (Indonesia, Philippines, Bali)

First a few very interesting facts:

Nudibranch ~ means “naked gills”
Nudibranchs ~ are sea slugs
~ are beautifully colored tiny vessels of danger
~ store toxins/stinging cells they steal from their prey
~ more than 3,000 species
~ range in length from 1/4 inch to over 1 foot
~ are hermaphrodites (meaning they have both male and female sex organs)
~ are found in oceans from Antarctica to the tropics

I won’t overload you with information, for as they say, “a picture is worth a thousand words”.

“Nudibranchs”, by Jean-Michel Cousteau, Ocean Adventures ~uploaded by on Dec 5, 2008 ~ “They might be tiny, but nudibranchs can pack a poisonous punch. Learn more about these extraordinary creatures”.

 

This next video is amazing ~ the music, “The Tahiti Trot” is very artistically adapted to the bizarre antics of the nudibranchs  ~ an award winner in my opinion!!!

Colorful nudibranchs in Lembeh Indonesia” ~ uploaded by  Delveroudis on Jul 5, 2010 ~ “… But they are the most colorful creatures on Earth and their body patterns exceed the imagination of the best designers on the planet.”

“Nudebranches of Amed – Bali Reef Divers – Dive Bali” ~ uploaded by on Nov 9, 2010 ~ courtesy of Hero Productions ~ “These nudibranches were seen around Amed and Tulamben this season… wide variety of nudibranchs species around here… Night dives at Jemeluk are also a great opportunity to see these creatures!”

http://www.balireefdivers.com