Tag Archives: oceans

Tragic! Ocean choking on 8 million metric tons plastic per year

 

Episode 6 Ocean Requiem, uploaded on Jun 30, 2009.  This is a rather slow moving video but the end is very touching. This is a good relaxing video with a message so enjoy and visit seashephard.org to see how you can help. 

February 13, 2015
Plastic in oceanPromo image Lindsay Robinson/University of Georgia
As Maggie recently wrote about, there’s a lot of plastic crap in Earth’s oceans; The latest estimate was that there are over 5 trillion pieces of plastic floating in our seas, weighing over 250,000 tons. That’s about 700 pieces of plastic for every human on earth.

Image result for Jenna Jambeck university of GeorgiaBut a new study paints an even more alarming picture of the situation. Jenna Jambeck and her colleagues at the University of Georgia found that an incredibly large amount of plastic waste is mismanaged by the populations living in coastal area, and that even a conservative estimate of how much ends up in the sea puts adds up to between 4.8 million to 12.7 million metric tons of plastic. Per year. (8 million is the mid-point of the estimate).

Part of the problem is that some of the countries with the largest coastal populations – mostly in Asia – are also developing nations with inadequate infrastructure to deal with all the waste that they generate.

Here one of the authors of the study explains the methodology behind the numbers and also gives a warning about the future if we don’t clean up our act on waste management:

Image result for From there, we looked at what percent of that waste is plasticOur methods for this estimate were to look at per person waste generation rates in 2010 from 192 countries with a coastline in the world. Because people’s activities nearest the coast are responsible for most of the plastic going into the water, we limited our analysis to a 50km strip of the coastline. From there, we looked at what percent of that waste is plastic, and what percentage of THAT is mismanaged waste (which means litter or when waste is not captured and dumped on the land). From there we had three scenarios of input into the ocean: low, mid and high. Our 8 million metric ton estimate is that mid-range scenario. 8 million metric tons of plastic is equal to 5 bags filled with plastic going into the ocean along every foot of coastline in the world. That… is HUGE.

And it can get worse. If we assume a business as usual projection with growing populations, increasing plastic consumption and increased waste generation, by 2025, this number doubles – we may be adding 17.5 million metric tons of plastic per year. If that happens, then our cumulative input over time from 2010 to 2025 is projected to be 155 million metric tons.

The solutions to this plastic pollution problem are known, we just need to actually do it. We need to cut back on plastic production in the first place, so there’s less of it in the system. Then whatever is left needs to all be captured and managed properly. This requires not only better infrastructure (especially in poorer areas of the world), but also social and cultural changes. People need to be educated on what needs to be done with their trash in general, and plastic specifically.

 

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CORAL REEF ALLIANCE PHOTO CONTEST

Whether or not you are a photographer, I think you will be impressed with the mission of the Coral Reef Alliance non-profit organization and you will also appreciate seeing the stunning photography submitted by former contest winners.

If you think your photography can equal or surpass some of the amazing entries seen below then definitely you should be interested in submitting your ‘winning’ photo to the ongoing Coral Reef Alliance Photo Contest.

Originally founded in 1994 to galvanize the dive community for conservation, CORAL has grown from a small, grassroots alliance into the only international nonprofit organization that works exclusively to unite communities to protect our planet’s coral reefs. We provide tools, education, and inspiration to residents of coral reef destinations to support local projects that benefit both reefs and people. We currently work in Hawaii, Mexico, Honduras, Fiji, and Indonesia.

Enter your favorite coral reef photographs in CORAL’s ongoing E-Current Contest for a chance to win a copy of Reef ~ a gorgeous coffee table book featuring beautiful coral reef photographs.

NOVEMBER CONTEST DEADLINE: October 15, 2012

Each winning photograph will be featured in an edition of E-Current, CORAL’s free electronic newsletter. The names of winning photographers will also be posted on the CORAL website with their photographs, which will be available for download as desktop wallpaper. All entrants will receive a subscription to E-Current.

Some of my favorites are:

 Winner of the May 2011 E-Current Photo Contest: Mandarinfish (Synchiropus splendidus) in Laha, Ambon, Indonesia by Christopher J. Crowley

 Winner of the January 2009 E-Current Photo Contest: Southern stingray (Dasyatis americana), Grand Cayman Island, by Jeremy Ellis 

Winner of the May 2010 E-Current Photo Contest: Spine-Cheek Anemone fish (Premnas biaculeatus), Wakatobi, Indonesia, by Matt Grace

Links ~

Site for previous winning photographs ~ http://www.coral.org/wallpaper

Photo Contest .pdf document ~

http://www.coral.org/files/pdf/photo-contest-flier.pdf

Enter contest ~

http://www.coral.org/node/3965

We hope you enjoyed your visit with us today and if you are a photographer ~ we wish you the best of luck! 
Keep your comments coming ~ we love hearing from and learning about our readers.

DAVID GALLO ~ UNDERWATER ASTONISHMENTS!!!

YOU WILL BE ABSOLUTELY AMAZED AT THE UNIQUE CAPABILITIES OF THESE UNDERWATER CREATURES!!!

http://www.ted.com David Gallo shows jaw-dropping footage of amazing sea creatures, including a color-shifting cuttlefish, a perfectly camouflaged octopus, and a Times Square‘s worth of neon light displays from fish who live in the blackest depths of the ocean. Uploaded by on Jan 14, 2008

I think the “jaw-dropping” moment they refer to happens 4 mins and 24 secs. into the video – don’t miss it!!

The wonderful octopus the ‘Wonderpus’ in Lembeh Strait, Indonesia, was uploaded by on 1 Mar 2011. Filmed in HD by The Digital Centre manager, Christian Loader. Music by Oka.   Eco Divers North Sulawesi, http://www.eco-divers.comWonderpus octopus – Lembeh Strait, Sulawesi, Indonesia.

This video, “octopus Camouflage” was uploaded to YouTube by on 2 Feb 2008

Deep sea creature‘s ability to camouflage for many reasons is absolutely fascinating!

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers are invited to give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, and Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, politics and the arts. Watch the Top 10 TEDTalks on TED.com, at
http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/top10

When I hear David Gallo mention that 97% of the ocean’s world  has yet to be discovered, I can’t wait to see what weird and wonderful mysteries of ‘the ocean deep’ will be studied and shared with us next!  

THE COLOUR OF BEAUTIFUL LAKES

While doing some research on another topic, I came across a photograph of an incredibly beautiful and colourful body of water and became curious enough to search for other photos and the factors that determine the different colours of our lakes and oceans.

I have a fabulous slide show for you that can be viewed full screen below.

THE COLOUR OF WATER

What color is water? It is a question that many children ask, not to mention adults, and the answer is invariably that it has no color. It is transparent, clear, see through. Is that answer the correct one?

In order to see the real color of water we must take a look at a large body –  where a great volume of water can be looked through or down into. It can be done scientifically as well, but the human eye can see the intrinsic color of water in the right conditions. You may well have already guessed what that color may be.

NOTE from the Editor: It has been pointed out to me by Joe Larsen, Researcher at USC, that the Rayleigh scattering of the light from the sun (according to which the blue light is scattered more than other colors) is also an important factor in the color of the oceans. Rayleigh scattering is also a reason behind the blue color of the sky.

Color is how the human eye perceives the reflection of different spectrums of light. We perceive color just as we perceive taste: sublime, exquisite, horrible and delicious. It provokes us, it enchants us and our whole world revolves around it. Everything from the clothes we wear, to the foods we eat are determined by color.

It’s only fitting then, that we explore some of Mother Nature’s most colorful works. The kaleidoscope of colors presented in this series of spectacular lake images, encapsulate the incredible natural beauty of enclosed expanses of water.

More info and photos:
http://athena.wednet.edu/curric/oceans/ocolor/index.html

http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae12.cfm

  Slideshow link –

  I hope you enjoy the spectacular photography!