Tag Archives: Great white shark

SHARK WEEK 2012 ~ SWIM WITH GREAT WHITE SHARKS!

To observe Shark Week 2012, I’ve found two incredible videos to share with you that I know you will find to be entertaining and educational.

Why ‘Shark Week‘ Sells

The terror of the deep swims onto television screens this week as the Discovery Channel’s beloved ‘Shark Week’ kicked off Sunday evening. Executive producer Brooke Runnette explains the 25-year success of the Discovery Channel event ~ “The Discovery Channel works with scientists across the world to produce the programming that has made Shark Week the staple of every shark enthusiast’s summer. Runnette says marine biologists often pitch ideas to her and the network provides funding for their projects. Discovery Channel also works with the Ocean and Pew Charitable Trusts to sponsor legislation and public service announcements to promote shark conservation.”  ~ excerpt from: http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2012/08/14/why-shark-week-sells

You will probably be amazed by the wealth of information about the great white sharks shared in the following video ~ CNN’S Anderson Cooper on Assignment for 60 minutes ~ YouTube video, “The Sharkman”  Uploaded by CBSNewsOnline on Jul 24, 2011.

Anderson Cooper dives unprotected with great white sharks and Michael Rutzen, known as “The Sharkman”, a South African who’s spent more time up close with the ocean’s most feared predator than anyone else.

According to Rutzen ,”the great white sharks are far from mindless killing machines – great whites are smart, curious and not out to kill humans.”  He says that when looking for a great white shark he can swim with, he needs one who is calm, curious and one he refers to as a ‘player’ – so relaxed, has a nice personality and woke up on the ‘right side of the reef’.

Another amazing video from YouTube ~ “THE SHARKMAN – Micheal Rutzen Hitches Ride On A Great White Shark“.

Michael Rutzen plunges freely with a great white shark. Rutzen eats, sleeps, breathes and dreams of sharks and is on a one-man crusade to prove that rather than being the crazed man-eater from Jaws they are in fact sociable and approachable creatures to anyone who understands their body language. Uploaded by on Aug 22, 2009

I trust that you enjoyed these videos and will share. Let’s hear from you ~ we appreciate your feedback.

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25TH ANNUAL SHARK WEEK AUG.12 – 18

Shark enthusiasts world wide know that this week is the 25th celebration of SHARK WEEK,  and for those who didn’t ~ now you do.  Why not let us know how you’re celebrating the event. 

Philip De Franco is Discovery Channel’s host for Shark Week, 2012 and was asked, Why are we so fascinated with sharks? “Sharks are the last ‘wild’ thing. The power and the general awesomeness make them near the top of the food chain, and there is something interesting in all of that.”  “They’re smooth. They’re iconic. They’re a lot of species,” De Franco says of sharks. “They’re just awesome.”

Great Whites of the Serengeti | Great White Highway” – Shark Week 2012, on the Discovery Channel ~Catch the premiere of SHARK WEEK 2012 Sunday, August 12, 2012 at 9PM e/p on Discovery. | http://dsc.discovery.com/tv/shark-week/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | The Pacific Ocean is like a Blue Serengeti, teaming with wildlife, great migrations and sharks. Very big sharks. “Great White Highway” is part of theShark Week

Check out the Discovery channel Shark Week’ viewing for this week:

http://dsc.discovery.com/tv/shark-week/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1

On Tuesday, Aug. 14th” you can watch, “Adrift: 47 Days with Sharks” (10 p.m., Discovery). The true story of soldiers who survived being in shark-infested waters for weeks is revealed in this documentary.

On Thursday, Aug.16th at 9 p.m. you can see, “Great White Highway” (9 p.m., Discovery). California‘s sharks don’t always swim around Hollywood deals. They can be found nearby in the ocean, too.

You’ll find many additional videos to watch with the same link above.

ENDANGERED SHARK POPULATIONS

Just after publishing my June 6, 2012 blog,”OMG – Great White Shark versus kayaker”, I received a current WWF newsletter featuring the concern of endangered shark populations.

I am including excerpts from that article and urge you to visit WWF’s site to read through comments submitted and related links.

May 14, 2012
Posted by staffblogger Jarrett Corke, Shark Project Coordinator, WWF-Canada

For as long as I can remember, sharks have been my passion… Over the past year, I’ve been working at WWF-Canada on shark conservation in Halifax, Nova Scotia, tackling the most pressing issues for Atlantic sharks.

So when I received an envelope last week addressed to Mr. Jarrett Corke with the words ‘To the General Shark Scientists of the World’ written in pencil along the edge, I was intrigued.  Inside were two letters, … the first letter. Written by the father of an exceptional young boy by the name of Jack Titterrell from Bowmanville, Ontario, the letter explained that his son had taken it upon himself to create these signs in the hopes of spreading his message – save the sharks. The second letter, dictated by Jack to his father, explained why he thinks people should take more care to avoid the unnecessary killing of sharks.”

Jack’s reasons (See the blog for the information included in each numbered section) included: 

1)Sharks are endangered and I want them to survive.”…
2) “Sharks are nature and swim so fast.”
3) “If they don’t survive, they will become extinct.”
Jack is right to be concerned. Sharks are in trouble and they need our help. The loss of these predators may have direct and indirect effects on marine ecosystems, not only impacting other marine organisms, but us too – the human communities that rely on ocean resources.
To learn more about what we do to help protect sharks, visit – http://www.wwf.ca/conservation/species/sharks/

http://blog.wwf.ca/blog/2012/05/14/dear-general-shark-scientists-of-the-world/?utm_source=panda_mail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=panda_mail_June_2012

CANADIAN SHARKS THREATENED PLUS AWESOME VIDEO

Please read, “Help Save Canada‘s Sharks” Posted by staffblogger By Jarrett Corke, Shark Project Coordinator, WWF-Canada May 14, 2012

http://blog.wwf.ca/blog/2012/05/14/dear-general-shark-scientists-of-the-world/?utm_source=panda_mail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=panda_mail_June_2012

At the end of this topic I’ve included Jonathan Bird‘s video,Shark Biology” (Webisode 45) as I’m utterly amazed to learn so many astonishing facts, as Jonathan swims among the sharks.  What an incredible insight into this endangered species!   This is a 10 minute video and is definitely worth watching – A MUST SEE!!
 – Jonathan swims with blue sharks and tries to pet one – will he get bitten?…
 – an underwater cave hold a deep surprise…
 – Jonathan swims with the largest toother animal on earth, the sperm whale…

       PROTECTING CANADIAN SHARK POPULATIONS

http://www.wwf.ca/conservation/species/sharks/

Most sharks are vulnerable to overexploitation due to their slow growth, late maturity, low reproductive rates, and long life. Globally, sharks…are among the most threatened marine vertebrates on Earth. Large open-water or ‘pelagic’ sharks, such as great whites, are among the most threatened. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species, it is estimated that 60% of pelagic sharks are currently threatened with extinction. As many of these species are wide-ranging top predators, their loss may have far-reaching consequences for marine ecosystems.

Twenty-eight species of shark have been reported in Canadian waters … Close to half of these species are considered to be globally threatened; still most Canadians remain unaware that sharks regularly occur in our waters…

 
 

WHAT ARE THE MAIN THREATS TO SHARKS IN CANADIAN WATERS?

In Canada, unsustainable fishing practices, in particular the unintentional capture of sharks in fisheries targeting tunas, swordfish or groundfish have caused shark populations to drastically decline.

Bycatch – ‘Bycatch’, or the unintentional capture of non-target species in commercial fisheries, is perhaps the single most significant threat to sharks in Canadian waters. Little is known about the distribution of sharks in Canadian waters and ways to minimize the incidence of bycatch and overall shark mortality…

Demand for shark fins – Shark ‘finning’, the removal of only the fins from sharks and dumping the remainder while at sea, is illegal in Canada; however, Canada is importing unsustainable shark products, including fins, for consumption and, globally, the growing trade of shark fins has become a threat to many shark species. The fin trade today is considered to be a primary driver in shark exploitation.

Changes in the marine environment – Destructive fishing activities, marine waste and coastal developments can have serious impacts on marine habitats which sharks depend on. Climate change impacts on the marine ecosystem can also be a cause of concern for sharks, particularly in terms of how population distributions and habitats for sharks, as well as their prey, may be affected.

VIDEO OUTLINE of Jonathan Bird’s, “Blue Sharks“:

Jonathan joins Charlie Donilon on his shark charter boat in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and learns about how shark tagging has shed light on the biology of and behavior of Blue sharks. Tagging has shown that these incredible swimmers actually migrate completely across the Atlantic ocean. Jonathan tries his hand at tagging a shark and then swims with Blue sharks. We also learn that Blue sharks are not nearly as vicious as they have been reputed to be, and the divers are actually able to pet the sharks!

OMG!!! GREAT WHITE SHARK VERSUS SEA KAYAKER

Before we get to the “OMG” video of this blog I thought I’d share  some amazing background information, featured on the Discovery Chanel video uploaded to YouTube, on the great white shark –  length, weight, speed of travel, nature, favorite foods -“triple hot fudge ice-cream sundae with 3 cherries on top” (SAY WHAT??  I’m sure glad to hear that I taste like a lima bean!

The following is a YouTube video ‘Great White Shark’, uploaded by on Aug 30, 2007 – great white sharks leap out of the water in pursuit of their favorite food.

Breaching (fish and mammals jumping out of the water)

Cape Town, South Africa, “Great White Shark Jumping”.  A shark attacks a seal at Seal Island  – airborne shark jumps out off water 12′ – another YouTube video uploaded by on Sep 22, 2007.

In the past I’ve posted a few blogs concerning: The Great Barrier Reef; and Our Coral Reefs are in Crisis.  I have just learned about the very important role that great white sharks play in the life of the coral reefs.

Having received permission of the Coral Reef Alliance, I would like to share excerpts of their article, “CORAL Campaigns to Protect Sharks” (link provided at end of blog) with you:

Sharks are commonly misunderstood and widely feared. These remarkable animals, however, are incredibly important for overall ocean health and, in particular, for coral reefs.

Sharks are often “apex” or top predators, helping to regulate species abundance and diversity while maintaining balance throughout an ecosystem. Studies have shown that coral reef ecosystems with high numbers of apex predators tend to have greater biodiversity and higher densities of individual species.

The loss of apex predators in a reef ecosystem upsets the natural food web and changes the composition of the reef community, eventually leading to the decline of critical reef species like herbivorous fish. With fewer herbivores, algae can become overgrown, suffocating the reef and reducing the number of available niches for fish species. In addition to being important for overall ecosystem health, sharks are also valuable to the tourism industry and to the economic health of coral reef destinations.

Despite their ecologic and economic value, shark populations are declining at an alarming rate. Roughly thirty percent of shark species are threatened or nearly threatened with extinction, and the status of another roughly fifty percent is unclear due to insufficient data.

NOW WHAT YOU’VE WAITED FOR – THE “OMG’ PORTION of this blog – click on link below photo

“A fishing trip off the coast of Australia takes a frightening turn when a great white shark starts harassing a sea kayaker” Discovery Channel “Outdoor Thrills” – Untamed and uncut.

http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/outdoor-thrill-videos/

Link to the Coral Reef Alliance (a most worthy cause!) web site –

http://www.coral.org/sharks

SHARK TEETH – EARTH SCIENCE PICTURE OF THE DAY

Photographer: Mila Zinkova Summary Author: Mila Zinkova; Jim Foster

The photo above shows a huge, ebony colored tooth of an ancient Cenozoic Era shark known as a megalodon. On top of it are two teeth from a modern era great white shark found on a California beach. Fossils indicate that megalodons reached a length of 52 ft (16 m); this compares to a length of 20 ft (6 m) for an exceptional great white shark. A shark’s tooth is one of the most commonly found fossils since sharks go through several sets of teeth during their life. Their teeth are lost routinely but new ones constantly grow in to replace the ones that are surrendered.

The great white sharks below were photographed when I went on a cage-diving expedition off Guadalupe Island, Mexico. I was on deck and not in the cage while these shots were taken. The sharks were ravenously feeding on tuna.

Below, the remains of a whale washed ashore at Ocean Beach in San Francisco in September 2010 show bite marks left by great white sharks. Though the species of whale couldn’t be identified, it was easy to tell that the bite marks were from a great white. A 2008 study determined that a great white shark specimen 20 ft (6 m) in length could exert a bite force of over 4,000 lbf (18,000 newtons), more than enough to cut through bone but not as forceful as the bite of a tiger shark or that of a Nile crocodile.

related links, see:
http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2012/02/shark-teeth.html

Comments

Some people think this big guy is still around….Not sure about that but the Megalodon must have had some very clean water to swim around in back then…