Tag Archives: Rainsoft of Ottawa

OMG!!! GREAT WHITE SHARK VERSUS SEA KAYAKER

Before we get to the “OMG” video of this blog I thought I’d share  some amazing background information, featured on the Discovery Chanel video uploaded to YouTube, on the great white shark –  length, weight, speed of travel, nature, favorite foods -“triple hot fudge ice-cream sundae with 3 cherries on top” (SAY WHAT??  I’m sure glad to hear that I taste like a lima bean!

The following is a YouTube video ‘Great White Shark’, uploaded by on Aug 30, 2007 – great white sharks leap out of the water in pursuit of their favorite food.

Breaching (fish and mammals jumping out of the water)

Cape Town, South Africa, “Great White Shark Jumping”.  A shark attacks a seal at Seal Island  – airborne shark jumps out off water 12′ – another YouTube video uploaded by on Sep 22, 2007.

In the past I’ve posted a few blogs concerning: The Great Barrier Reef; and Our Coral Reefs are in Crisis.  I have just learned about the very important role that great white sharks play in the life of the coral reefs.

Having received permission of the Coral Reef Alliance, I would like to share excerpts of their article, “CORAL Campaigns to Protect Sharks” (link provided at end of blog) with you:

Sharks are commonly misunderstood and widely feared. These remarkable animals, however, are incredibly important for overall ocean health and, in particular, for coral reefs.

Sharks are often “apex” or top predators, helping to regulate species abundance and diversity while maintaining balance throughout an ecosystem. Studies have shown that coral reef ecosystems with high numbers of apex predators tend to have greater biodiversity and higher densities of individual species.

The loss of apex predators in a reef ecosystem upsets the natural food web and changes the composition of the reef community, eventually leading to the decline of critical reef species like herbivorous fish. With fewer herbivores, algae can become overgrown, suffocating the reef and reducing the number of available niches for fish species. In addition to being important for overall ecosystem health, sharks are also valuable to the tourism industry and to the economic health of coral reef destinations.

Despite their ecologic and economic value, shark populations are declining at an alarming rate. Roughly thirty percent of shark species are threatened or nearly threatened with extinction, and the status of another roughly fifty percent is unclear due to insufficient data.

NOW WHAT YOU’VE WAITED FOR – THE “OMG’ PORTION of this blog – click on link below photo

“A fishing trip off the coast of Australia takes a frightening turn when a great white shark starts harassing a sea kayaker” Discovery Channel “Outdoor Thrills” – Untamed and uncut.

http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/outdoor-thrill-videos/

Link to the Coral Reef Alliance (a most worthy cause!) web site –

http://www.coral.org/sharks

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RAIN DANCE VIDEOS and ETHNIC MUSIC

Today I’d like to feature the true beauty of native dance, art, photography, music and videos.

INCREDIBLY BEAUTIFUL MUSIC SET IN NATURE’S PALETTE:

Spiritual and soulful music in harmony with nature – cascading waterfalls, flowing rivers and lush forests.

‘Listen to Native flute – feel the embrace of the heart and soul – feel the embrace of your life and feel the flow of the clean clear water that is so pure and is so free. It is the river of life for without this clean clear water we cannot survive in this world that we live in.’

Comment from YouTube poster, helen1436: ‘This video has real footage of the Sioux back when we first had film.actualy i had to pay 50 pounds for that tiny bit of footage but well worth it . i smile every time i see the 2 guys at left front dance i just feel like reaching out and giving them a hug, daft i know but just make me smile and feel happy when i watch them, and i love to watch the chiefs too i have to admit this is my fave real footage of the Sioux dancing, sad to think they are long gone since that video was taken i wonder who their now relations are, as they are all sioux’

Manantial – Rain Dance

A few interesting comments on the video from viewers:

‘How beautiful Native American people were, the clothes they made, how every part of animal & buffalo was used for teepee, robes, clothes, moccasins, sewing awl, even hoofs was used for glue, nothing was wasted. If 1 mourned the entire camp did too, their knowledge of plants/herbs. Most of all I admire how they respected all living things, took only what was needed to survive & gave thanks to Creator. In Memory of Chiefs Joseph, Sitting Bull, Red Cloud, Geronimo, Tecumseh, Quanah & many others.’

May the great waters cleanse and cascade through my spirit, And lead me to the Earth Mother’s Cauldron of Wisdom – May the grace of the Sea exhale Her breath on the shore – Where I shall reflect into the deep center of my being.

Thank you for visiting – we hope you enjoyed your time with us today.  Your comments are always welcome and we do our best to respond.

RAIN DANCE FRIDAY HUMOUR from RAINSOFT OTTAWA

This has to be one of the funniest videos I’ve seen featuring rain dancing:

Just For Laughs – Gags – Epic Old Man – Rain Dance – Hidden Camera

 ALL HUMOUR ASIDE, on MONDAY I will feature first-rate videos of ethnic rain dances and mesmerizing ethnic music set in nature’s palette – definitely something you don’t want to miss!

      Looking forward to ‘having you back’ with us on Monday to watch the videos, read comments and hear the relaxing music.  Have a great weekend everyone.

CANADA’S GREAT LAKES ARE IN TROUBLE

CANADA’S GREAT LAKES ARE IN TROUBLE

The following excerpts are taken from “Our Great Lakes Commons: A Peoples Plan to Protect the Great Lakes Forever”, by Maude Barlow, National Chairperson, Council of Canadians.  I’ve also included some information from Environment Canada.

I encourage you to watch the video, “Incredible by Any Measure…the Great Lakes”, created by The Nature Conservancy, that I’ve placed at the end of this blog – a wealth of information and incredible cinematography.

The Great Lakes of North America form the largest group of freshwater lakes in the world, holding more than 20 per cent of the world’s surface freshwater and 95 per cent of North America’s. Add to this the groundwater underlying and feeding the Great Lakes or its tribu­tary streams and lakes, and the percentage is closer to 25 and 97 per cent respectively. The Lakes and the St. Lawrence River, which is their primary flow outlet to the Atlantic Ocean, are bordered by two Canadian provinces: Ontario and Quebec, and eight U.S. states…

The Great Lakes have a unique biodiversity and are home to more than 3,500 species of plants and animals. They were formed over 20,000 years ago when the last glacier continental ice sheet retreated. The Great Lakes provide life and livelihood to more than 40 million people and are the economic centre at the heart of the continent. They are, however, under serious threat from a wide variety of demands and sources… There is a misconception that the Great Lakes replenish themselves each year with rainwater. This is not true.

. . . we have built our economic and development policies based on a human-centric model and assumed that nature would never fail to provide, or that, where it does fail, technology will save the day. We have polluted, diverted and mismanaged the planet’s finite supplies of water to the point that they are now dangerously close to collapse in many parts of the world . . . The waters of the Great Lakes are no exception to this rule.

 The Great Lakes – some vital statistics

The five Great Lakes  hold one-fifth of the fresh water on the earth’s surface and 80 percent of the lake and river water in North America. The Great Lakes basin, including the water and land area that drains into the lakes, covers 766,000 square kilometres (295,700 square miles). The shoreline of the five Great Lakes and the connecting rivers stretches for 17,000 kilometres (10,200 miles), long enough to reach nearly halfway around the world. The water of the Great Lakes flows from the middle of the continent to the Atlantic Ocean.  The lakes contain the world’s largest system of freshwater islands, some of which are refuges for rare and endangered species. About five million people fish in the Great Lakes. Close to one million boats, mainly pleasure craft operate on the Great Lakes.

A few ways we can help keep the environment and wildlife species of our Great Lakes safe.

Keep hazardous materials out of the water. Purchase products that are produced in ways that have a low impact on the environment. Use safe disposal methods for insect and weed killers, paints, solvents, used motor oil, and other auto fluids. Take them to hazardous waste centres for disposal. Take used motor oil to a service station for recycling. Take medicines to a pharmacy for safe disposal. Keep litter, pet waste, leaves, and debris out of street gutters and storm drains. Avoid hosing dirt into storm sewers because it can reduce flow in them and be carried into lakes and rivers. Use low-phosphate or phosphate-free detergents. Use natural pest-control methods. Disconnect downspouts and direct rainwater into a barrel or onto your lawn or garden. Use separate stones and porous materials instead of concrete for walkways, driveways, and patios so that water will seep into the ground rather than draining into the sewer systems. Support car washes that treat or recycle their wastewater and dry cleaners that are using new “green” processes.

 Video – “Incredible by Any Measure…the Great Lakes”

 Links –

http://onthecommons.org/sites/default/files/GreatLakes-Final-Mar2011(2).pdf

http://www.ec.gc.ca/media_archive/press/2005/050526_b_e.htm

FRIDAY AQUA ENTERTAINMENT – RainSoft – Eternally Pure Water Systems, Inc

Have I got some really neat water entertainment for you!!!

Synchronised Swimming a la Britain’s Got Talent

Awesome ‘Aqua Divas’

2012 Contestants
Quote from YouTube video info: “Watch synchronised swimmers Aquabatique make waves on Britain’s Got Talent auditions. Will Judges Simon Cowell, Amanda Holden, Alesha Dixon and David Walliams leave them to synch or swim?

Published on May 10, 2012 by Ontv2012

Aquabatique Synchronised swimmers ballet HD Britain’s got talent 2012 Live Semi Finals. Aquabatique perform their underwater dance act outside the studio. They perform their water ballet routine to a medley of James Bond theme tunes.

Britain’s Got Talent 2012 Final – Aquabatique

Have a great weekend everyone.

FIRST FRENCH “PEDAL POWERED” SUBMARINE: THREE VIDEOS

This is the first time I’ve tried adding a sound track to my blog and it works – thanks to soundcloud.com!  If you are enjoying the music you might like to read ‘my personal note to all my readers’ at the end of the blog before you watch the amazing videos – enjoy!

PEDAL POWERED SUBMARINE 

The world’s first pedal powered submarine, called, “The Scubster”, has been invented in France by Minh-Lôc Truong and Stéphane Rousson, a team of French designers and engineers.   The sub is powered by connecting a pedal belt to a twin-propeller system that can reach speeds of up to 8 km an hour (5 mph ). The Scubster can reach a depth of 6 meters (20 ft), ideal for peddling through rivers, and shallow ocean excursions.

france, pedal-powered submarine, submarine, yellow submarine, scubster, pedal-powered submarine, french pedal powered submarine, scubster pedal power, scubster french submarine

I have included three videos; “A Scubster Story”;  the under ice testing at Piau-Engaly in the Pyrenees mountains in France; and also one from the 2009 International Submarine Race in Bethesda, Maryland.

     Link to YouTube video, “A Scubster Story” –

      Link to Scubster web site –

http://www.scubster.org/eng-Home.html

      YouTube video of winter testing under ice at Piau-Engaly, France

      Link to YouTube video, 10th Biennial International Submarine Races, 2009 –

Personal note to all my readers –

After checking recent stats on our blog, I am absolutely blown away by the number of readers from around the globe who are sending best wishes and comments (which of course makes my work so much more rewarding).  Countries we’ve heard from so far (all 64 of them!) are listed below.  Rainsoft of Ottawa thanks everyone for your support and for showing your appreciation of my work ‘behind the scenes’. I hope to continue posting intriguing topics that pique your interest, inspirational posts for you to share, environmental concerns that will encourage you seek information from other sources and of course water related posts (conservation, environment, health, sports, marine biology, oceanography, etc.)  It’s also great to ‘tickle your funny bone’ with some of our “Fun Friday” posts from time to time.  Make sure to take time to check through our archives – many informative, enlightening, inspiring  and humourous articles await you…

      United States, Canada, India, Poland, United Kingdom, Australia, Philippines, Germany, Pakistan, South Africa, Lebanon, Dominica,  Costa Rica, Panama, Italy, Netherlands, Croatia, Denmark,  United Arab Emirates, Slovenia, Singapore, New Zealand, Republic of Korea, Hong Kong, Mexico, Greece, Bulgaria, Portugal, Albania, Venezuela, Czech Republic, Chile, Indonesia, Brazil, Turkey, Thailand, Bahamas,  Honduras, Trinidad and Tobago, Japan, Finland, Azerbaijan, Ukraine,  Belgium, Russian Federation, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Egypt, Ireland,  Peru,  Hungary, Switzerland, Malaysia, Bangladesh, Serbia, Norway,  Morocco,  Ghana, Colombia, Saudi Arabia, Macedonia, Cameroon,  Viet Nam,  Syrian Arab Republic, Ecuador.

GREENLAND GLACIERS ON THE MOVE

GREENLAND GLACIERS ARE SPEEDING UP

A glacier is a large persistent body of ice that forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation (melting and sublimation) over many years, often centuries.   Crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features of a glacier are due to its flow.  Another consequence of glacier flow is the transport of rock and debris abraded from its substrate and resultant landforms like cirques and moraines.  Glaciers form on land, often elevated, and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water.

Greenland’s ice sheet is on the move, with new images showing its glaciers moving 30 percent faster than they were a decade ago.

Excerpts from article by Jennifer Welsh, Live Science Staff Writer Date: 03 May 2012

We encourage you to read the full article by checking the site’s url at the end of this blog.

The heavily crevassed ice on this small Greenland outlet glacier cascades down to the fjord water (bottom right), which is filled with icebergs and small bits of ice.
CREDIT: Ian Joughin and Science / AAAS

Small Ice Sources Pose Big Threat to Rising Seas Greenland and Antarctica … glaciers are shrinking and the water contained in them is moving into the oceans, adding to the already rising sea level.  A glacier’s velocity is a measure of how fast the ice on the surface of the sheet is flowing … The faster the flow, the more water and ice mass is lost from the glacier.

Greenland Glacier“You can think of the Greenland ice sheet as a really large lake that has hundreds of those little outlet streams that are acting like conveyor belts to move ice from the middle of the ice sheet, where it’s getting added by precipitation, to the edges,” study researcher Twila Moon, a graduate student at the University of Washington, told LiveScience

Alaskan Iceresearchers analyzed satellite images of the Greenland glaciers taken between 2000 and 2010. These annual images were put through a computer program to detect how quickly the ice is moving. In general, the glacial flow has sped up by 30 percent over the 10 years, Moon said … The glaciers that drop off into the sea are flowing the fastest, Moon said, up to 7 miles (11 kilometers) per year and their speeds are accelerating. “The areas where the ice sheet loses the most ice are also the areas we are seeing the biggest changes,” Moon said…

“A lot of the drive behind current Greenland ice sheet and Antarctica studies is to ask, ‘What sea-level rise can we expect?'” Moon said. “Both of these areas hold vast amounts of ice and the potential for very large sea-level rises. We need to understand what’s happening on them to see what potential scenario will be realized.”

Jennifer Welsh, LiveScience Staff Writer, May 03,2012

http://www.livescience.com/20082-greenland-glaciers-velocity.html

 Some images taken from LiveScience Ice World Album –

Stephanie Pappas, LiveScience Senior Writer, 05 August 2011
 
 AMAZING!!! Video of iceberg collapse in Wilhemina Bay region in Antarctica –YouTube, Mar 6, 2012 by –