Tag Archives: United Nations

PROFITS POUR IN FROM RAIN BARRELS

Excerpt from EMC Ottawa Newspaper, Mar. 2012

The United Nations designated the first World Water Day on March 22, 1993, to highlight the importance of freshwater and to advocate for sustainable management.

More than 80 non-profit groups throughout Ontario officially launched rain barrel sales in their communities on World Water Day, Thursday, March 22 … Rain barrels will be sold for $55 each and all funds will to wards the two local projects.

Rain barrels capture and store rain water collected from roofs through downspouts. They provide chlorine-free and fluoride-free water, which is ideal for flowers, vegetables, lawns, shrubs and trees.

Interesting that they mention the chemical free water is good for plants—Good for People too!!!

Rain barrels divert clean water from sewer systems and can provide cost savings for homeowners who currently pay to have water trucked in or who have a water meter installed.

Each rain barrel is equipped with a mosquito and leaf debris filter basket, an overflow hose, an outlet to join rain barrels together and a spigot at the bottom, which can be connected to a standard garden hose.

These environmentally friendly products were once used to import fruits and vegetables and have been refurbished and repurposed to offer years of reliable service as rain barrels.

They are available in three colours including grey, terracotta and black. All orders must be placed online in advance at http://www.RainBarrel.ca/gssandouc/ or by calling Margaret at 613-824-3599.

The 4th Orleans Fallingbrook Scout Group will also host a rain barrel sale on Saturday April 21 at Fallingbrook Elementary School, 679 Deanscourt Crescent, Orleans, from 10:30 to 1:30 p.m. Orders are now being taken for an April 21st pickup date. All orders must be placed online in advance at http://www.RainBarrel.ca/4thOrleans or by calling 613-212-5212.

Related link –  

http://rainbarrel.ca/

There is still time to book your fundraising rainbarrel.ca sale for this spring!  Non-profit groups, schools and organizations: We are booking now for May and June 2012 sales!

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UN’S AD DESIGN COMPETITION FOR WATER CONSERVATION

AD DESIGN COMPETITION SEEKS TO RAISE AWARENESS ABOUT WATER CONSERVATION

Are any of our readers/followers into artistic design/graphic arts?

If so, read on and good luck if you decide to enter the competition.  Let us know so we can help raise awareness through your efforts.

 The United Nations is now hosting a design competition, calling on so-called European “Artivists” to design ads that support water conservation efforts.

 The competition is part of the DropbyDrop campaign for “The Future We Want” initiative for the Rio+20 conference. DropbyDrop’s aim is to get people motivated to conserve water, the earth’s “most precious resource.” Europeans are now encouraged to find a creative way to raise awareness to a global issue.

The goal of the contest is to design a print advertisement that motivates others to preserve water, for those in need now as well as future generations. Professionals and non-professionals are invited to submit ideas for a newspaper ad that will inspire the European public to change their water habits.

 The winners will have their work displayed on the website. There is a possibility that the work will also be exhibited, and of course placed in European print publications. A jury of graphic designers, photographers and environmental experts will choose who wins.

And, there are prizes, including a 5000 euro cash prize from the Nordic Council of Ministers, a potential internship at Fabrica communication research for participants under 25, and a public voting prize.

 The Future We Want is an interesting campaign aimed at raising awareness of the Rio+20 conference.”This global conference could change the way we think about our world in terms of economic, social and environmental matters,” says Drop by Drop.

“The UN is engaging all citizens to put forward their ideas. Initiatives and competitions like this one from all corners of the globe that will form a part of a global conversation about the Future We Want.”

The Rio+20 conference will focus heavily on the green economy and sustainable development, so the partnership between the conference and this competition make sense. Of course an ad is just a small contribution, but incentives like a competition to bring designers together for a common good shouldn’t be shrugged off.

All entries must use the provided logo, and will be accepted until the end of February. Winners will be announced this June.

http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/design-architecture/ad-design-competition-seeks-to-raise-awareness-about-water-conservation/3882?tag=search-river

TOGETHER, WE ARE SOLVING THE GLOBAL WATER CRISIS

Today much of the world faces a global safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene crisis. In contrast to easy access to taps and toilets across the United States, one out of every eight people worldwide lacks safe drinking water and two out of every five people lack adequate sanitation.

World Water Day is held every March 22. Recognized by the United Nations and the global community, World Water Day reminds us that much of the world still faces a global water, sanitation and hygiene crisis, and that it is our urgent obligation to act.

A coalition of diverse US-based groups is calling for increased commitments by the US government and private citizens to reduce poverty, disease and hunger by helping to improve sustainable access to safe drinking water and improved sanitation for many millions around the world.

Why Invest in Water and Sanitation?

Water, sanitation & hygiene programs are important in their own right, but they also yield results across multiple sectors, making this investment one of the smartest in tight economic times. Communities with safe drinking water and adequate sanitation see tangible progress in children’s health, school attendance, and local economic development. In addition, many key water, sanitation and hygiene solutions are cost-effective: every $1 invested in water, sanitation and hygiene improvements returns on average $8 in increased economic productivity and averted healthcare costs.

Investments in water, sanitation and hygiene are working, but there is a long way to go. Significant progress has been made globally towards achieving the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) for water. The world is on track to meet the MDG targets for water, and in sub-Saharan Africa access to safe drinking water has improved 22% since 1990.

However, many of the most vulnerable countries remain underserved. Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, is home to 40% of those without safe drinking water, with at least 15 countries in the region not on track to meet the MDG target. Even more startling, nearly 40% of the world’s population lives without access to adequate sanitation and only a handful of developing countries are on track to meet the MDG target.

What Should Be Done?

US support for water, sanitation and hygiene has produced demonstrable results in thousands of communities around the world.

Solutions include digging wells and boreholes, harvesting rainwater, protecting springs, water filtering and purification, educating families about easy hygiene methods like hand washing and building safe and affordable latrines. Sustainability is key: programs must be implemented in a fashion that is sustainable on a local level, in technical, financial, social, and environmental terms. Integrating simple and cost-effective water, sanitation and hygiene solutions into child survival, health, and nutrition programs can dramatically decrease both child mortality and long-term developmental problems caused by the most common child killers • diarrhea, pneumonia and malnutrition.

We encourage decision-makers to target US funding to the countries and communities most in need. Helping to provide access to safe drinking water and improved sanitation in those communities will also ensure progress toward related goals: improved health, economic productivity, environmental sustainability, and better educational outcomes.

Why now?

The needs are great, and solutions exist today. Today’s investments in global water, sanitation and hygiene initiatives are working. Around the world, successful models for replication exist. While working towards long-term change in infrastructure, capacity building and health systems, the US government and other donors should prioritize funding and implementation for programs that can deliver packages of cost-effective, sustainable water, sanitation and hygiene interventions available today.

About the Coalition for World Water Day

A diverse coalition of safe drinking water, sanitation, hygiene, health and environmental organizations has come together for World Water Day 2012. Its goal is to raise awareness and call for stronger commitments and more robust action to ensure universal access to safe drinking water and sanitation. The 2012 coalition includes Action Against Hunger, Africare, Catholic Relief Services, CARE, Church World Service, Conservation International, Earth Day Network, Emory University, FHI 360, Foundation Center Global Soap Project, Global Water Challenge, Helen Keller Institute, Improve International, Innovations for Poverty Action, Lions Club International, Living Water International, Millennium Water Alliance, Natural Resources Defense Council, PATH, Plan, Procter & Gamble, PSI, Save the Children, Tetra Tech, The Earth Institute at Columbia University, The Nature Conservancy, WASH Advocates, WASRAG, WaterAid, Water and Sanitation Program, Water For People, Water.org, and World Vision.

 http://waterday.org/about/

WATER DAY CANADA 2012

MAKE A SPLASH ON WORLD WATER DAY!

March 22 is World Water Day, and to mark this day, the Council of Canadians is encouraging chapters to take action for water in their community. As you know, there are few things more important than clean, safe water.

But corporate control of drinking water, the growth of the bottled water industry, pollution from mining companies and fracking projects,

and water shortages from droughts and over-extractions are all part of a growing global water crisis.

In Canada, our government has failed to safeguard our water by refusing to implement a National Water Policy to protect and conserve it.

The Canadian government also shamefully ignores the human right to water and sanitation, which was recognized by the United Nations in July 2010.

But you can make a difference. The fight for public water is happening now. Across Canada people are rejecting the co-modification and privatization of water, and are raising awareness of the importance of clean, safe accessible public water for all.

Join us in marking the importance of World Water Day by organizing a water-themed event in your community. Be sure to let us know about your World Water Day activities so we can highlight them on our website. E-mail your event details to webmaster@canadians.org. And don’t forget to check out our resources and publications to help inform people and raise awareness.

Here are some ideas for how you can take action on World Water Day:

1) Take action for the right to water.

On July 28, 2010, the United Nations General Assembly overwhelmingly agreed to a resolution declaring the human right to “safe and clean drinking water and sanitation.” Appallingly, the Canadian government abstained from the vote even though there are many communities across Canada, including First Nations, which do not have access to clean, safe water. Take action and help us apply the political pressure needed to make the right to water and sanitation a reality in Canada!

•Join us in putting pressure on the federal government. Download a copy of the “Appeal to Parliamentarians on the Human Right to Water and Sanitation” letter and our Parliamentarian Pledge on the Human Right to Water and Sanitation. Arrange a meeting with your elected Member of Parliament and ask them to sign the pledge. Be sure to send a copy to inquiries@canadians.org so we can add your MP’s name to a list of supportive politicians on our website.

•Visit your local city council and ask them to pass a resolution supporting the right to water. Check out page 5 of our Blue Communities Project booklet for more information and a sample resolution.

2) Say “Don’t frack our water!”

Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking” is a drilling technique used to extract natural gas from hard to access sources. Massive amounts of water mixed with chemicals and sand are injected at a high rate of pressure into rock formations. The process has been known to contaminate nearby drinking water sources, and concerns have been raised about the safety of the contaminated wastewater from the projects. There are many ways you can help protect our water from fracking:

•Find out if there is a fracking operation in your community and send us an e-mail so we can add it to our “Fracker Tracker,” a web tool that maps frocking projects across the country.

•Help raise awareness by setting up an information booth in your community.

•Write a letter to the editor of your local paper.

•Visit your local council and convince politicians to protect water by passing a municipal resolution that puts a moratorium on fracking.

•Garner public support by getting signatures on a “Don’t Frack Our Water” petition.

3) Call for a bottled water ban in your community.

More than 60 communities across Canada have said “no” to bottled water. Canada has one of the best drinking water systems in the world, but the bottled water industry has worked hard to undermine our faith in public water. The industry sells water – what should be a shared public resource – for huge profits. Producing and transporting bottled water requires large amounts of fossil fuels, and plastic water bottles continue to end up by the millions in local landfills. Take a stand against bottled water in your community by:

•Call on your municipal council to ban bottled water in public places. For more information and a sample resolution, see page 9 of our Blue Communities Project Guide.

•Get creative and design a public display that demonstrates how many empty water bottles end up in landfills each year.

•Click here to read more about how we can all “Unbottle it!”

TAKE THE TAP WATER PLEDGE:

http://canadians.org/water/issues/World_Water_Day/petition/index.php

 

The Council of Canadians is also a partner in the Coalition for Bottled Water-Free Communities, which is encouraging school boards, organizations and people across Canada to go bottled water free on March 15. Go here to join the campaign.

4) Be a part of the fight against water privatization at the World Water Forum.

The World Water Forum (WWF) claims to be a democratic, multi-stakeholder platform for governments, civil society, academics and industry on global water issues, but past forums have shown that in fact, they are dominated by a handful of multinational food and water corporations with a strong agenda of privatization and corporate control of water.

The Council of Canadians has been challenging World Water Forum agendas for more than 12 years. We will be at the upcoming World Water Forum March 12-17 in Marseille, France, and the Alternative World Water Forum (in French, Forum Alternative Mondial de l’Eau, or FAME), which will take place on March 14-17, 2012, speaking out against the efforts of corporations and governments to privatize water. Visit our World Water Forum webpage to find out more.

5) Make a splash in the media.

Writing a letter to the editor or opinion column for your community newspaper is a great way to share information about local water issues. Whether it’s exposing water privatization, pollution, or encouraging people to dump bottled water in favour of public tap water, help raise awareness by getting water issues in the news on World Water Day.

Join us on March 22 and we can all make a difference for water in our communities!

SAVING NORTH AMERICA’S RIVERS – COUSTEAU VIDEO

Alexandra Cousteau brings attention to water issues in new documentary

By Ryan Stuart

The Colorado River used to create a massive estuary in the arm pit of the Baja Peninsula. The great river met the sea at a wetland the size of Delaware; 2-million acres of fish nurseries and a refuge for migratory birds.

However, in the last 50 years the Colorado river only actually reached the sea a handful of times. It has been sucked dry by Americans. The U.S. siphons off 90 percent of the water to soak lawns, water farmland and hydrate the nearby desert-loving people. The rest goes to Mexican cities.

Sad but true, the Colorado is one of many rivers in trouble, and this is just one of the growing number of water issues in North America. In 2010, Alexandra Cousteau set out to document many of these water issues in “Blue Planet 2010: North America.”

The granddaughter of Jacques Cousteau and a team of videographers, writers and photographers traveled 27, 000 kilometres across the United States in a biodiesel-burning bus/newsroom to investigate water issues. Wherever they stopped, they met with water crusaders to learn about local issues and raise money for local projects.

Next up for Cousteau, who has spoken at the United Nations, Harvard and the Smithsonian, is her most daunting challenge—Motherhood. But like her iconic grandfather, Cousteau isn’t taking much time off. She’s already planning her next project: an ambitious effort to restore a major U.S. watershed.

 Links –

“http://www.vimeo.com/15096754”

Alexandra’s website

http://explore-mag.com/1421/adventure/alexandra-cousteau-saving-rivers-2